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The Experienced English Housekeeper, 1769

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TITLE: The Experienced English Housekeeper
AUTHOR: Elizabeth Raffald
PUBLISHER:
DATE: 1769
THIS VERSION: Based on the online edition at archive.org, digitized by Google from a book in the collection of Harvard University. This is an Optical Character Recognition scan, it has been partly edited, but still contains very significant errors.

Elizabeth met her husband while working as housekeeper to the Warburtons of Arley Hall in Cheshire. The couple moved to Manchester, where Elizabeth ran a confectionery shop and John sold plants at a market stall. They had 16 children, all daughters. The Experienced English Housekeeper went through at least 13 authorised editions and perhaps 23 pirated ones. In 1773, she sold the copyright to her publisher for £1400, a huge sum for the time.



The £XFE&IEKCED

Engiifh Hbufe-keeper,

for the Ufe and Eafe of

Ladies, Houfe-keepets, Cooks, &c.

Wrote purely from PRACTICE,

And dedicated to the Hon. Lady Elizabeth Waxburtok^
Whom the Author lately fenred at Hoofe-keeper.
ConfifliDg of near 800 Original Receipts, moft of which neter
appeared in Print*
Part Fixst, Lemon Pickk, Browtiine for all Sorts of Made Diihes, Soups, Fifh, plain Meat, Game,- Made Difhes both hot and cold, Pyes, Puddmgs, £^c.
Part Second, All Kind o^Confeftionary, particularly the Gold and SiWer Web for covering of Sweetmeats, and a Defert of Spun Sugar, with Directions to (et out a TaUe in the moft elegant Manner and in the modern Tafte, Floating Iflands, Fifb Ponds, Traniparent Puddings, Trifles, Whips, &e.
Part Third, Pickling, Potting, and Coilarmg, Wines, Vi- negars^ Catchups, Diftilling, with two moft valuable Receipts, one for refining Malt Liquors, the other for curing Acid Wines, and a correft £ift of every Thmg in Seafon in every Month of the Year.
By E L I Z A B E T H R A F F A L D.
MANCHESTER;

Printed by 7. ffarr^f^ for the Author, and fold by Meflrs. F/nciir and Andtrfin^ in St^ Paul's Church-ya'rd, Lwd^ns and by Eiiz.Raffkldt ConfeCUonei:, near the Excbangt^ Mancbeft^^ 1769.

The Book to be figned by the Author's own ^Hand-writing, and entered at Stationers Hall.

NArVaIID COLLEGE LtlRARY^ iEQUEST OF CHOfrev M. 61llE IQt)9lfr SEfTEMBER 20, 1926

To the HoHOuRaBle ' Lady ELIZABETH WA-RBURTON.
PERMIT me honoured Madam to lay before you, a Work, for which I am ambitious of obtaining your Ladyship's Approbation, as much as to oblige a.great Numberof my Friends, wjio are wetl acquainted with the Practice I have had in the Art of Cookery, ever fmce I left your Ladyftiip's Family, and have often fojlicited rtte to piibUfli fot- the Inftruiflion of their Houfe-keepers.

As I flatter myfelf I had the Happinefs to giving Satisfatflion diirine my Service, Madam, in yoUr Family, it would be a ftill greater En- couragement, ilK)uld my Eadfiavours for the Service of my Sex, be hoeoured with the fa- vourable Opinion of fo good a Judge of Pro- priety and Elegance as your Ladyfliip.

I am not vain enough to propofe adding any . Thing to the Experienced Houfe-keeper, but I hope thefe Receipts (wrote purely from Prac- . tice) may be of ufe to young Perfons who are t willing to improve themfelves i ' I rdy on" your Ladyfhip's Candour, and f whatever Ladies favour this Book with reading ^ A 2 it.

fr~DEDICATION.

it, toeicuieihepliinneis of aie St^CiJU in Canpliancenith the de£re of my riKnds, I have ihidied to exprefs mjiielf {o as to be un- derftood by the poeaneft Capacity, and think myfelf happy in being allowed the Hpnpur of fubfcrifcing ..

MADAM,

Yonr LaHyfiiip'ii:, '

Moft dutiful,

Moft QWienf, .

i •. And'naeft humUc Senratit,*:

ELIZABBTH RAFFALD.

Ti.

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T O T H E

R E A P E R,

WHEN I refleft upon the Number of Books already in print upoiv this Subr« je(%, abdwith what Contempt they are read,

I cannot but be apnrebenfive that diis may meet the ianje Btte, Trom fame who yrill cen- iure it before ihey either fee it or try its Vidue.

Therefore, the only JJ^f^Fonr I have to beg of the Public, is not to cenfure my* Woric bcrore ^ey have made trial of fcnne one Receipt, which I am perfuaded, if carefully followed^ will %nfw)?r tneir Expeftations. .

As I can faithfully aflure my Friends, that diey arc truly wrote from my own Ejcperi-? ence, aiid not borrowed from any other Au- thor, nor gloiied onlftt With hard Names or Words of liigh St^ie, but wroK in my own plain Language, and every Sheet carefmly pe- rufed as it. came from tne Pre&, hxv'mg an Opportimiiy of having it printed by a Neighi hour, whom I can rely on doing it the ftridteft Juftice, without the le^ Alteration.

.The whqle Work being now compleated to my Wiihes, I think it my duty to render my moft fincere and grateful Thanks to my moft fioble and worthy Friends, who have already Ihcwp their good Opinion pf my Eodeayours

to

[ ii ]

to. ferve my: Sex, by railing me fo large a Sub- fcription, which far excells my Expeffcitions. I have not only been honoured by having above eight hundred of their Names inferced in my Subjfcription, but alfo have had all their Inte- reft ia this' laboripUs Undertakirfg, v^hkh I ha^e at laft "arrived to the 'Hippirfefs of com- pleating, though at the expence of my Health, by t»n B[ tob fkudious; and giving too clofe ah Apf^cation*

/The oDBly ^nhxious wifh* I have left, is, that mj iwronhy Friends may fii^d it u&ful in their Families^ an4 be an Infhndfcor to the toung and ignorant, as it has been my chiefeit Care p>. ^rite in as plain a Style as poflibk, fo as to be nndeiitodd by the weakeft Capacity. , ' I am not afraid of being called e^jtravagatiti if my Reader does' not think I have etred oa the frugal Hand.

^ I have made it my Study to pleafe both the Eye and the Palate, without tifing pernicious ^hing8 for the fake of Beautj.

And though I have given feme of my Diihea French Names, as they are only known by thofe Name% yet they will not be found very liipeniive, nor add Compo&tions but as plaiii as the Nature of the Dim will admit of.

The Receipts for the Confedionary, are fuch as I daily fell in my own Shop, which any Lady may examine at pleafure, as I flill continue my bcft Endeavours to givt Satisfaction to all A^ho are pleafed to favour me with their Cuftom*

It may be neceflary to inform my Readers^ that I have fpent fifteen Years in great an
worthy^



I Ui J

worthy FamUies, in the Capacity of a Houfc- keeper^ and had the Opportunity of travelling with them; but finding the common Servants generally fo ignorant in drefling Meat, and a good Cook fo hard to be met with, put me up- on ftudying the Art of Cookery more than per- haps I otherwife fliould have done; always en- deavouring to joinOeconomywrithNeatnefs and Elegance, being fenfible what valuable Quali- fications thefe are in a Houfe-keeper or Cook;• for of what ufe is their Skill, if they put their Mafter or Lady to an immoderate Expence in drefling a Dinner for a fraall Company, when at the fame Time a pnident Manager would have drefied twice the Number of Diflies, for a much greater Company, at half the Coft.

I have given no Directions for CuUis, as I have found by Experience, that Lemon Pickle and Browning anfwers both for Beauty and Tafte, (at a trifling Expence) bettar than CuUis, which is extravagant J for had I known the Ufe and Value of thofe two Receipts when I firft took upon me the Part and Duty of a Houfe- keeper, it would have faved me a great deal of trouble in making Grav)% and thofe I ferved a deal of Expence.

The Number of Receipts in this Book, arc not fo numerous as in fome others, but they are what will be found ufeful and fufficient for any Gentleman's Family, - neither have I med- dled with Phyfical Receipts, leaving them to the Phyficians fuperior Judgment, whofe pro- per Province they are.

THE

^^^^^m^^mm^gmttmmmm

THE

Experienced Englifli Houfe-Keepef .

Ohfervations on SOUPS.

^i5i HEN yoii make any Kind of SoiipS, wt ^^5S P^^^ic^^^rly Portable, Vermicelli, ffj^ W 4^ or brown Gravy Soup, or any other

*^4:^j^^^* that have Roots or Herbs in, al- SH^^HC ^vays obferve to lay your Meat in the Bottom of your Pan, with a good lump of Butter; cut the Herbs and Roots fmall, lay them over your Meat, cover it clofe, fet it over a very flow Fire, it will draw all the Virtue out of the Roots or Herbs, and turns it to a good Gravy, and gives the Soup a very different flavour from putting Water in at the firfl:: When your Gravy is almofl: dried up fill your Pan with Water, when it begins to boil take off the Fat, ind follow the DiredlionS of your Receipt for what Sort of Soup you arc njaking: When you make old Peafe Soup, take foft Water, for green Peafe, hard is the befl:, it keeps the Peafe a better Colour: When you make any white Soup, don*t put iri Cream 'till

A you

2 The Experienced

you take it ofF the Fire: Always diflx up your Soups the laft thing; if it be a Gravy Soup it will Ikin over if you let it iland, if it be a Peafe Soup it often fettles, and the Top looks thin.

Tq male- Lemon Picklc#

V TV«E tvro Dozen of Lemons, grate off fl%ei^^^ut-rinds very thin, cut them in four (^W^^s,^ Bfi^t leave the Ppttpms whpl ^> rub on them equally hjjf a Pound of Biy iSalf, and fpread them oij a large Pewter Difh, put them in a cool Oven, or let them dry gradually by the Fire 'till all the Juice is dried into the Peels, then put tl^em into a Pitcher well glazed, witb one dunce of Mace, half an Ounce of Cloves beat fine, one Ounce of Nutmegs cut in thin flices, four Ounces of Garlick peeled, half aPint of Muftard Seed bruifed a little, and tied in a Muflia Bag, pour two Quarts of boiling white Wine Vinegar upon them, clofe the Pitcher well up, and let it Hand five or fix Days by the Fire, make -it well up every Day, then tye it up and let it ftand for three Months to take off the bitter; when you bottle it, put the Pickle and Lemon in a Hair Sieve, prers them well to get out th^ Liquor, and let it fliand till another Day, then pour off the fine and bottle it, let the other ftand three or four Days and it will refinq itfelf, pour it off and bottle it, let it ftand again and bottle it, 'till the whole is re- fined; it may be put in any white Sauce, and will not hurt the Colour j it is very good for

Fifii

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 3

> .

¥i{h Sauce and Made Difhes, a Tea Spoonful is enough for whitfe^ and two for brown Sauce for a Fowl; it is a nioA ufeful Pickle and gives apleafant flavour: Be flire you put it in be- fore you thicken the Sauce, 6r put any Cream in, left the fliarphefs makes it cui'dle.

JBr owning fot Made Difhes

Beat fmall four Ounces of treljle refined Siigar, put it in a dean Iron I^jying Pan, with one Ounce of Butter, fet it over a clear Fire^ mix it very ifj^ together all the Time j when it begins to be frothy, the Sugar is diflblving, hold it higher over the Fire, have ready a Pint of Red Wine, when the Sugar and Butter is of a deep broVni, pour in a litue of the Wine, ftir it well together, then add more Wine, and keep ftirring it all the Time; put in half an Ounce of Jamaica Pepper, fix Cloves, four Shallots peeled, two or three blades of Mace, three Spoonftds of Muilirodm Catchup, a little Salt, the Out-rind of one Lemon, boil them flowly for ten Minutes, pour it into aBafon, when cold, take ^oflPthe fcum very clean, and bottle it for ufe.

To make Portable Soup yor Travellers,

Take three large Legs of Veal, and one of Beef, the lean Part of^ Half a Ham, cut them in fmall Pieces, put a Quarter of a Pound of Butter at the Bottom of a large Caldron, then lay in the Meat and Bones, with four Ounces of Anchovies, two Ounces of Mace, cut off the

A 2 green

4 The EXPERIEKCED

green Leaves of five or fix Heads of Celery, wafh the Heads quite clean, cut them fmall, put them ip, with three large Carrots cut thin, cover the Caldron clqfe, and fet it over a mode- rate Fire; when you find the Gravy begins to draw, keep taking it up 'till you have got it all out, then put Water in to cover the Meat, fet it on the Fire again, and let it boil flowly for four Hours, then flrain it through a Hair Sieve into a clean Pan, and let it boil three parts away, then ilrain the Gravy that you drawed from the Meat into the Pan, let it boil gently (and keep fcuming the Fat off very clean as it riies) 'till it looks thick like Gk,w; you muft take §reat Care when its near enough that it don't burn; put io Chyan Pepper to your Tafte,, then pour it on flat Earthen Diflies, a Quarter of ai^ In<:h jhick, and let it ftand 'till the next Day, and cut it out with round Tins a little larger than a Crown Piece i lay the Cakes on, Dimes, and fet them in ?he Sun to dry; thia Soup will anfwer bell to be made in frofty Weather; \y.ben the Cakes are dry, put them in a Tin Bo? with Writing Papey betwixt every Cakp, and keep them in a dry Place; this is a very ufeful Soup to be kept in Gentlemen's Fa- milies, for by.pourinff a Pint of boiling Water on pne Cake, and a little Salt, it will make a gQQd Eafpn of Broth. A little boiling Water poured P.n it, will make Gravy for a Turkey,, or Fowls, ^he longer it is kept the better.

N. S- Be careful to keep turning the Crakes. as thev dry.

._j

English HOUSE-KEEPER.

To make a Tranfparent Soup.

Take a Leg of Veal, and cut off the Meat as thin as you can, when you have cut off all meat clean from the Bone, brake the Bone in fmall Pieces, put the Meat in a large Jug, and theBonesat Top, with a bunch of Sweet Herbs, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace, half a Pound of Jordan Almonds blanched and beat fine, pour on it four Quarts of boiling Water, let it Itand all Night by the Fire covered clofe, the next Day put it into a well tinned Sauce Pan, and let it boil flowly till it is reduced to two Quarts; be fure you take the fcum and fat off as it rifes all the Time it is boiling; ftrain it into a Punch Bowl, let it fettle for tv/o Hours, pour it into ^ cle^o Sauce Pan clear from the Sediment, if any ?it the Bottom; have ready three Ounces ot Rice toiled in Water; if you like Vermicelli better, boil two Ounces, when epough, pxjt it in and ferve it up.

To make a Hare Soup.

Cut a large old Hare in fmall Pieces, and

f)Ut it in a Mug with three blades of Mace, a ittle Salt, two large Onions, one Red Herring, fix Morels, half a Pint of Red Wine, three Quarts of Water, bake it in a quick Oven three Hours, then ftrain it into aToffing Pan, have rea* dy boiled three Ounces of French Barley or Sa- go, in Water; fcald the Liver of the Hare in boil- ing Wat^r two Minutes, rub it through a Hair

Sieve

6 The £XP£R1£NC£I!>

Sieve with the back of a Wood Spoon, put it into the Soup with the Barley or Sago, and a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, fet it over the Fire, keep ftirring it, but don*t let it boil; if you don't like Liv^r, put in crifped Bread fleeped in Red Wine. This is a rich Souji, and proper for a large Entertainment; and where' two Soups are required, Almond ind Onion Sbup for the Top, and the Maife Soup for the? Bottom*

To make a picb VentiiccflU^ Soup*.

IwTo a* large Tolling Pan put four Ounces of Butter, cut a Knuckle of Veal*, and'^ a Scrag of Miitton into fmall Pieces, about the fisje of Wainuts, flice in the Meat of a Shank of Hatn, with three or four blades of Mate, two or three Carrots, two Parfnips, two lai^e Onions, with a Clove fhick in at each End, cut in foUf or five Heads of Celery wafhed clean, a Bunch of Sweet Herbs, eiglit or ten Morels, and an Anchovy, cover the Pan clofe up, and fet it over a flow Fire, without any Water, 'till the Gravy is drawn out of the Meat, then pour the Gravy out into a* Pot or Bafon, let the Meat brown in the fame Pan, and take care it don't bum, then pour in four Quarts of Water, let it boil gently 'till it is wafted to three Pints, then ilrain it, and piit the other Gravy to it, fet it on the Fire, add to it two Ounces of Vermi- celli, cut the niceft Part of a Head of Celery, Chyan Pepper and Salt to your Tafte, and let it boil for four Minutes j if not a good Colour,

put

English HOUSE-KEEPER, 7

put in a little Browning, lay a fmaU French Roll in the Soup Difh, pour in the Soup upon it, a^d lay fome of the Vermicelli over it.

To make 4n Ox Cheek Soup.

First break the Bones of ah Ox Cheek, and wafli it in many Waters, then lay it in warm • Water, throw in a little Salt to fetch out the flime, wafh it out very well, then take a large Stew Pan, put two Ounces of Butter, at tne Bottom of the Pan, and lay the flefli Side of the Cheek down, add to it half a Pound of a Shank of Ham cut in Slices, and four Heads of Celery, pull off the Leaves, walh the Heads clean, and cut them in with three large Onions, two Carrots, and one Parfnip fliced, a few Beets cut fmall, and three blades of Mace, fee it over a moderate Fire a quarter of an Hour; this draws the Virtue from the Roots, which gives a pleaffint ftrength to the Gravy.

I have made a good Gravy by this Method, with Roots and Butter, only adding a little Browning to give it a pretty Colour: When the Head ha? fimered a quarter of an Hour, put to it fix Quarts of Water, and let it ftew till it is reduced to two Quarts: If you would haye it eat like Soup, ftram and take out the Meat and other Ingredients, put the white part of a Head of Celery cut in fmall Pieces, with a little Browning to make it a fine Colour, take two Ounces of Vermicelli, give it a fcald in th^ Soup, and put the Top of a French Roll in the Middle of a Tureen, and fcrvc it up.

If

8 The ExrERi£S'c£D

If you would have it eat like Stew, take tip the Face as whole as poilible, and have ready cut in fquare Pieces a boiled Turnip and Car-* rot, a flice of Bread toafted and cut in fmall Dices, put in a little Chyan Pepper, and ftrain the Soup through a Hair Sieve upon the Meat, Carrot, Turnip, and Bread, fo ferve it up^

To make Almond Soup.

Take a Neck of Veal, and the Scrag-end of a Neck of Mutton, chop them in fmall Pieces, put them in a large Tolling Pan, cut in a Tur- nip with a blade or two of Mace, and five Quarts of Water, fet it over the Fire, and let itboil gently 'till it is reduced to two Quarts, ftrain it through a Hair Sieve into a clear Pot, then put in fix Ounces of Almonds blanched and beat fine, half a Pint of thick Cream, and Chyan Pepper to your Talle, have ready three fmall French Rolls made for the Purpofe, the iize of a fmall Tea Cup; if they are larger, they vn\\ not look well, and drink up too much of the Soup; blanch a few Jordan Almonds, and cut tliem lengthway, ftick them round the Edge of the Rolls flantway, then ftick them all over the Top of the Rolls, and put them in the Tureen; when difhed up pour the Soup upon the Rolls: Thefe Rolls look like a Hedge-hog: Some French Cooks give this Soup the Name of Hedge-hog Soup.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER.

*To make Onion Soup.

Boil eight or ten large Spanifh Onions in Milk and Water, change it three times j when they are quite foft, rub them through a Hair Sieve, cut an old Cock in Pieces and boil it for Gravy, with one blade of Mace, ftrain it, and pour it upon the Pulp of the Onions, boil it gently with the crumb of an old Penny Loaf grated into half a Pint of Cream; add Chyan Pepper and Salt to your Tafte: A few Heads of Afparagus or ftewed Spinage, both make it eat well and look very pretty: Grate a cruft of brovu Bread round the Edge of the Difh.

7a make Green Peafc Soup.

Shell a Peck of Peafe and boil them in Spring Water till they are foft, . then work them through a Hair Sieve, take the Water that your Peafe were boiled in, and put in a Knuckle of Veal, three flices of lean Ham, cut two Car- rots, a Turnip, and a few Beet Leaves Ihread (mail, add a little more Water to the Meat, -fet it over the Fire, and let it boil one Hour and a half then ftrain the Gravy into a Bowl ^nd mix it with the Pulp, and put in a little Juice of Spinage, which muft be beat and fqueezcd through a Cloth, put in as much as will make it look a pretty Colour, then give it a gentle boil, which will take oiF the tafte of the Spin- age, flice in the whiteft Part of a Head of Celery, put in a lump of Sugar the fize of a Walnut,

B take

10 The Experienced

take a flice of Bread and cut it in little fquare Pieces, cut a little Bacon the fame way, fry them a light brown in frefli Butter, cut a large Cabbage Lettice in Slices, fry it after the othcr^ put it ill the Tureen with the fried Bread and Bacon; have ready boiled as for eating, a Pblt of young Peafe, and put them in the Soup, witn a little chopped Mint if you like it, and pour it into your Tureen.

To make a Common Peafe Soup.

To one Quart of fplit Peafe, put four Qiiarts of foft Water, a little lean Bacon, or roaftlBeef Bones, wafh one Head of Celery, cut it and put it in with a Turnip, boil it till reduced to two Quarts, then work it through a-CuUendar with a wooden Spocm, mix a little Flour and • Water, and boil it well in the Soup, and flice in another Head of Celery; Qiy an Pepper and Salt to your Tafte; cut a flice of Bread m fmall Dice, fry them a light brown, and put theni in your Dilh, then poiu: the Soup upon it.

To make a Peafe Soup fir Lent.

Put three Pints of blue boiling .Peafe into five Quarts of foft cc4d Water, three Ancho- vies, mree Red Herrings, and two latge Onions, ftick in a Clove at each End, a Carrot and a Parfnip fliced in, with a bunch of Sweet Herbs, boil them all together 'till the Soup is thick, firain it through a Cullender, then flice in the white part of a Head of Celery, a good lump

of

English HOUSE-KEEPER. u

of Butter* a little Pepper and Salt, a flice of Bread toafted and butter'd well, and cut in lit- de Diamonds, i)ut it into the Dilh, and pour the Soup upon itj and a. little dried Mint if you choofe it.

-^ • - "^ ' riMii^ "I- I I

CHAP. II.

Objervattons on DrcfTing Fifh.

WHEN you fry any Kind of Fifli, wafh diem clean, diy them well with a Cloth, and duft them with Flour^ or rub theni with with Egg and Bread Crumbs j be fure your dripping Hogs-lard or Beef-fuet is boiling be- fore you put in your Fifli, they will fry nard and clear^ Butter is apt to bum them black, and make thcmfoftj when you have fried your Fifli, always lay them in a Di^ or Hair Sieve to drain, before you difli them up:. Boiled Fi£h fhould always' be wafhed and rabbed carefully with a little Vinegar, before they are put into the Water; boil all Sands of Fifli very flowly, and when they will leave the Bone they are enough; when .you take them up, fet you Fifli-plate over a Pan of hot Water to drain, and cover it with a Cloth or dofe co- ver, to prevent it from turning their Colour; fet your Fifli-plate in the infide of your Difli, ' and fend it up, and when you fry Parfley, be fure you pick it nicely, wafli it well, then dip it in cold Water, and throw it into a Pan of boiling fat, take it out immediately it will be very crifp and a fine green.

B2 To

J

1 2 The EXPERI ENCED

. 7'o drefs a Turtle « hundred Weight.

4

Cut oiF the Head, take care of the Blood, and take off all the Fins, lay them in Salt and Water, cut off the bottom Shell, then cut c^ the Meat that grows to it, (which is the Callepy or Fowl) take out the Hearts, Livers, and Lights, and put them by themfelves, take out the Bones and the Flefli out of the back Shell (which is the Callepa£h) cut the flelhy Part into Piecej^ about two Inches fquare, but leave the fat Part, which looks ^re.en, (it is c«dled the Moniieur) rub it firfl with iSalt, and wajQi it in feveral Waters . to make it come clean j then put in the Pieces that you took out, with three Bottles of Madeira Wine, and four Quarts of ^rong Veal Gravy, a Lemon cut in Slices, a bundle of Sweet Herbs, a Tea Spoonful of Chyan, fix Anchovies warned and picked clean, a quarter of an Ounce of beaten Mace, a Tea Spoonful of M^£hfoom Powder, and half a Pint of Effe^ce of Ham if you have it, lay over it a coarfe Paftc, fet it in the Oven for three Hours j when it comes out take off the Lid and fcum off the F^t, and brown it with a Salamander.

This is the Bottom Difli.

rheti blanch the Fins, cut them: off at the firft Joint, fry the firft Pinions a, fine brown, and put them into a Toffing Pan with two Quarts of ftrong brown Gravy^ a Glafs of Red Wine, and the Blood of the Turtle, a large Spoonful of Lejnon Pickle, the fame of Brown- ing.

^^

English HOUSE- KEEPER. 13

ing, two Spcx>nfuls of Mufliroom Catchup, Chyan and Salt, an Onibn ftuck with Cloves, and a bunch of Sweet Herbs; a little before it is enough, put in an Ounce of Morels, the fame of Truffles, ftew them gently over a flow Fire for two Hours; when they are tender, put them into another Toffing Pan, thicken your Gravy with Flour and Butter, and (train it upon them, give them a boil, and ferve them up.

This is a Corner Difli.

Then take the thick or large Part of the Fins, blanch thein in warm Water, and put them in a Tolling Pan, with three Quarts of llrong Veal Gtavy, a Pint of Madeira Wine, half a Tea Spoprifal of Chyan, . a little Salt, half a Lemon, a little beaten Mace, a iTea Spoonful of Mufli- room Powder, atidabunch of Sweet Herbs, let them ftew 'till quite tender, they will take two Hours at Ifeaft, then take them up into another Toffing Pan, ftrain your Gravy, and make it pretty thick with Flour and Butter, then put m a few boiled Forcemeat Balls, which muft be' mad« of the vealy Part of your Turtle, left out for that Purpofe, one Pint of frefli Mufh- rooms, if you cannot get them, pickled ones will do, and eight Artichoke-bottoms boiled tender, arid cut in quarters, fhake them over the Fire five or fix Minutes, then put in half a Pint of' thick Cream, with the Yolks of fix Eggs, beacen exceeding well, fhake it over the Fire again 'till it looks thick and white, but do not let it boil, difh lip your Fins with the: Balls, Muflv rooms, and Artichoke-bottoms over and round them. This is the Top Difh.

Then

14 The . EXPERI ENCED

Then take the Chicken Part, and cut it like Scotch CoUops, fry them a light brown, then put in a Quart of Veal Gravy, flew them gently a little more than half an Hour, and put to it the Yolks of four Eggs boiled hard, a few Morels, a icore of Oyfters, thicken your Gravy, it muft be neither white nor brown, biit a pretty Gravy Colour, fry fome Oj^fter Pg^tties and lay round it^ This is a Corner Biffi to anfwer the fmall Fins*

Then take the Guts, (which is reckoned the beft Part of the Turtle) rip them open, fcrape and walh them exceeding well, rub them well with Salt, wafh them through many Waters^ and cut them in Pieces two Inches long, then fcald tlie Maw or Paunch, take off the Skin, fcrape it well, cut it into Pieces about half an Inch ][>road and two Inches long, put fome of the filhy Part of your Turtle in it, let it over a flow Charcoal Fire, with two Quarts q£ Veal Gravy, a Pint of Madeira Wine, a little Mufhroom Catchup, a few Shalots, a little Chyan, half a a Lemon, and flew them gently four Hours, 'till your Gravy is almoil confumed, then thicken It with Flour, mixed with a little Veal Gravy, put in half an Ounce of Morels, a few Force- meat Balls, made as for the Fins -, difh it up, and brown it with a Salamander, or in the ^* Oven.

This is a Corner Dilh.

Then t^ke the Head, Ikin it and cut it in two Pieces, put it into a flew Pot with all the Bones, Hearts, and Lights to a Gallon of Water, or Veal

Broth

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 15

Broth, three or four blades erf Mace, one Shit- lot, a ilice of Beef beaten to Pieces, and a bunch of Sweet Herbs, fet them in a very hot Oven, and let it ftand an Hour at leaft, when it comes out fbain it into a Tureen for the Middle of the Table.

Then take the Hearts^ and Lights, chop them vei^ fine, put them in a Stew Pan, with i Pint of good Gravy, thicken it ^ and fervc it up, lay the Head in the Middle, fry the Liver, lay it round the Head upon the Lights^ garniih with whole flices of Lemon.

This is for the fourth Comer Difh.

N. B. The firft Courfe Ihould be of Turtle only, when it is drefled in this Mantier; but when it is with othei" Vidkuals, it ihould be in three different Difties, but this Way I have often drejQTed theni, and'have given great Satisfaction. Obferve to kill your Turtle, the Night before you want it, or veiy Early 'fteit Morning, that you may have all your Dilhes going on at a Time. Gravy for a Tuirtle a hundred Weight, will take two Legs of Veal, *and two Shanks of Beef.

To drefs a Cod s Head and Shoulders,

Take out the Gills and thp Blood clean from the Bone, wafli the Head very clean, ^ub over it a little Salt, and a Glafs of Allegar, then lay it on your Fifli Plate; when your Water boils, throw in a good handful of Salt, with a Glafs

of

i6 The Experienced

of Allegar, then put in your Fifli, and let it boil gently half an Hour; if it is a large one three Quarters; take it up very carefully, arid ftrip the Skin nicely off, fet it before a brilk Fire, dredge it all over with Flour, and bafte it well with Butter; when the froth begins to rife, throw over it fome very fine white Bread Crumbs, you muft keep bailing it all the Time to make it froth well; when it is a fine light brown, diUi it up, and garnilh it with a Le- mon cut in Slices, fcraped Horfe-radifh, Barber- ries, a few fmall Fiih fried and laid round it, or fried Oyfters, cut the Rowe and Liver in Slices, and lay over it a little of the Lobller out of the Sauce in lumps, and then ferve it.

To make Sauce for the Cod s Head.

Take a Lobfter, if it be alive, flick a Skew- er in the vent of the Tail, (to keep the Water out) throw a Handful of Salt in the Water; when it boils put in the Lobfter, and boil it half an Hour; if it has Spawn on, pick them off, and pound them exceeding fine^ in a Mar- ble Mortar, and put them into l$sli a Pound, of good melted Butter, then take the Meat out of your Lobfter, pull it in bits and put it in your Butter, with a Meat Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, and the fame of Walnut Catchup, a ilice of an End of Lemon, one or two flices of Horfe-radilh, as niuch beaten Mace as will lie, on a Six-pence, Salt and Chyan to your Tafte, boil them one Minute, then take out the Horfe- radifh and Lemon, and ferve it up in your Sauce Boat.

N. B.

tNGLista HOUSE-KEEPER. i^

N. B. If you can get no Lobfter, you may make Shrimps Cockle, or Mufcle Sauce the fame •way; if there can be no kind of Shell-fifli got, you then may add two Anchovies cut fmall, a Spoonful of Walnut Liquor, a large Onion ftuck with Cloves, ftraiti it and put it in the Sauce-boat.

Second fFny to drefi n Cod's Head.

¦

Take out the Gills and Blood clean front the Back-bone, walh it well, and put it on yourJPlate; when your Water boils, put in two Handfiils of Salt, and half a Pint of Al- legal-, it will make your Filh firmer, then put in the Cod's Head; if its of a middle fize it will take an Hour's boiling, then take it up, and ftrip off the Skin gently, dredge it well -with Flour, and lay lumps of Butter on it; if it fuits you better, you may fend it to the Oven, and if it is not brown all over, do it with a Salamander: Make your Gravy Sauce to it and ferve it up*

To drefs young Codlins like Salt Filli.

Take young Codlins, gut and dry them well with a Cloth, fill their Eyes full of Salt, throw a little on the Back-bone, and let them lie all Night, then hang them up by the Tail a Day or two; as you have occafion for them, boil them in Spring Water, and drain them well, difh them lip, and pour Egg SaUce on them, and fend them to the Table*

C To

l8 The EXPERTENCED

To drefs a Salt Cod.

Steep your fait Fifli in Water all Night, with a Glafs of Vinegar, it will fetch out the Saltf and make it eat like frefli Fifh, the next Day boil it, when it is enough, pull it in fleaks into your Difli, then pour Egg Sauce over it, or Parfhipa boiled ana beat fine, with Butter and Cream; fend it to the Table on a Water Plate, for it will foon grow cold.

To make £g^ Sauce yor a Sale Cod,

Boil four Eggs hard, firft half chop the Whites, th^n put in the Yolks, and chop them both together, but not very fqiall, put them into half a Pound of good melted Butter, and let; it boil up, then pour it on the Fiih.

<

To drefs Cod Sounds.

Steep your Soimds as you do the fait Cod, and boil them in a large Quantity of Milk and Water, when they are very tender and i^ite, take them up, and ^rain the Water out, then pour the Egg Sauce boiling hot over them, and lervc them up*

To drefs Cod Sounds Uh little Turkeys.

Boil your Sounds as for eating, but not IKX) much, take them up and lee them {land 'till they are quite cold, then make a Force- meat

I-

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 19

meat of chopped Oyfters, crumbs of Bread, a lump of Butter, Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, and the Yolks of two Eggs, fill your Sounds with it, and Ikewer them up in the fhape of a Tur- key, dien lard them down each Side, as you tvould do a Turkey's Breaft, dufl. them well widi Flour, and put them in a Tin Oven to loaft before the Fire, and bafte them well with Butter; when they are enough, pour on them Oyfter Sauce; three are furacient for a Side Dnh; garniih with Barberries: It is a pretty Side Dim for a large Table, for a Dinner in Lent.

To boil Salmon Crimp.

Scale your Salmon, take out the Blood, i^aih it well, and lay it on a Fifti Plate, put your Water in a FiQi Pan with a little Salt; when it boils put in your Filh for half a Mi- nute, then take it out for a Minute or two; when you have done it fo four times, boil it un- til it be enough; when you take it out of the Wh Pan, fet it over the Water to drain; cover it well with a clean Cloth dipped in hot Wa- ter; fry fome fmall Fiflies, or a few flices of Salmon, and lay round it: Garnifh with fcraped Horfe-radiflfi and. Fennel.

To make Sauce fir a Salmon*

Boil a bunch of Fennel and Parfley,, chop them fmall, and put it into fome good melted Butter, and fend it to the Table in a Sauce Boat, another with Gravy Sauce.

C2 To

The Experienced

To make the Gravy Sauce, put a little brown avy into a Sauce Pan, with one Anchovy, 'ea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a Meat Spoon- of Liquor from your Walnut Pickle, one two Spoonfuls of the Water that the Fiflx s boiled in, it giv^a it a pleafant flavour; a k of Horfe-radifli, a little Browning, and t, l^il them three or four Minutes, thicken, vith Flour and a good lump of ButtQr> zJXi^ lin it through a Hair Sieve. ^. B. This is a good Sauce for moft kinds, of

led Filh.

To boil a Turboc.

^Vash yourTurbot clean, if you let it lie the Water it will make it fof t, and rub it over th Allegar, it will make it firmer, then lay- )n your Fifli Plate, with the white Side up,

a Cloth over it, and pin it tight under your te, which will keep it from breaking, boil gently in hard Water, with a good deal of t and Vinegar, and fcum it well, or it will colour the Skin; when it is enough take it

and drain it, take the Cloth carefully off, i flip it on to your Difli, lay over it fried fters, or Oyfter Patties, fend in Lobfter .or avy Sauce in Sauce Boats: Garniih it with fp Parfley and Pickles.

>I. B. Don't put in your Filh 'till you,r Water Is*

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 21

To boil a Pike 'with a pudding in iJ>€ Belfy.

Take out the Gills and Guts, waftx it well,, then make a good Forcemeat of Oyfters ciiojy^ ped fine, the crumbs of half a Penny Loaf, a tew Sweet Herbs, .. and . a little Lemon Peel ihread fine, Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt to your Tafte, a good lump of Butter, the Yolks or two Eggs, mix them well together, and put them' in the Belly of your yi(h, fow it up, Ikewer k. round, put hard Water in your Fi(h Pan, add to it a Tea Cupful of Vinegar, and a little Salt; when it boils put in the Fifli; if it be of a middle Size, it will take half an Hour's bail- ing: Garniih it with Walnuts and pickled Barberries, ferve it up with Oyfter Sauce in a Boat, pour a little Sauce on the Pike; You may drefs a rqailed Pike the fame way.

To fteiv Carp ivhii^.

When the Carp are fcaled, gutted, and wafh- cd, put them into a Stew Pan, with two Quarts of Water, half a Pint, of White Wine, a little Mace, whole Pepper, and Sak, two Onions, a bunch of Sweet Herbs, a ftick of Horfe-radifli, co\^er the Pan clofe, let it Hand an Hour and a Half over a flow Stove, then put a Gill* of White Wine into a Sauce Pan, with two Ancho- vies chopped, an Onion, a little Lemon Peel, a quarter of a Pound of Butter rolled in Flour, a little thick Cream, and a large Tea Cupful of the Liquor the Carp was ftewed in,, boil

them

22 The Experienced

them a few Minutes, drain your Carp, add to the Sauce the Yolks of two Egg§, mixed with a little Cream; when it boils up fquee^f e in the Juice of half a Lemon j difli up your Carp, and pour your Sauce hot japon it.

To make White Rfti Sauce.

Was h two Anchovies^ put tiiem into a Sauce* Pan,, with one GUfs of White Wine, and two of Water, half a Nut'meg grated, and a little Le- xoon Peel; .when it has boiled five or jfix Mi- nutes, ftrain it through, a Sieve, add to it a Spoonful of White Wine Vinegar, thicken it a little, then put in near a Pound of Butter rolled ip Flour, boil it well, and pour it hot upon your Fiih.

To fiew Carp or Tench.

Gut and fca.le your Fifli, wafli aiid dry them well with a clean Cloth, dredge them well with Flour, fry them in drippings or fweet rendered Suet, until they are alight brown, and tfejKji put tl>em in a Stew Pan, with a Quait of Wi^^ter, and. one Quart of Red Wine, a Meat Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, another of Brown- ing, the fame of Walnut or Mum Catchup, a little Rlujihroom Powder, and Chyan to your Tafte, a large Onion ftuck with Cloves, and a ftick of Horfe-radifli, cover your Pan clofe up to keep in the Steam, let them ftew gently over a Stove Fire, till your Gravy is reduced to juft enough to cover your Fifli in the Difh, then

take

English HOUSE-KEEPER. ag

take the Fifh out, and put them on the Diih you intend for Table, fet the Gravy on the Fire, and thicken it with Flour and a large lump of Bmt^r, boil it a little, and fbain it ovor your ¥ifk: Gamilh them with pickled Muih* rooms and fcraped Horfe-radifh, put a hunch of ^cked Barberries, or a fprig of Myrtle in their Mouths, and fend them to the TaUe. It is a Top Dtih for a grand Entertainment

7a drefs a Smrgcon.

Take what fize of ar piece of Stutgeon you think proper, and ^a£h it clean, lay it all Night in Salt and Water, the next Morning take it out, rub it well with Allegar, and let it lie in jt for twa Hours, then have ready a Filh Ket^ lie full of boiling Water, with one Ounce of Bay Salt,, two large Oniotis, and a few fpri^s of Sweet Marjorum \ boil your Sturgeon 'till the Bones will leave the Fim, then take it up, taJsie the Skin c^, and flour it well, fet it be- fore the Fire, bafte it with freih Butter, and kt iit {land 'till it be a fine brown, then difk it ijp, and pour iilto the I>ifh the fame Samce asr rap the while Carp: Garnifh with crifp Parflcy and red Pickles. This is a proper Difb. for the Top or Middle.

Tq roajl large Eells or Lampreys uoith a Tldd-

ding in the Belly.

Skin your Eells or Laijipreys, cut off the Head, take the Guts out and fcrape the Blood

clean

mm

24 The^ ^EXPERIEI^CED

clean from the Bone, th^n make a good Fcwrce--^ meat of Oyfters or Shrimps chopped fmall, the crumbs of half a Penny Loaf, a little Nutmeg and Lemon Peel ihread fine, Pepper, Salt, and the Tolks of two Eggs, put them in the Belly of your Fifli, fow it up, and turn it round on your Difti, put over it Flour and Butter, pour a little Water in your Difli, and bake it in i moderate Oven; when it comes out take the Gravy from under it, and Ikim off the Fat, then ftrain it through a Hair Sieve, add to it a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, two of Brown- ing, a Meat Spoonful of Walnut Catchup, a Glafs of White, Wine, one Anchovy, and a nice of Lemon, let it boil ten Minutes, thicken it with Butter and Flour, fend it up in a Sauce Boat^ diih your Fifh: Garnifh it with Lemon and crifp Parfley.

This is a pretty Dilh for either Corner or Side

for a Dinner-

To boil Mackrel.

Gut your Mackrel and dry them carefully with a'- clean Cloth, then rub them flightly over witha little yinegar, and lay them ilraight on your Fifh Plate, (for turning them round of-* breaks them) put a little Salt in the Water, when it boils, put them into your Fifli Pan^ and boil them gently fiifteen Minutes, then take them up and drain them well, and put the Water that runs from them into a Sauce Pan, with two Tea Spoonfuls of Lemon Pickle, one Meat Spoonful of Walnut Catchup^ the

fame

'

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 2:5

fame of Browning, a Blade or two of Mace, one Anchovy, a Slice of Lemon, boil them all together a quartet of an Hour, then drain it through a Hair Sieve, and thicken it with Flour and Butter, fend it in a Sauce Boat, and Parfley Sauce in another, difli up your Fifli with the Tails in the Middle, garnim it with fcraped Horfe-raddiih and Ba

To boil Herrings.

Scale, gut, and waih your Herrings, dry them clean, and rub them over with a little Vinegar and Salt, Skewer them with their Tails in their Mouths, lay them on your Filh Plate^ when your Water boils put them in, they will take ten or twelve Minutes boiling, when you take them up, drain them over the Water, then turn the Heads into the Middle of your Difli, lay round them fcraped Horfe*raddifh, Parfley and Butter for Sauce.

To fry Herrings.

Scale, wafli, and dry your Herrings well, lay them feparately on a Board, and fet them to the Fire two or three Minutes before you want them, it will keep the Fifh from flicking to the Pan, duft them with Flour, when your Dripping or Butter is boiling hot put in your Filh, a tew at a Time, fry them over a brilk Fire, when you have fried them all, fet the Tails up one againft another in the Middle of the Difli, then fry a large Handful of Parfley

D * crifp.

2^ Hie EXPEEIEKCBD

crifp, take ii out before it lofes its Ck>lour, kty ic rouad them, aa4 Pi^r^y Sauce m a Boac; or if you like Onioas better fry thevi, lay ^om& lound your Fiih, aod make Onion Sauce £qf them; or you mny cut off the Heads af^erthey are fried, chop them and put them into a Sauce-pan, with Ale, Pepper, Salt, and an An-^ chovy, thicken it witJji Flour and Butter, ftrain it, then put it in a Sauce Boat.

To bake Herrings.

When you have cleaned your Herrings as above, lay them on a Board, take a little ^ck and Jamaica Pepper, a few Cloves, and a good deal of Salt, mix them together, then rub it all over the Fifli, lay th^m ftraight in a Pot, cover them with Allegar, tie a ftrong Paper over tia« {\ot, and bake them in a moderate Oven, if your Allegar be good, they will keep two or three Months, you fiifly Wt them either hot or cold.

To boil Scate or Ray,

Clean your Scate or Ray very well, and cut k in long nanow Pieces, then put it in boiling Water with a little Salt in it, when it has boiled a quarter of an Hour take it out, flip the Skin of^ then put it into your Paja again, with a little Vinegar, and boil it 'till enough; when you take it up, iiet it ov^r the Water to drain, and cover itclofe up, and when youdifliit, be as quick as piaflible, for it foon goes cold, pour

over

'

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 27

6Tcr it Cbckle, Shrimp, or Mufcle Sauce, lay aver it Oyfter Pitties, garnifh it with Barberries and Horfe-raddifh.

To fry Soles.

Skin yotir Sok& as you do Eels, but keep on their Heads, mb them over with an Egg, and flfew ovet them Bread Crumbs, fry them over a brilk Fire in Hogs-Iard a light Brown, ferve them up with good melted Butter, and garnifh it with green Pickles.

To marinate SolcSt

Bo I L th^m iti Sah and Waten bone and drain fhem, lay them on a Difli with the Belly up, boil fome Spihage and pound it in a Mortar, then boil four Eggs hard, chop the Whites and Yolks feparate, lay green, white, and yellow amongil the Soles, ferve them up with melted Butter in a Boat.

7o hail Haddocks or WhitiDgs,

Gut, and walh your Haddocks or Whitings, dry them With a Cloth, and rub a little Vine- gar over them, it will keep the Skin on better, duft them well with Flour, rub your Gridiron with Butter, and let it be very hot when you lay the Fifti on, or they will ftick, mm them two or three Times on the Gridiron, when enough, ferve them up, and lay Pickles round

Pa thcm^

28 The Experienced

them, with plain melted Butter, or Cockle Sauce, they are a pretty. Difh for Supper.

Afecond Way,

When you have cleaned your Haddocks or Wl>itings, as above, put them in a Tin Oven, and fet them before a quick Fire, when the Skins begin to rife take it off, beat an Egg, rub it over them with a Feather, and ftrew over them a few Bread Crumbs, dredge them well with Flour, when your Gridiron is hot rub it well with Butter or Suet, it muft be very hot before you lay the Fi(h on, when you have turned them, rub a little cold Butter over them, turn them as yoiu: Fire requires until they are enough and a little Brown; lay round them Cockles, Mufcles, or red Cabbage, you may either have Shrimp Sauce or melted Butter*

To fry Smelts •r Sparlings.

Draw the Guts out at the Gills, but leave in the Melt or Roe, dry them with a Cloth, beat an Egg and rub it oyer them with a Feather, then Itrew Bread Crumbs over them, fry them with Hogs-lard or rendered Beef Suet, when it is boiling hot put in your Fifli, Ihake them a little, and fry them a nice Brown, drain them in a Sieve, when you difli them put a Bafon in the Middle of your Difli with the Bottom up, lay the Tails of your Fifli on it, fry a Handful of Parfley in the Fat your Fifli was fryed in, take it out of Water as you fry it, and it will

keep

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 29

keep its Colour and crifp fooner, put a little on the Tails, and lay the reft in Lumps round the Edge of the Difh, ferve it up with good melted Butter for Sauce.

To fry Perch or Trout.

When you have fcaled, guted, and walhed your Perch or Trout, dry them well, then lay them feparately on a Board before the Fire two Minutes before you fry them, dull them well widi Flour, and fry them a fine Brown, in roail Drippings or rendered Suet, ferve them up with melted Butter and crifped Parfley.

To drefs Perch in Water Sokey.

Scale, gut, and wafli your Perch, put Salt in your Water, when it boils put in tne Fi£h, w^ith an Onion cvit in Slices, you muft feparate it into round Rinejs, a Handful of Parfley pick- ed and wafhed clean, put in as much Milk as will turn the Water white, when your Fifh is enough, put them in a Soup Difli, and pour a little of the Water over them with the Parfley and the Onions, then ferve it up with Butter and Parfley, in a Boat, Onions may be omitted if you pleafe. You may boil Trout the fame Way.

To boil Eels*

Skin, gut, and take the Blood out of your Eels, cut off their Heads, dry them, and turn

them

^ The Experienced

them rotmd on your Tiih Plate, boil theta in Salt and Water, and make Pariley Sauce fcKr them.

To pitch-cock Eels.

Skin, gut, and wafh your Eels, then dry them with a Cloth, fprinkle them with Pepper, Salt, and a little dried Sage, turn them back- vrzrd and forward, and Skewer them, rub your Gridiron with Beef . Silet, broil them a good Brown, put them on your Difli with good teelted Butter, and lay round fried Parfley,

To broil Eels.

When you have Ikined and cleasifed your Eels as bcroi-e, rub them with the Yolke of an Egg, ftrew over them Bread Crumbs, ehoped Pariley, Sage, Pepper and Salt, bafte them well with Butter, and fet them in a Dripping-pan, roaft or broil them on a Gridiron, ferve them up with Pariley and Butter for Sauce.

To boil Flounders, and all Kinds ofTht Fifh.

Cut off the Fins, and nick the brown Side under the Head, then take out the Guts, and dry them with a Cloth, boil them in Salt and Water, make either Gravy, Shrimp, Cockle, or Mufcle Sauce, and garniih it with red Cabbage.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 31

T9fiew Oyftcrs, (mi all Sorts of^elX Fifti.

When you have opened your Oyftcre, put their Liquor into a Toflinig Pan, with a little beaten Mace, thicken it with Flour and Butter, boU it throe or four Minutes, toaft 4 Slice ol white Bread, and cut it into ihree-comered Pieces, lay them round your Difli, put in a Spoonful of good Cream, put in your Oyfters, and ihake them xoujod in your Pan, you i^ufl not let them boil, for if they do it will make them hard and look - fmall, ferve them up in ^ litde Soup Difh or Plate.

N,B. You may ftew Cockles, Mufcles, or any Shell Fifla die fame Way.

Tafioflop Oyfters.

Wheh your Oyilers are opened, pot them in a Bafon, and wafh them out of their own Liquor, put fome in your ScoUoped-fhells, ftrew over them a few Bread Crumbs, and lay a Slice of Butter on them, then more Oyftcrs, Bread Crumbs, and a Slice of Butter on the Top, put them into a Dutch Ovai to brown, and fenre them up in the Shells.

To fry Oyfters.

Take a quarter of a Hundred of large Oyf- ters, beat the Yolks of two Eg^s, add to it a little Nutmeg, and a Blade of Mace pounded,

^z The Experienced

a Spoonful of Flour, and a little Salt, dip in your Oyfters, and fry them in Hogs-lard a light Brown, if you chufe you may add a little Parfley Ihread fine.

N. B. They are a proper garnifli for Cods- Head, Calves-head, or moft made Diflies.

To make Oyfter Loaves.

Take fmall French Rafps, or you may make little round Loaves, make a round Hole in the Top, fcrape out all the Crumbs, then put your Oyfters into a Tolling Pan, with the Liquor and Crumbs that came out of your Rafps or Loaves, and a good Lump of Butter, ftewthem together five or fix Mmutes, then put in a Spoonful of good Cream, fill yjour Rafps or Loaves, lay the bit of Cruft carefully on agaio^ fet them in the Oven to crifp.

Three are enough for a Side Difh.

To boil Lobfters.

Take your Lobfter, and put a Skewer in the Vent of the Tail, to prevent the Water from get- ting into the Body of the Lobfter, put it into a Pan of boiling Water with a little Salt in it, if it be a large one it will take half an Hour's J)oiling, when you take it out, put a Lump of Butter in a Cloth, and rub it over, it will ftrike the Colour and make it look bright.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 33 To roaft Lobfters.

Half boil your Lobfter as before, rub it •well with Butter, and fet it before the Fire, bafte it all over 'till the Shell looks a dark Brown, ferve it up with good melted Butter.

To pickle Sturgeon.

Cut your Sturgeon into what iize Pieces you pleafe, wafli it well, and tie it with Mats, to every three Quarts of Water, put one Quart of old llrong Beer, a Handful of Bay Salt, and double the Quantity of common Salt, one Ounce of Ginger, two Ounces of Black Pepper, one Ounce of Cloves, and one of Jamaica Pepper, boil it 'till it will leave the Bone, then take it up, the next Day put in a Quart of ftrong Ale Allegar, and a little Salt, tie it down with flrong Paper, and keep it for Ufe. - ^Don't put your Sturgeon in 'till the Water boils.

To pickle Salmon Newcaftle JVay.

m

Take, a Salmon about twelve Pounds, gut it, then cut off the Head, and cut it a-crofs in what Pieces you pleafe, but don't fplit it, fcrape tlie Blood from thfe Bone, and warn it well out, then tie it a-crofs each Way, as you do Stur- geon, fet on your Fifh Pan, with two Quarts of Water, and three of ftrong Beer, half a Pound of Bay Salt, and one Pound of common ^alt, when it boils fcum it well, then put in as

E much

54 Tl^e Experienced

much Fifli as your Lic^uor will cover, and when it it is enough take ifi carefully out, left you ftrip off the Skin, and lay it on Earthen Diihes; when you have done all your Filh, let it Hand 'til;! the next Day^ put it into Pots, add to the Liquor three Quarts of ftrong Beer Allegar, half an Ounce of Mace, tlie fskmt of Cloves and Black Pepper, one Ounce of Long Pepper, two Ounces of White Ginger iliced, boil them well together half an Hour, then pour it boil- ing hot upon your Fifh, wh^n cold cover it wcU with ftrong Brown Paper.- ^This will keep a whole Year.

To fickle Oyfters.

Open the largeft and fineft Oyfters you can get, whole and clean from the Shell, wafti them in their own Liquor, let it ftand to fettle, then pour it from the Sediment into a Sauce Pan, put to it a Glafs of Lisbon Wine, as much White Wine Vinegar as you had Oyfter Li- quor, three or four Blades of Mace, a Nutmeg meed, a few White Pepper Corns, and a little Salt, boil it five or fix Minutes, fcum it, then put in your Oyfters, fimmer them ten or twelve Minutes, take them out, and put them in nax- row-top'd Jars, when they are cold pour over them rendered Mutton Suet, tie them down with a Bladder, and keep them for Ufe.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER, g;

To collar Mackarel.

Gut, a«d flit your Mackarel down the Belly, cut off the Head, take out the Bones, take Care, y^u don't cut it in Holes, then lay it flat upon its Back, feaibn it with Mace, Nutmeg, Bej>per and Salt, and a Handful of Pariley ihread fine, ftrew it over them, roll them tight, and tie them well feparately in Cloths, boil them gently twenty Minutes in Vinegar, Salt and Water, then take them out, put them into a Pot, pour the Liquor on them, or the Cloth will ftick to the Filh, the next Day take the Cloth aS your Fifli, put a little more Vinegar to the Pickle, keep them for Ufe; when you fend them to the Table, gamifti with Fennel, or Parfley> and put fome of the Liquor under them.

To pickle Mackarel.

Wash Mid .gut your Mackarel, then fkewer them round with their Tails in their Mouths, bind them with a Fillet to kpep them from breaking, boil them in Salt and Water, about ten Minutes, then take them carefully out, put to the Water a Pint of Allegar, two or three Blades of Mace, a little Whole Pepjjer, and boil it all together, when cold pour it on the Filh, and tie it down clofe.

E 2 To

36 The Experienced

To pot Salmon.

Let your Salmon be quite frefh, fcale, and wafli it well, and dry it with a Cloth, fplit it up the Back and take out the Bone, feafon it well with White Pepper and Salt, a little Nut- meg and Mace, let it lie two or three Hours, then put it in your Pot, with half a Pound of Butter, tie it down, put it in the Oven and bake it an Hour, when it comes out, lay it on a flat Difli that the Oil may run from it, cut it to the fize of your Pots, lay it in Layers 'till you fill the Pot, with the Skin upward, put a Board over it, lay on a Weight to prefs it 'till cold, then pour over it clarified Butter j when you cut it, the Skin makes it look ribbed, you may fend it to the Table either cut in Slices, or in the Pot,

A fecond Way.

When you have any cold Salmon left, take the Skin off^, and Bone it, then put it in a Mar- ble Mortar, with a good deal of clarified But- ter, feafon it pretty high with Pepper, Mace and Salt, fliread a little Fennel very Imall, beat them all together exceeding fine, then put it clofe down into a Pot, and cover it with clari- fied Butter.

f

f

1

i;

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 37 To pot Smelts or Sparlings.

1 ¦

Draw out the Guts with a Skewer under the Gills, the Melt or Roe muft be left in, dry them well with a Cloth, feafon them with Salt, Mace, and Pepper, lay them in a Pot with half a Pound of melted Butter over them, tie them down, and bake them in a flow Oven three quarters of an Hour; when they are almoft cold take them out of the Liquor, put them into oval Pots, cover them with clanfied But- ter, and keep them for Ufe,

To pickle Smelts or Sparlings,

Gut them with a Skewer under the Gills, but leave the Melt or Roe in, dry them with a Cloth, and fkewer their Tails in their Mouths, put Salt in your Water, when it boils put in your Fifli for ten Minutes, then take them up, put to the Water a Blade or two of Mace, a few Cloves, and a little Allegar; boil them all to- gether, and when its cold put in your Fifh, and keep them for Ufe.

To collar Eels,

Case your Eel, cut off the Head, flit open the Belly, take out the Guts, cut off the Fins, take out the Bones, lay it flat on* the Back, grater over it a fmall Nutmeg, two or three Blades of Mace beat fine, a little Pepper aiid Salt, ftrew over it a Handful of Parfley fhread

fine,

38 The £xp£iii£NC£t)

fine, with a few Sage Leaves, roll it up tig^ht in a Cloth, bind it well; if it be of a middle Size, boil it in Salt and Water three quarters of an Hour, hang it up all Night to drain, add to the Pickle a Pint of Vinegar, a few Pepper Corns, and a Sprig of Sweet Marjoram, boil it ten Minutes, and let it ftand 'till the next Day, take off the Cloth, and put your Eels into the Pickle, you may fend them whole on a Plate, or cut them in Slices: Qarniih with green Parlley* - ^Lampreys are done the fame way.

To pickle Cockles.

Wash your Cockles clean, put them in a Sauce Pan, cover them clofe, fet them over the Fire, fhake them 'till they open, then pick them out of the Shells, let the Liquor fettle 'till it be clear, then put in the fame Quantity of Wine Vinegar, and a little Salt, a Blade or two of Mace, boil them together, and pour it on your Cockles, and keep them in Bottles for Ufe. - ^You muft pickle Mufcles the fame way.



To pot Chars.

Cut off the Fins, and Cheek-part, of each Side of the Head of yoiu Chars, rip them open, take out the Guts, and the Blood from the Back-bone, dry them well in a Cloth, lay them on a Board, and throw on them a good deal of Salt, let them ftand all Night, then fcrape it gently off them, and wipe them exceedinj well with a Cloth, pound Mace, Cloves an^

Nutmeg,

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 39

Nutmeg very fine, throw a little in the InfiJc of them, and a good deal of Salt and Pepper (Ml the Oudide, put them clofe down in a deep Pot; with their Bellies up, with plenty of cla- rified Butter over them, fet them in the Oven, and let them ftand for three Hours; when they come out, pour what Butter you can off clear, lay a Board over them, and turn them upfide- down, to let the Gravy run from them, fcrape die Sdt and Pepper very carefully off, and fea- fon them exceeding well both Infide and Out with the above Seafoning, lay them clofe into broad thin Pots for that Purpoie, vnth the Backs up, then cover them well with clarified But- ter; keep them in a cool dry Place.

To Tot Eels.

Skik, gut, and clean your Eels, cut them in Pieces about four Inches long, then feafon them with Pepper, Salt, beaten Mace, and a little dried Sage rubbed very fine, rub them well with your Seafoning, lay them in a brown Pot, put over them as much Butter as vnM co- itr tnem, tie them down with a ftrong Paper, fct them in a quick Oven for an Hour and a Half, take them out, when cold put them into fmall Pots, and cover them with clarified Butter.



1 h B. You may pot Lampreys the fame Way.

To

jp The Experienced

V

To pot Lobilers»

Take the Meat out of the Claws and Belly of a boiled Lobfter, put it in a Marble Mortar, with two Blades of Mace, a little White Pep- per ^nd Salt, a Lump of Butter the Size of half an Egg, beat them all together 'till they come to a P^e, put one half of it into your Pot, take the Meat out of the Tail-part, lay it in the Middle of your Pot, lay on it the other half of your Paile, prefs it clofe down, pour over it clarified Butter, a quarter of an Inch thick.

N. B. To clarify Butter, put your Butter into a clean Sauce Pan, fet it over a flow Fire, when its melted, fcum it, and take it off the Fire, let it ftand a little, then pour it over your Lob- fters, take Care you do not pour in the Milk which fettles to the Bottom ot the Sauce Pan.

To pot Shrimps.

Pi CK the fineft Shrimps you can get, feafon them with a little beaten Mace, Pepper, and Salt to your Tafte, and with a little cold Butter, pound them all together in a Mortar .'till it comes to a Pafte, put it down in fmall Pots, and pour over them clarified Butter.

To pickle Shrimps.

Pick the fineft Shrimps you can get, and put them into cold AUegar and Salt, put them

into

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 41

ioto little Bottles, Cork them clofe, and keep them for Ufe.

^r^^

CHAP. in. Ohfirvatiotts on Roafting and Boiling.

WHEN you boil any Kind of Meat, par- ticularly Veal, it requires a gi eat deal of Care and Neatnefs; be fiu^e your Copper i» very clean and well tinn'd, fill it a8 full of foft Water as is neceflfary, duft your Veal well with fine Flour, put it into your Copper, fet it over a large Fire; fome chufes to put in Milk to make it White, but I think it is better without; if your Water happens to be the Icaft hard it curdles the Milk, and gives the Veal a Brown Yellow caft, and often nange in Lumps about the Veal, fo will Oatmeal, but by dulling your Veal, and putting it into the Water when cold, it prevents tht foulnefs of the Water from hanging upon it; when the Scum begins to rife take it clear off, put on your Cover, let it boil in Plenty of Water as flow as poffible, it will make ?your Veal rife and plump: A* Cook cannot l>e guilty of a greater Error than to let aay Sort ot Meat boil taft, it hardens the Out- fide before the Infide i^ warm, and difcolours it, efpecialiy Veal; for Inftance, a Leg of Veal twelve Pounds Weight, will require three Hours and a half boiling, the flower it boils the whiter and plumper it will be; when you boil Mutton or Beef, obferve to dredge them

F well

42 The Experienced

well with. Flour before you. put them into the Kettle of cold Water, keep it covered, and take off the Scum; Mutton or Beef don't re- quire fo much boiling, uor is it fo great a Fault if they are a little ihort, but Veal, Pork, or Lamb, is not fo wholefome if they are not boiled enough; a Leg of Pork will require half an Hour more boiling than a Leg of Veal of the fame Weight; when you boil Beef or Mutton, you may allow an Hour for every four Poimd Weight; it is the beft Way to put in your Meat when the Water is cold, it gets warm to the Heart before the Outfide grows hard, a Leg of Lamb four Pounds Weight will require an Hour and half boiling.

When you road any Kind of Meat, it is a very good Way to put a little Salt and Water in your Dripping Pan, bafte your Meat a litdc with it, let it dry, then duft it well with Flour, bafte it, with frefh Butter, it will make your Meat a better Colour; obferve always to have a bri£k: clear Fire, it will prevent your Meat from dazing, and the Froth from falling, keep it a good Diftance from the Fire, if the Meat is fcorched, the Outfide is hard, and prevents the Heat from penetrating into the Meat, and will apneat enough before it be little more than half done. Time, Diftance Bafting often, and a clear Fire, is the beft Method I can pre- fcribe for roafting Meat to Perf edUon; vmtn the Steam draws near the Fire, it is a Sign of its being enough, but you will be the hcSt Judge of that fxom the Time you put it down.

Be

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 43

Be careful when you roaft any Kind of Wild Foivl, to keep a clear brifk Fire, roaft them a light Brown, but not too much; it is a great Fault to roaft them 'till the Gravy runs out of them, it takes off the fine Flavour, - ^Tame Fowls requires more roafting, they are a lone Time berore they are hot through, and muft be often bafted to keep up a ftrong Froth, it makes them rife better, and a finer Colour.- Pigs and Geefe fhould be roafted before a good Fire, and turned quick. - ^Hares and Rabbits requires Time and Care, to fee the Ends are roafted enough; when they are half roafted, cut the Neck Skin, to let out the Blood, or when they are cut up, they often appear bloody at the Neck.

To roaft a Pig.

Stick your Pig juft above the Breaft-bone, run your Knife to the Heart, when it is dead, put it in cold Water for a few Minutes, then rub it over with a little Rofin beat exceeding fine, or its own Blood, put your Pig into a Pale of fcalding Water half a Minute, take it out, lay it on a clean Table, pull off the Hair as quick as poffible, if it does not come clean off, put it in again, when you have got it all clean off, wafli it in warm Water, then in two or three cold Waters, for fear the Rofin Ihould tafte, take off the four Feet at the firft Joint, make a Slit down the Belly, take out all the Entrails, put the Liver, Heart and Lights, to the Pettitoes, waih it well out of cold Water,

F 2 dry

44 The .ExpEHifiUciD

dry it exceeding well -with a Cloth^ hang it up, and when you roaft it, put in a little ihrcad Sage, a Tea Spoonful of Black Pepper, two of Sah, and a Cruft of Brown Bread, Spit your Pig, and few it up, lay it down to a hnfk clear Fire, with a Pig Plate hung in the Middle of the Fire j when your Pig is warm, put a Lump of Butter in a (Uoth, rub your Pig often with, it while it is roafting; a large one will take ma Hour and half: When your Pig is a fint Brown, and the Steam draws near the Fire, take a clean Cloth, rub your Pig quite dry, then rub it well with a little cold Butter, it will help to crifp it, then take a ffiarp Knife, cutoff" the Head, and take off the Collar, then take off the Ears and Jaw-bone, fplit the Jaw in two, when you have cut the Pig down the Back, which muft be done before you draw the Spit out, then lay your Pig Back to Back on wnnrTiiih^ and the Jaw on each Side, the Ears 1 Shoulder, and the Collar at the Shoul* id pour in your Sauce, and fcrrc it up: 1 with a Cruft of Brown Bread graterea.

To make Sauce fir a Hg.

p the Brains a little, then put in a Tea of White Gravy, with the Gravy that u of the Pig, a little Bit of Anchcrvy, ar half a Pound of Butter, with as much , s will thicken the Gravy, a Slice of Lc- . Spoonful of White Wine, a little Caper and Salt, fliake it over your Fire, and t into your Diflij fome like Cujrants, boU

English H0USE-K£EPER. 4/

boil i few tnd feod them in a Tea Saucer with a Glafis of Currant Jelly in the Middle of it. .

Afeamd JFay to make Pig Sauce-

Cut all the Oudides of a Penny Loaf, then cut it into very thin Slices, put it into a Sauce Pan of cold Watec, with an Onion^ a few Pcp- er Corns, and a little Salt, boil it until it be a ne Pulp, th^ft beat it well, put in a quarter of a Pound of Butter, and two Spoonfuls of thick Cream, make it hot, and put it into a fiafon.

I

To dr^efs a Pigs Pettitoes.

Taice up the Heart, Liver, and Lights when diey have boiled ten Minutes, and fhread dbcm pretty fmali, but let the Feet boil till they arc pretty tender, then take them out and fplit them $ thicken your Gravy with Flour and Bior- ter, put in your Mincemeat, a Slice of Lemon, a Spoonful of White Wine, a little Salt, and boil it a little, beat the Yolk of an Egg, add to it two Spoonfuls of good Cream, and a lit- tle grated Nutmeg, put it in yaut* Pettitoes, ibake it over the Fire, but don't let it boil: Lay Sippetis round your Bifli, pour in your Mince- meat, lay the Feet over them the Skin-fide up, and feted them to the Table.

7b hoil a Goofe v)Ub Onion Sauce.

Take your Goofe ready drefs'd, fmge it and pour over it a Quart of boiling Milk, let it lye

in

46 The EXPERI ENCED

in it all Night, then take it out and dry it ex- * ceeding well with a Cloth, feafon it with Pep- per and Salt, chop fmall a large Onion, a Handftil of Sage Leaves, put them into your Goofe,,few it up at the Neck and Vent, hang it up by the Legs till the next Day, then put it into a Pah of cold Water, cover it clofe, and let it boil Howly one Hour.

To ftev) Goofe Giblets. '

.Cut your Pinions in two, the Neck in four Pieces, flice the Gizzard, clean it well, Hew thena in two Quarts of Water, or Mutton Broth, with a Bundle of Sweet Herbs, one Anchovy, a few Pepper Corns, three or four Cloves, a Spoonful of Catchup, and an Onion; when the Giblets are tender, put in a Spoonful of good Cream, thicken it with Flour an J Butter, ferve them up in a Soup Difh, and lay Sippets round it;

To roaft a Gieen Goofe.

When your Goofe is ready drefs'd, put in a ^od Lump of Butter, fpit it, lay it down, Imgeit well, dull it with Flour, bafte it well with frefli Butter, bafte it three or four diflfer- ent times with coltl Butter it will make the Flefh rife better than if you was to bafte it out of the Dripping Pan \, if it is a large one it will take three quarters of an Hour to roaft it; w^hen you think it is enough, dredge it with Flour, bafte it 'till it is a fine froth, and your

Goofe

English- HOUSE-KEEPER. 47

Goofe a nice brown, and difh it up with a lit- tle brown Gravy under it: Gamilli with a Cruft of Bread grated round the Edge of your Diih.

To maie Sauce fir a Green Goofe.

I •

Take fome melted Butter, put in a Spoon- ful of the Juice of -Sorrel, a little Sugar, a few coddled Goofeberries, pourir into your Sauce Boats, and fend it hot to the Table.

To roaft a Stubble Goofe.

Chop a few Sage Leaves, and two Onions very fine, mix them with a good Lump of But- ter, a Tea Spoonful of Pepper and two of Salt, put it in your Goofe, then fpit it and lay it down, fiiige it well, dull it with Flour; when it is thoroughly hot bafte it with freQi Butter: If it be a large one it will require an Hour and a half before a good clear Fire; when it is enough, dredge and bafte it, pull out the Spit, pour in a little boiling Water.

To make Sauce ySr a Goofe,

Pare, core, and ilice your Apples, put them in a Sauce Pan, with as much Water as will keep them from burning, fet them over a veiy flow Fire, keep them clofe covered till they arc all of a Pulp, then put in a Lump o^ Butter, and Sugar to your tafte, beat them well, and fend them to the Table in a China Bafon.

To

48 The Experienced

To hoil Ducks -with Onion Sauce.



Scald and draw your Ducks, put them in warm Water for a few Minutes^ then take them out, put them in an Earthen Pot, pour over them ar Point of boiling Milk, let them lie in it two or three Hours; when yoii take them out dredge them well with Flour, put them in a Copper of cold Water, put on your Cover^ let them 1x)il flowly twenty Minutes, then take them out, and fnxother them with Onion Sauce*

To make Onion Sauce.

Bo I L eight or ten large OniOns, change the Water two or three Timea while they are boil- ing, when enough, chop tliem on a "1>oard to keep them from going a bad Colour, put them in a Sajice Pan with a quarter of a Pound of Butter, two SpoonftiLs of thick Cream, boil it a little, and pour it over the Ducks*

To roaft Ducks.

When you have killed and drawn your Ducks, fhread one Onion, and a few Sage Xeavcs, put them into your Ducks with Pep- per and Salt, fpit, fingc, and dufl: them with Elour, bafte them with Butter; if your Fire be very hot they will be roafted in twenty Mi- nutes, the quicker they are roafted the better they eat J juft before you draw them, dull: them with Flour, and bafte them with Butter, put

them

^^"

f

Engl«k~. HOUSE-XEEPER. 49

them on % D^, have ready jmxt Oiaxf made of the Gizzaf^aad Pinions^ a Jorge BUde of Mace,''ii few Pepper Corns, .a .l^xoodft^ df Catchu ^ die fame of Brooming, aTeaSftooa- fal of LemotL Pickle, and one Onion^ ftndn It, yo\xt it on joatT^iSa, andfendOaJoaSswici^.iki a A)at.

. Tq Boil a Turkey v/hb Oyftcr Saace.

t.E'r ycmr Turkey have no Meat ihcDay^lae'-

fcreycMi kill it, v^n you are gbihg to ^ill it

^ive it a Spoonful p^ Allegar, it wm make' it

white and eat tender; when you have kiikd it

hang it up b;^ the Legs for four or five Days

at leaft^ wneikyou have plucked it draw it at the

Rump, if you can take the Breaft-bone out

nitfciy it will lp(*; miich better, cut off the

Legs; i^ut tlve txiA^ d^ tke Hiighs into the

Body tor the Turkey, ikcwer them down,' an4

lie them with a String, cut off the Hedd ind

Meek, thetk grate a Pen&y 'L6af/ chdp a Ibore

or more of Oyfters fine, Ibreida Jittle iLemon

l**el, Nutmeg, Tcpper, aiidi&ilc to your Pilate^

mix it up in^ a light f or^meaC witb aquar«-

«r of a Pound oi^ Butter, a Spoonful iDtJtwO

of Cream, and three Eggs^ (Uiff the Crariv witln

It, and make ^he reft U^to-Ballsiaiid J>otl:chenai,

few up the Turkey, dredge it well with Pknu^>,

put it into a Kettle of cold Water, cover it, and

let it over rfieslfitey when tli^ ^cuW;. begins Jo

rife take it oiF, put on your Cover, let it boil

very ilowly for hott^ a«i * Hour,: then taire X)ff

i^ur Kettki, andJt^e^ iodoie covesred^ if it be

^ ' ' ^ G of

.jTo .;: The . ExPEAiiBNcan

. of a Middle -Size, l^t itrftand' half axi Hour: in theliotWatec,;tt^e Steam being kept in.-vriU fteVrJti enough, make it rife, keep the Skin whok, cinder, and very white; when yotidilh it iup,: ppur over, it a' little of your Oyfter Sattce,

. lay.yoAlr Balk round it, and ferve it with the reft of your Sauce in a Boat: Gamiih with Lemon and Barberries.

N. B. Obferve to fet on your Turkey in time,

dteat itiTOAy ftcW as above; it is, the beft Way

:I evct found to boil one to Perfeftion; wlien

: you are going to diih it up, fet it over the Fire

tci make it quite hot.

w B.

: To make Sauce for a Turkey.

As. you open your Oyfters, put a Pint into a B^fon^ warn them out of their iLiqiior, and iput them in another Bafbn; when the.LiqucM- Ss. fettled,, pour it» cloan off into a Sauce Pan, 5;mh a little White' Gravy, a Tea Spoonful of JLemon Pickle, thicken it with Flour. and a ^oodlLump ofJRUtter, boil it three or iow •Minutes, put in: a Spoonful, of good. thick Cream, put in youcOy Iters, keep ihaking them dver the, Fire, 'till.they are quit^ hot, but don't jet them IkhI, it .t?ill make them h^urd andlook .littlej f." . >. // ¦ i •

••••.¦,"• • •, / •; ., ' • ' ^, • . ¦; . •

<^AJhondJF^ to make SaoKc.Jbr a Turkey.

I.J. n i

I • dif t*n a Bcragrend of a Neck of Veal in Pieces, put ihcm itt a Sauce JPan^ with: two or three

«; Blades

I

English HOUSE-KEEPER.

Bhdes of Mace, one Anchovy, a few Sticks CtUery, a little Ghyan and Salt, a Qlafs White White, a Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, Tea SpoonfuJ of Mnlhroom Powder or Gate up^ a <^art of "Water, put on your Cover; a Id: it hoU lintil it be reduced. to a Pint; ftrs ity and thicken it with a qn^ter of a Pouiid Butter xolled in Hour, boil it a little, jput a.SpoQinful of ^ thick .Creanx, .^d pour ' it ro^ the Turkey.

To roaji a Turkey.

When you have drefledyour^TurkeyasI fdreytrufs its Hdaddown to.t ie Legs, then ma ydurf Forcemeat y take the Cruinbs'af a^.Pdn Lpaf, a quarter, of a Pound of Beef Suit flirc fine, .a little Saufkge^meat otr Veal fciraped a potmd^ exceeding' fine. Nutmeg, Pepper,, a Salt to your Palatc;i.mix it up lightly with th; Eg[gs,, ftuff the Craw with it, fpit it, and la^j down a;good ' diilance from the Fire, keep dear and brifk, ^^^ duft, and bafte itieve times with cold l^ttei;, it makes ) the >Fi?c ftronger than bafting it with the hot out of t Dripping Pan, and makes the Turkey rife b ter; when it is dnough' froth it up as befo dilh it up, pour on your Difh the fame Gra as for the boiled Turkey, only put in ^xovk ing inftead of Cream: Gamifh with Lem and Pickles, and ferve it up j if it be of a Mi die Size it will require one Hour and a qu; ter roafting.

sz . The ExPEkifi^tED

» "^ \

To nudie Smce fir a Tofkey. ¦

» ' ¦, ' '' * ' • • ¦ » . ¦^ r ¦ " ¦ .

CuT^ the Ghifid off a IRennyiLiDaf^ out duet reft in thin Slices, put it in ooid Water; widtva few Pepper Corns, a^litde Salt adilOnicm^ bosi it 'till the Brdadisiquhe ibft, then: beat it ^ivel}^ pm in; a quarter io£ a Pound of Biitter; jtwD. Spcx2ni£iila cf thick Cream^ itnd piiK' it! int^v a Bafon^ . . •

Sf ttijr you haireifluckfid your Fowls^ diMw th^nL'St uve Rtmii,* cot odS^ thfe Head^i .Keck and' ii^gB, take the- Breitft->bonq very eardfally Gfuty fkewer thetrtx^tith the End of thek Le^ ih thfi' Body^' tie" tiiem . ro^nd urith a String, fin^,/:a^id dufl them well with Flour^ pnt them ia a Kettle df cold ^ater^ C6xrer it dafe, fee it (Ki: the i'lt^y. when the Scum* begins ix> nfe^ take it ofiT^ put oh ycmrCo^er^ and let them boil vei*y! fteWly twenty Minuoes^ takfe. them off, cover them clofe; arid the Heat of the Wacer will flew them enough in half an HouT> it keeps the Skin whole^ and they wUt be both whiter and plumper than if they? had. boiled fail; when^ you take them up^ drdin. them, poor over them White Sauce^ or melted

Butcer,

»

To mah Wliice %Avcjefor Fowls.

Take a Scrag of Veal, the Necks of the fbwls, or any Bits of Mutton or Veal you

have,

English HO USE-^ KEEPER. 5^

have, put them in a Sauce Pan, with a Blade or two of Mace^ a few Black Pepper Corns, one Anchovy, a Head of Cellery, a Bunch of Svreer Herha, ^ SKtie -of the Es^ df aiLeman, tmt in a Qusat c£ Water, cover it clofe#. let ijt OoiL 'till it IS reduce to half a Pint, fbraia it, and jtfaidkeii it wita a quarter of a Pounded Butter, tnixed with, flour, boii^ it five or. fix lIlHiuiscfiif put ih/ two Spoonfuls of pickled Mttflirociixa,^ mix the Yolks of two Eggs with a Tea Cup full of gocid Cream, and a littk Nnttneg, put it in your Sauce, keep Ihaking it over the Fire, but xlon't let it hoii. - .

To roaft large Fowls.

Ta«B' your Fowls^ when they are ready dreflfed, imt them down to a good Pire, finge; daft, and bafte them well with Buj:ter, they v^i l be near an Hour in roaft ing, make a Gravy of the Necks and Gizards, flrain it, put in a Spoonful of Browning; when you difh them up, pour the Gravy into the Difh, ferve them np^ wiih Egg Sauce, in a Boat.

lo tnah Egg S&uct,

Btxih two V^ggJi hard, half chop the Whites, tinn put in the Yolks, chop them both toge- ther, but not very 'fine, put 'them into a qoM" ter of a Pound of good nieltad Butter, and put it in a Boat.

• To

54. ' Tiie Experienced

1" ¦ . .., . .

3"(? ioil young Cliickcns. ^

.?ux your* Ghickehs in fcaldin^; Watciv as fbon' as> the Feathers will ilip on, take tkem out, or it will make the Skin hard and break, when you have, drawn them, lay ihe^ in ^ fldmed iMilkr fhr two Hours, then tru&.them. with, their, H^ads on their Wings, fii^ge, and dujft'them well with Flour, put them in cold Water,; cover jkaQm 6lofe, fet them over a very ilb^M Fire,, take off the Scum, let them boil flowly for five or .fix Minutes, take them off the Fire, keep them clofe covered in the Water for half an JHCojur, it will ftcw Aem. enough, and make them both white and plump; when you are going to di£h them, fet them over the yire to make them hot, drain them; pour over them White Sauce made the fame Way as for the boiled Fowls.

r.

To roafi young Chickens.

When you kill young Chickens, pluck them very carefully, draw tnem, only cut off the Claws, trufsthem and put them down to a good Fire, finge, duft, and baile them with Butter; they.wiU take a quarter of an Hour roafting, then Froth them up, lay them on your Di£h, pour Butter and Pariley in the Pifh, and ferve them up hot.

To

ENGLtSH HOUSE- KEEPER. ' 55

f • ... . .

To roaft Pheafafats or Paraidgcs.

Whek you roaft Pheafants or Partridges, keep them at a good Diftance from the Fire, duff .them, andbafte them often with frefh Butter J if your Rre is good, half ^n Hour will roaft. them, put a little Gravy in the Diih, made of. a Scrag of Mutton, a Spoonful of Catdiup, the fame of Browning, and a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, ftrain, it, difti them up, with Bread Sauce, in a Bafon, made the fame Way as for the boiled Turkey.

N. B. When a Pheafant is roafted, flick Fea- thers on the Tail before you fend it to the Table.

• • ¦

To roaft RufFs and Rccs.

These Birds I never met with but in Lin- colnlGbire, the beft Way to feed them is with White Bread boiled in Milk, they muft have feparate Pots, for two will not eat out of one, they will be fat in eight or ten Days j when you kill them, flip the Skin off the Head and Neck with the Feathers on, then pluck and draw them; when you roaft them, put them a good Diftance from the Fire, if the Fire be good, they will take about twelve Minutes, when they are roafted, flip the Skin on again with the Feathers on, fend Oiem up with Gravy under them, made the fame as for the

Pheafant,

t

Pheafant, and Bread Sauce, in a Boat, or crifp Crumps of ^&re$4 ^Qxa^i cl « R3ge. pf ^^ Dilh.

To nuft Wbodcocki or &iip^.

Pluck theni^ but doa'c draw theil], pac them on a fmall Spit, duft, and bafle them well with Butter^ toaft a few Slices of a Penny Loaf, put them on a clean Plate, and iet it tinder the Birds while thev are ixrafting, if the Fire be good, they will taxe about ten Minutes ibaiHng, -when you draw them lay them upon the Toails . on the Diih^ pour melted Butter .

round them, and ferve them up. (

¦ ' ¦. * •

To fxxj/? Wild Duclu or TeaL \

I-

' ' v.

1

When your Ducks are ready drefled, put in ^ them a fmall Qnion^ Pepper, Salt, and a Spoon- ful of Red Wine, if the Fire be good, they will roaft in twemy Minutes, make Gravy of the Neckfi and Gizzards, a Spoonful of Red; Wine, half an Anchovy, a Blade or two of; Mace, a Slice of an End of a Lemon, one O* ni
To hwi Pidgeons.

¦ . .

ScAJLD your Pidgeons, draw them, take the Craw clean out, wafh them in feveral Waters,

cut

English HOUSE-REEPER. si

cut off the Pinions, turn the Legs undef the! Wings, dredge them, and put them in foft cold Water, boil tnem>ery flowly a quarter of an Hour, difh them up, pour over them good melted Butter, lay round them a little Brocoli; in Bunches, fend Butter and Parflley in a Boat^

r

To rdaft Pidgedlii.

When you have drefled youi* KdgeChiiS asi before, roll a good Lump of Batter in chopped Parfley, with Pepper and Salt, put it in youi" Kdgeons, fpit, duft, and bafte them, if the Fire be good, they will be roafted in twenty Minutes, when they are enough lay round them Bunches of Afparagus, with Parfley and Butter for Sauce^

To roafi Larks.

Put a Dozen of Larks on a SkeWef, tie it xa the Spit at both Ends, dredge and bafte them^ let them roaft ten Minutes, take the Cnimb of a Half-penny Loaf, with a Piece of Butter the Size of a Walnut, put it in a Tolling Pan, and (hake it over a gentle Fire 'till they are a light Brown, lay ihem betwixt your Birds, and pour over them a little melted Butter-

«

To boll Rabbles.

When Voti have cafed your Rabbits, ^c^f^ them with their Heads ftraight up, the Fore- Legs brought down, ana the Hind-lega

H ftraighty

58 Tlie Experienced

ftraight, boil them three quarters of an Hour at leaft, then fmother them with Onion Sauce, made die fame as for boiled Ducks, piill out the Jaw-bopes, flick them in their Eye's, put a Sprig of Myrtle or Barberries in their Mouths, and ferve them up.



To roafi Rabbits.

When you have cafed your Rabbits, flcewef their Heads with their Mouths upon their Backs, flick their Fore-legs into their Ribs, fkewer the Hind-legs double, then make a Pudding for them', of the Crumb of half a Penny Xoaf, a little Parfley, Sweet Marjoram, Thyme, and Lemon Peel, all fhread fine, Nut- meg, Pepper and Salt to your Tafte, mix them up into, a light Stuifing, with a quarter of a Pound of Butter, a little good Cream, and two Eggs, put it into the Belly, and few them up, dredge, and bafte them well with Butter, roaft them near an Hour, ferve them up with Parfley and Butter for Sauce, chop the Livers and lay tliem in Lumps round the Edge of your Difti^

to roaft a Hare.

' . . .

Skewer your Hare with the Head upon one Shoulder, the Fore-legs fticked into the Rib?, the Hind-legs double, make your Pudding of the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, a quarter of a Pound of Beef Marrow or Suet, and a quarter of a Pound of Butter, fliread the Liver, a Sprig or two of Winter Savory, a little Lemon Peel,

one

"I

1

J

English HOUSE-KEEPfeR. 59

one Anchovy, a little Chyan Pepper, half a Nutmeg gratered, mix them up in a light Forcemeat, with a Glafs of Red Wine, and two Eggs, put it in the Belly of your Hare, few it up, put a Quart of good Milk in your Drip- ping Pan, bafte yovr Hare with it 'till it is re- duced to half a Gill, then duft, and bafte it well with Butter j if it be a large one, it will require an Hour and a half roafting.

*

To boil a Tongue.

If your Tongue be a dry one, fteep it in Water all Night, then boil it three Hours, if you would have it eat hot, ftick it with Cloves, nib it over with the Yolk of an Egg, ftrew over it Bread Crumbs, bafte it with Butter, fet it before the Fire 'till it is a light Brown; when you difti It up, pour a little Brown Gravy, or Red Wine Sauce, mixed the fame Way as for Venifon, lay Slices of Currant Jelly round it.

N. B. If it be a pickled one, only wafli it out qf Water.

To boil a Ham.

Steep your Ham all Night in Water, then boil it; if it be of a middle Size, it will take three Hours boiling, and a fmall one two Hours and a half; when you take it up, pull c^ the Skin, and rub it all over with an Egg, ftrew on Bread Oumbs, bafte it with Butter, fet it to the Fire /till it be a light Brown j if it

H 2 be

^o - The Experienced

be to eat hot, gamifli with Carrots, and fervc it up.

To roaft a Haunch of Venifon.

When you have fpitted your Venifon, lay over it a large Sheet of Paper, then ^ thiii common Paile with another Paper over it^ tic it well to keep the Fafte from railing, if it be a large one it will take four Hours roading; when it is enough take oflf the Paper and Paite, duft it well with Flour, and bafte it with But- ter; when it is a light Brown difli it up with Brown Gravy in your Pifh, or Currant JcUy Sauce, and fend fome in a Boat.

*

Xo hroil Beef Stake?/

Cut your Stakes ofF a Rump of Beef about half an Inch thick, let your Fire be clear, rub your Gridiron well with Beef Suit, when it is hot, lay them on, let them broil until they be-;in to Brown, turn them, and when the other lide is Brown, lay them on a hot Difli, with a Slice of Butter betwixt every Stake, fprinkle a little Pepper and Salt pver them, let them ftand two or three Minutes, then Slice a Shalot (as hin as poflible) into a Spponful of Water, Lay on your Stakes again, keep turning them *tiU they are enough, put them on your Difli, pour the Shalot and Water amongft them, and fend them to the Table,

A

English HOTJSE-KEEPER, 6^

A v^ry good Wciy to fry Beef Stakes.

Cut yoTirStakes as fcMT broiling, put them into a Stew Pan with a good Lump of Butter, fct them over a verf flow Fire^ keep turning theni 'tiU the Butter is become a thick white Gravy, pour it into a Bafon, and put more Butter to them; when they arc almoft enough, pour all the Gravy into your Bafon, and put more But- ter imo your Pan* fry them a light Brown over a quick Fire, take them out or the Pan, put them in a hoc Pewter Difh, Slice a Shalot among them, put a little in your Gravy that was drawn from thejn, and pour it hot upon ^hem: I think this is the beft Way ef dremng Beef Stakes. Half a Pound of Butter will drefs a large Difh,

To drep Beef Stakej a conamn Way^

Fry your Stakes in Butter a good Brown, then put in half a Pint of Water, an Onion Iliced, a Spoonful of Walnut Catchup, a little Caper Liquor, Pepper, and Salt, cover them clofe with a Difli, and let them flew gently j when they are enough, thicken the Gravy with Flour and Butter, and ferve them up.

To broil Mutton Stakes.

Cut your Stakes half an Inch *hick^ when your Gridiron is hot, rub it with frefli Suit, lay DQ ypur Intakes, keep turning tUein as quick as

poffible,

62 *rhe Experienced

pollible, if you don't take great Care the Fat that drops from the Stakes will fmoak them; when they are enough, put them into a hot Difli, rub them well with Butter, Slice a Sha- lot' very thin into a Spoonful of Water, pour it on them with a Spoonful of Mufhroom Catchup and Salt, ferve them up hot.

To broil Pork. Stakes,

Observe the fame as from the Mutton Stakes^ only Pork requires more broiling; when they are enough, put in a little good Gravy, a little Sage rubbed very fine^ ftrew it over theqa, it gives them a fine Tafte.

To hajb Beef.

Cut your Beef in very thin Slices, take a lit- tle of your Gravy that run from it, put it in-* to a Toffing Pan with a Tea Spoonful of Le- mon Pickle, a large one of Walnut Catchup, the fame of Browning, flice a Shalpt in, ana put it over the Fire; when it boiU put in your Beef, fhake it over the Fire 'till it be quite hot, the Gravy is not to be thickened, llice in a fmall pickled Cucumber: Garpilh with fcraped Horfe-radifli or pickled Onions,

To hajh Venifon.

Cut your Venifon in thin Slices, put a large Glafs of Red Wine into a Toffing Pan, a Spoon- ful of Muflirom Catchup, the fame of Brown- ings

English . HOUSE-KEEPER. 63

ing^ an Onion ftuck with Cloves, and half an Anchovy chopped fmall; when it boils, put in your Venifon, let it boil three or four Minutes, pour it into a Soup Difhj and lay round it Cur- rant Jelly or Red Cabbage.

To hajh Mutton.

Cut your Mutton in Slices, put a Pint of Gravy or Broth into a Toiling Pan, with one Spoonful of Mufhroom Catchup, and one of Browning, flice in an Onion, a little Pepper and Sah, put it over the Fire, and thicken it with Flour and Butter; wlxen it boils put in your Mutton, keep (baking it 'till it is tho- roughly hot, put It in a Soup Difh and ferve it up.

To hajh VeaL

Cut your Veal in thin round Slices, the Size of a Half Crown, put them into a Sauce Pan, with a little Gravy and Lemon Peel cut exceed- ing fine, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, put it over the Fire, and thicken it with Flour and Butter J when it boils put in your Veal, juft before you difh it up put in a Spoonful of Cream, lay Sippets round your Difli and ferve it Up.

To luarm up Scotch CoUops.

"When you have any Scotch Collops left, put them into a Stone Jar 'till you want them,

then

64 'I'^e Exp£RfE«CJfe6.

then pttt the lar into a Pan of boiling; Water, let it ttaiid 'till yottr CoUops are quite hot, then pour them into a IHfh, lay over thetn a few broiled bits of Bacdn, and they will eat as well as freih 6nes«

To mince Veal.

Cut ycHir Veal m Slices, then ctit it in little £]uate Bits, don't chop it, put it into a Sauce Vzn with two or three Spoonfuls of Cravy, a Slice of Lemon, a little Pepper and Salt, st good Lump of Butter rolled m flour, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, and a large Spoon- ful of Cream; keep fliaking it over the Fire *till it boils, but don't let it boil abote a Mi-* nute, if you do it will niake your Veal eat hard: Put Sippets round your Difli and ferv« it up^

To hajh a Turkey.

Tak« off the Legs, cut the Thighs in two Pieces, cut off the Pinions and Breaft in pretty large Pieces, take off the Skin or it will give the Gravy a greafy Tafte, put it into a Stew Pan, with a Pint of Gravy, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a Slice off the End of a Lemon, and a little beaten Mace j boil your Turkey fix or feven Minutes, (if yoi; boil it any longer it will make it hard) then put it on your Dilh, thicken your Gravy with Flour and Butter, mix the Yolks of two Eggs With a Spoonful of (hick Gream, put it in your Gravy, flbake it

over

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 6s

Over your Fire *till it is quite hot, but don't let it hoRi ftrain it, and pour it over your Turkey: Lay Sippets round, ferve it up, and garnifli with Lemon oj; Parlley.

To haflj Fowls.

Cut up your t^owl as for eating, put it in a Tolling Pan, with half a Pint of Gravy, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle^, a little Mufhroom Catchup, a Slice of Lemon, thicken it with Flour and Butter } juft before you difh it up put in a Spoonful of good Cream: Lay Sippets round your Difh and ferve it up.

To hajh a Woodcock, or Partridge.

Gut your Woodcock up as for eating, work the Entrails very, fine with the Back of a Spoon, mix it with a Spoonful of Red Wine, the fame of Water, half a Spoonful of Alle^ar, cut an Onion in Slices, and pull^ it into Rmgs, roll a little Butter in Flour, put* them all in your Tofling Pan, and fhake it over the Fire 'till it boils, then put in your Woodcock, and when it is thoroughly hot, lay it in your Dilh with Sippets round it, ftrain the Sauce over the Woodcock, and lay on the Onion in Rings; it is a pretty Comer Diih for Dinner or Supper.

To haJh a Wild Duck.

Cut up your Duck as for eating, put it in a TojQing Pan, with a Spoonful of good Gravy,

I the

s . I

66 the Experience^

the fame 6f Red Wine, a little of yOtlJr Oniod Sauce, or aii Onion fliced exceeding^ thin; Vfeett it has boiled two or thtee Minutes, lay the Duck in your Dilh, pour the CJIavy over it, k mull not be thickened, ^you may add a Tea I Spoonful of Caper Liquor, or a little Browning. J

To hafh a Hare.

Cut your Hare in fmafl Pieces, if you \i2Nt itny of the Podding left, rub it fmall, put to it a large Glafs of Red. Wine, the fame Quantity of Water, half an Anchovy chopped fmall, an Onion ftuck with four Cloves, a Quarter of i Pound of Butter rolled in Flour, make tliem altogether over a flow Fire, 'till your Hare is thoroughly hot, it is a bad Cuftom to let any Kind o? Hafli boil longer, (it inakes the Meat to eat hard) fend your Hare to the Table in a deep Difli, lay Sippets roimd it, but take out the Onion and ferve it up. • J

t

To hoil Cabbage.

Cut off the Outfide Leaves, and cut it in Quar- ters, pick it Well, and wafh it clean, boil it ift a large Quantity <>f Water, with Plenty of Salt in it; when it is tender and a fine light Green, lay it on a Sieve to drain, but don't fqueeze ^"0^ if you do, it will take off the Flavour; have ready fome very rich melted Butter, or chop it with cold Butter. - Greens lAuft be boiled the fame Way,

To



t

Engmsw HOUSS-K^EPEJR. 67

To hail a CoUy-flowcr.

Wash and clean your Cojly-flower, boil it

in Plenty of Milk and Water, (but no Salt) 'till

* it Ij^ t^der I whe5\ yo\i dilli it up, lay Greens

.Ufk^er it, peur oyer )t good melte4 Better, and

^^ W up hot.

T0 hail BiocoU in Jtsitatioa of Afparagus.

T^i^jt tfeff Side Shoots of BrocoU, ftrip off ihp leaves, and with a Penl^nifp, take off all thp Out-rind up to the Heads, tie them in Bupc^e^, and put them in Salto and Water, have ready a Pan of boiling W*ter, with aHi^idful of Salt in it, boil them ten Minutes, then lay them in ^UHchfiS,and pour ovey tlj^in gOQd melte^Butter.

To Jiffw Spinage.

W48fi yoiir Splp^ge well in fever^I Waters, put i^ in a CuIIander, have ready ji J^rge Pan

of boiling Water with 3. Handful of 3alt, put it in, let it boil two Minutes, it will take off the ftrong earthly Tfiftie, then put it into a Sieve, fqueeze it well, put a quarter of a Pound of Butter into aToffing Pan, put in your Spin- age, keep turning and cjiqppmg it with a J^nife, untiJ if be quite dry and green, lay jt upon a Plate, prefs it with aik>ther, cut in the Sh^pe of Sippets
I * 4 i3aild.

68 The EXPERHENGED

mild, and quite a different Tafte frona the common Way.

To ^0/7 Artichokes.

*

If they are young ones, leave about an Inch of the Stalk, put them in a Arong Salt and Water for an Hour or two, then put them in a Pan of cold Water, fet them over the Fire, but

? don't cover them, it will jake oS their Colour;

^ when you difli them up, put rich melted

Butter in fmall Cups or Pots, like Rabbits, put

I ihem in the Difli with your Artichokes, and

fead them up.

• ¦ ¦

To boil Afparagus.

Scrape your Afparagus, tie them in ftnall Bunches j^ boil them in a large Pan of Water with Salt in it; before you dim. them up, toaft fome Slices of White Bread, and. dip tnem in the boiling Water, lay the Afparagus oi^ your Toafts, pour on them very rich melted Butter, I and ferve them up hot.

To boil French Beans.

Gut the Ends of your Beans off, then cut theni Slant-way§, put them in a ftrong Salt and Water, as you do them, let them ftand an Hour, boil them in a large Quantity of Water with a Handful of Salt in it, they will be a ^ne Green; wlien you difli them up, pour on f hem melted Bitter, and fend them up.

7#

• 1

English HOUSE-KEEPE R. 69

To boil Windfor Beans.

Boil them in a good Quantity of Salt and Water, boil and chop fome Parfley, put it in good melted Butter; ferve them up withBacoo in the Middle if you chufe it,

To boil Green Peas.

Shell your Peas juft before you want them, put them into boiling Water, with a little Salt and a Lump of Loaf Sugar, when they begin to dent in tne Middle, they are enough, flrain them in a Sieve, put a good Lump of Butter into a Mug, give your Peas a Ihake, put them on a Difli, and fend them to the Table. - ^Boil a Sprig of Mint in another Water, chop it fine, and lay it in Lumps round the Edge of your Dilh.

To hoil Parfnips.

Wash your Parfnips very well, boil them 'till they are foft, then take oiF the Skin, beat them in a Bowl with a little Salt, put to them a little Cteam and a Lump of Butter, put them in a Toiling Pan, let them boil 'till they are like a light Cuftard Pudding, put them on a l^late, and fend them to the Table.

CHAP.

70 The ExPKRiENCEQ

C H A P. IV. Ohfervatians on Made Diihc#.

BE careful the Tofling P»a is weU tinoi^ quite clean, and not gritty^ ^nd put ^very Ingredient into your White Sauce, and have it of a proper thicknefs, and well boiled, be- fore you put in Eggs and Cream, for they will not suid much to the thicknefs, nor ftir th^m with a Spoon after they are in, nor fet yp^ji: jPan on the Fire for it will gather at the bot- tom and be in liUmps, but hold your Pan 9 good Height from the Fire, and keep ih^king the Pan round one Way, it will keep the S^uc^ ixom curdling, and be fi;ire yp\i don't l^t it boil; it is the beft Way to take up your Me^it, Collops, or Hafli, or any other Kincl pf Difl^ you are making, with a Fifh Slice, and flraii) your Sauce upon it, for it is almoft impoilible to prevent little Bits of Meat from mixing with the Sauce, and by this Method the Sauce will Xook clear.

In the Brown Made Diihe^ t)k^ fpecial C^jt^ no Fat is on the Top of the Gravy, Wt (kinft it ckan off, and diat it be of a dn^ Prowp, ^nd taflje of no one Thing particular j if yon. ufe any Wine put it in fouifi Time before yo\ir Difli is ready, to take off the rawnefs, for no- thing can give a Made Difti a more difagree- able Tafte than raw Wine, or frefh Anchovy: When you ufe fried Forcemeat Balls, put them

on

English HOUSE^KEEPER. 71

on a Sieve to dtzin the Fat from them, and n6vfer let thetn bod in your Sauce, it will give it a greafy look, suid fc^ten the Balls -, the bed Way is to put them in after your Meat is diined up.

Fou inay ufe pickled Muflttooms, Artichoke Sottoms, Morels, Truffles, and Forcemeat Bisills in almoft evety Made Difli, and in feve- ral, you may ufe a Roll of Forcemeat inftead of Balls, as in the Porcupine Breaft of Veal, atid were you can ufe it, it is much handfomer than Balls, efpecially in a Mock Turtle, col- lai«d or raggooed Breail of Veal, or any large

Made Difh.

«

To drefs a Mock Turtle.

Take the largeft Calf's Head you can get, "vri^ the Skin on, put it in fcalding Water, Yill you find the Hair will come oflF, clean it yell, and wafli it in warm Water, and boil it three quarters of an Hour, then take it out of the Water and flit it down the Face, cut off all t!he Meat along with the Skin as clean from the ^%ont as you can, and l)e careful you don't break the Ears ciBF, lay it on a flat Difli, and •ftuff the Ears with Forcemeat, and tie them tound with CJoths, take the Eyes out, and pick all the reft of the Meat clean from the Bones, put it in a Tofling Pan, with the nicefl: and fatteft Part of another Calf's Head, without the Skin on, boiled as long as the above, ^nd three Quarts of Veal Gravy, lay the Skin

in

^^ The Exi^ERiENcEii

in the Pan on the Meat with the Flcfti Side up, cover the Pan clofe, and let it ftew over a mo- derate Fire one Hour, then put in three Sweet- breiads fried a light Brown, one Ounce o^ Mo* rels, the fame of Truffles, five Artichoke Bot* toms boiled, one Anchovy boned and chopped fmall, a Tea Spoonful of Chyan Pepper, a lit- tle Salt, half a Lemon, three Pints of Madeira Wine, two Meat Spoonfuls of Mufhroom Catchup, one of Lemon Pickle, half a Pint of Muflirooms, and let them ftew flowly half an Hour longer, and thicken it with Flour and Butter; have ready the Yolks of four Eggs boiled hard, and the Brains of both Heads boiled, cut the Brains the Size of Nutmegs, and make a rich Forcemeat, and fpread it on the Caul of a Leg of Veal, roll it up and boil it in a Cloth one Hour; when boiled, cut it in three Parts, the Middle largeft, then take up the Meat into theDifh,and lay the Head over it with the Skin Side up, and put the largeft Piece of Forcemeat between the Ears, and make the Top of the Ears to meet round it; (this is called the Crown of the Turtle,) the other Slices of the Forcemeat lay oppofite to each other at the narrow End, and lay a few of the Truffles^ Morels, Brains, Mufhrooms, Eggs, and Arti- choke Bottoms upon the Face and round it, ftrain the Gravy boiling hot upon it, be as quick in difhing it up as polfible fgr it foon goes cold.

Mock

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 73

Mock Turtle a fecond Way.

Dress the Hair of a Calf's Head as before, boil it half an Hour, when boiled cut it in Pieces half an Inch thick, and one Inch and a half long, put it into a Stew Pan with two Quans of Veal Gravy, and Salt to your Tafte; let it ftew one Hour, then put in a Pint of Madeira Wine, half a Tea Spoonful of Chyan Pepper, Truffles and Morels one Ounce each, three or four Artichoke Bottoms boiled and cut in Quarters; when the Meat begins to look clear and the Gravy flrong, put in half a Le- mon, and thicken it with Flour and Butter, fry a few Forcemeat Balls, beat four Yolks of hard boiled Eggs in a Mortar very fine, with a Lump of Butter, and make them into Balls the Size of Pigeons Eggs \ put the Force-meat Balls and Eggs in after you have dilhed it up.

N. B. A Lump of Butter put in the Water makes the Articnoke Bottoms boil White and fooner.

To make a Calf's Head hajh.

Clean your Calf's Head exceeding well, and boil it a quarter of an Hour j when it is cold cut the Meat in thin broad Slices, and put it into a Toiling Pan, with two Quarts of Gravy; and when it has ftewed three Quarters of an Hour,add to it oneAnchovy,a little beatenMace, and Chyan to your Tafte, t\Vo Tea Spoonfuls

. K of

74 ^he Experienced

of Lemon Pickle, two Meat Spoonfuls of Wal- nut Catchup, half an Ounce of Truffles and Morels, a Slice or two of Lemon, a Bundle of Sweet Herbs, and a Glafs of White Wine, mix a quarter of a Pound of Butter with Flour, . and put it in a few Minutes before the Head j: is enough, take vour Brains and put them into hot Water, it will make them Ikin fooner, and beat them fine in a Bafon, then add to them two Eggs, one Spoonful of Flour, a bit of Le- mon Peel fliread fine, chop fmall a little Par-' iley. Thyme, and Sage, beat them very well together, ftrew in a little Pepper and Salt, then drop them in little Cakes into a Panful of boil- ing Hog's-lard, and fry them a light Brown, then lay them on a Sieve to drain; take -your Hafh out of the Pan with a Fifh Slice, and lay it on your Difh, and ftrain your Gravy over it, lay upon it a few Muflirooms, Force- meat Balls, the Yolks of four Eggs boiled hard, and the Brain Cakes: Garnifli with Le^ mon and Pickles.

It is proper for a Top or Side Diih.

To drefs a Calf's Head Suprizc.

Dress off the Hair of a large Calf's Head as direded in the Mock Turtle, then take a fharp-pointed Knife and raife oiF the Skin, with as much of the Meat from the Bones as you poflibly can get, that it may appear like a whole Head when it is ftuflfed, and be care* f ul you don't cut the Skin in holes, then fcrape a Pound of fat Bacon> the Crumb of two Pen- ny

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 7;

nf Loaves, grater a fmall Nutmeg, vrith Salt Chyan Pepper, and fliread Lemon Peel to your Tafte, the Yolks of fix Eggs well beat, mxf. all lip into a rich Force-meat, put a lit- tie into the Ears, and ftuff the Head with the Remainder, have ready a deep narrow Pot that it will juft go in, with two Qijarts of Water. half a Pint of White Wine, two Spoonfuls or Lemon Pickle, the fame of Walnut and Mufli- room Catchups, one Anchovy, a Blade or two of Mace, a Bundle of Sweet Herbs, a little Salt and Chyan Pepper, lay a coarfe Pafte over it to keep in the Steam, and fet it in a very quick Oven two Hours and a half j when you take it out lay your Head in a Soup Difli, Ikim the Fat clean off the Gravy, and ftrain it through a Hair Sieve into a Tofling Pan, thicken it with a Lump of Butter roU'd in Flour; when it has boiVd a few Minutes, put in the Yolks of fix Eggs well beat, and mixed with half a Pint of Cream, but don't let it boil, (it will curdle the Eggs;) you muft have ready boiled a fewForce- meat Balls, half an Ounce of Truffles and Mo- rels, it would make the Gravy too dark a Go- lour to ftew them in it: Pour your Gravy over your Head, and garnifti with the Truffles, Mo- rels, Force-meat Balls, Mushrooms, and Bar- berries, and ferve it up. This is a handfomeTopDiih at a fmall Expence.

jj To grill a Calf s Head.

Wash yourCalf 's Head cle^n, and boil italmoR tttough^ then take it up and hafli one half, the

K 2 other

The Experienced

»

r half rub over with the Yolk of an Egg, :le Pepper and Salt, ftrew over it Bread nbs, Parfley chopped fmall, and a little ed Lemon Peel, fet it before the Fire and > bafting it all the Time to make the Froth when it is a fine light Brown, difh up • Hafh, and lay the grilled Side upon it*

anch your Tongue, flit it down the Middle, lay it on a Soup iplate } ikin the Brains, them with a little Sage and Piiffley, chop 1 fine, and mix them with fonfie melted er, and a Spoonful of Cream, make them and pour them over the Tcmgue, ferve a up, and they are Sauce for the Head.

make a Porcupine of a Brcaft of Veal.

3KE the fineft and largeft Breafl: of Veal can getj^rub it over with the Yolks of two s, fpread it on a Table, lay over it a little )n cut as thin as poflible, a Handful of ley fhread fine, the Yolks of five hard boil- Lggs chopped fmall, a little Lemon Peel fine, Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt to your e, and the Crumb of a Penny Loaf fteeped Ire am, roll the Breaft clofe, and fkewer it then cut fat Bacon and the lean of Ham has been a little boiled, or it will turn the 1 red, and pickled Cucumbers about two les long to anfwer the other Lardings, and it in rows, firft flam, then Bacon, tnin umbers, till they have larded it all over Veal J put it in a deep Earthen Pot, with a

Piot

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 77

Pint of Water, and cover ic, and fet it in a £taw Oven two Hours; when it comes from the Oven fkim the Fat off, and ftrain the Gravy through 3a Sieve into a Stew Pari, put in a Glafs of White Wine, a little Lemon Pickle and Caper Liquor, a Spoonful of Mulhroom Catch- up, thicken it with a little Butter rolled in Flour, lay your Porcupine on the Dilh, and pour it hot upon it, cut a Roll of Forcemeat m four Slices, lay one at each End and the other on the Sides; have ready your Sweet- breads cut in Slices and fried, lay them round it with a few Mufhrooms. It is a grand Bottom Difh when Game is not

to be had,

N. B. Make the Forcemeat of a few chopped Oyflers, the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, half a Pound of Beef Suet fhread fine, and the Yolks of four Eggs, mix them well together with Nutmeg, Chyan Pepper, and Salt to your Pa- late, fpread it on a Veal Caul, and roll it up clofe like; a collared Eel, bind ic in a Cioth^ and boil it one Hour.

To raggooe a Breaft of Veal.

Half roaft a Breaft of Veal, then Bone it, and put it in a Toffing Pan, with a Quart of Veal Gravy, one Ounce of Morels, the fame of Truffles, ftew it 'till tender, and juft before yon thicken the Gravy, put in a few Oyfters, pickled Mufhrooms, and pickled Cucumbers, cut in fmall fquare Pieces, the Yolks of four

Eggs

78 The ExpERiENcsu

Eggs boiled hard, cut your Sweet-»*brcad in Slices, and fry it a light Brown, difti up your Veal, and pour the Gravy hot over it, lay your Sweet-bread round. Morels, TruflBies, and Eggs upon it: Garnilh with pickled Barberries; this is proper for either Top or Side for Dinner, or Bottom for Supper*

To collar a Breaft of VeaL

Take the fineft Breaft of Veal, Bone it, and nib it over with the Yolks of two Eggs, and ftrew over it fome Crumbs of Bread, a little gratered Lemon, a little Pepper and Salt, a Handful of chopped Parfley, roll it up tight, and bind it hard with Twine, wrap it in a Cloth, and boil it one Hour and a half, then cake it up to cool, when a little cold take off the Clothj and clip oflf the Twine carefully, leaft you open the Veal, cut it in five Slices, lay them on a Di£b with the Sweet- bread boiled and cut in thin Slices, and laid round them, with ten or twelve Force-meat Balls -, pour over your White Sauce, and gamifh with Barber* ries, or green Pickles,

The White Sauce muft be made thus:- Take a Pint of good Veal Gravy, put to it a Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, halt an Anchovy, a Tea Snoonful of Mufliroom Powder, or a fe^ pickled Muihrooms, give it a gentle boil, then put in half a Pint of Cream, the Yolks of two Eggs beat fine, £hakc it over the Fire

after the Eggs .and Cream is in, but don't let



It

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 79

k boil, it will curdle the Cream; it is proper for a Top Diih at Nighty or a Side Dilh for Dinner.

A hikd Brcaft 0/ Vc&L

SKfiWER your Bread of Veal, that it will lie flat in the Dilh, boil it one Hour, (if a large one an Hour and a quarter;) make a White Sauce as before-mentioned tor the collared One, pour it over, and garniih with Pickles.

A Neck of Veal Cutlets.

Cut a Neck of Veal into Cutlets, fry them a fine Brown, then put them in a Tofling Pan, and ftew them 'till tender in a Quart of good Gravy, then add one Spoonful of Browning, the fame of Catchup, fome fried Force-meat Balls, a few Truffles, Morels, and pickled Mufhrooms, a little Salt, and Chyan Pepper, thicken your Oravy with Flour and Butter, let it boil a few Minutes, lay your Cutlets in the Difli, with the fop of the Ribs in the Middle, pour your Sauce over them, lay your Balls, Morels, Truffles, and Mulhrooms over the Cutlets, and fend it up.

A Neck of Veal a4a-royaL

Cut off the Scrag-end and part of the Chine Bone to make it lie flat m the Difli, then chop a few Muflirooms, Shalots, a little Parfley, and Tliyme, all very fine, with Pep- per

So ' The Experienced

per and Salt, cut middle-fized Lards of Bacon, and roll them in the Herbs, &c. and Lard the lean Part of the Neck, put it in a Stew Pan •with fome lean Bacon or Shank of Ham, and the Chine-bone and Scrag cut in Pieces, with three or four Carrots, Onions, a Head of Cel- lery, and a little beaten Mace, pour in as much Water as will cover it, cover the Pan very clofe, and let it ftew flowly for two or three Hours 'till tender, then ftrain half a Pint of the Liquor out of, the Pan through a fine Sieve, fet it over a Stove, and let it boil, keep ilirring it 'till it is dry at the Bottom, and of a good Brown; be fure you don't let it burn, then add more of the Liquor ftrained free from Fat, and keep ftirring it 'till it becomes a fine thick brown Glaze, then take the Veal out of the Stew Pan, and wipe it clean, and put the larded Side down upon the Glaze, fet it over a gentle Fire five or fix Minutes to take the Glaze, then lay it in the Difh with the glazed Side up, and put into the fame Stew Pan as much Flour as will lie on a Six-pencei llir it about well, and add fome of the Braize Liquor, (if any left) let it boil 'till it is of a proper thicknefs, ftrain it and pour it into the Bottom of the Difli, fqueeze in a little Juice of Lemon, and ferve it up.

Bombarded Veal.

Cut the Bone nicely out of a Fillet, make a Force-meat of the Crumbs of a Peritiy Loaf, half a Pound of fat Bacon fcraped, a little

Lemon

English HOUSE-KEEPER. ^1

LeihoQ Peel, or Lemon Thyme, P^ey, two or three Sprigs of Sweet Marjoram, one An- chovy, chop them all very well, grater a little Nutmeg, Chyan Pepper, and Salt to your Pa- late, mix all up together with Egg and a little Gream, and fill up the Place were the Bone canie out with.the Force-naeat^ then cut the Fil- let aciofs, in Cuis. ahbut one Inch one from- another all round the Fillet, fill one Nick with Force-meat, a fecbnd with boiled Spinage, that ifi boiled atnd well fqueezed, a third with Bread Crumbs, chopped Qyfters^ and Beef Marrow, then Force-meat, and fill them up as above all round the Fijlet, wrap the Gaul clofe round it, and put it in a deep Pot with a Pint of Water, make a coatfe Paft6 to lay over it, to keep the Oven from giving it a fiery Tafte; when it comes out of the Oven, Ikim off the Fat, and put the Gravy in a Stew Pan, with a Spoonful Qf Lemori Pickle, and another of Muftiroom Catchup, two of Browning, half an Ounce of Morels and Truflles, five boiled Artichoke Bot- toms cut in Quarters, thidken the Sauce with Flour, and Butter, give it a, gentle boily and pour it upon the Veal into your Dilh.

To make a Frycando of Veah

, Cut Stifces half an liich thick j and fix Inches l^g> out of tlie thick part of. a Leg of Veal, lard them with fmall Cgrdoops, and dull them with Flour, put them before the Fire to broil a Sne Brown,, then put them into a large ToflQlng Pan with a Quart of good Gravy, and let it

82 The £xi*EXi£Mi:EJS

ftew half ail Hour, then pnt in two "fca Spoonfuls of Lemon Pickle, a Meat Spoopf ui of Walnut Catchup, the £aime of Browning, a Slice of Lemon, a little Anchory, andChyan, a few Morels smd Truffles; when your Fiycanr dos is tender, take them up, and thickea yout Gravy with Flour and Butter, ftrain it, pftaoe your Frycandos in the Difli, pour your Gravy on them: Gamiih with Leinon and Barbenies^ You may lay round thefn Force-meat Balls fried, or Force*mcat rolled in Veal Gaul, and iTolks of Eggs boiled hard.

To make Veal Olives.

Cut the thick pstrt of a Leg of Veal m thift j^ces, flatten them with the broad Side of si Cleaver, rub them over with the Yolk o£ ai^ Egg, lay over every Piece a very thin Slice of Bacon, ftrew over them a few Bread Crumbs, a little Lemon feel, and Parfley chopped fmali^ Pepper, and Salt, itnd Nutmeg, roll them up clofe and ikewer them tight, then rub them with the Yolk of Egg&, and roll them in Bread Crumbs and Parfley chopped fmall, put thent into a Tin Dripping Pan to bake or i&y them? therl take a Pmt erf good Gravy^ add to it a Spooilful of Lemon Pickle, the fame of Wal- nut Catchup, arid one of Browning, a little Anchovy, and Chyati^ Pepper, thicken it witto Flour and Butter, ferv« them up with Force- meat Balls, and ftraln the Gravy hot i]f>o» them: Garnifli with' Picktes, and ftrew over tixem a few pickled Muflirooms.-^You may

dref9

English H0USE«KEEPER. 83

drefs Veal Cudets the faipe way, but not roll them.

To drefs Scotch CoUops wbit^.

Cut them oflP the thick part of a Leg of Veal, the fizc and thicknefis of a Crown Piece, put a Lump of Butter into a To£lng Pan, and let it over a flow Fire, or it will difcolour your Collops, before the Pan is hot lay the Couops in, and keep turning them over 'till you fee the Butter is turned to thick white Gravy; put your Gcdlopa and Gravy into a Pot, and fee them upon the Hearth to keep warm, put cold Butter again into your Pan every Time you fill it, and fry them as above, and fo continue 'till you have finifhed; when you have fryed them, pour the Gravy hovn them into your Pan, with a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, Mufhtoom Catchup, Caper Liquor, beaten Mace, Chyan Pepper, and Salt, thicken with Flour and But- ter, when it has boiled five Minutes, put in the Yolks of two Eggs well beat and mixed, with a Tea Cup full of rich Cream;. keep Ihaking your Pan over the Fire 'till your Gravy looks of a fine thicknefs, then put in your CoUops and ihake them, when they are quite hot^ put them on your Difli with Force-meat Balls, ftrew over them pickled Mulhrooms: Garnifh with Barberries, and Kidney-beans.

L 2 Ta

§4 The Experienced

To drefi Scotch Collops brov)n.

Cut your Collops die fame Way as the white ones, but brown your Butter before you lay in your Collops, fry them over a quick Fire, fliakc and turn ihem, and keep them on a fine Eroth; whexjL they are a light brown, put them into a Pot, and fry them as the White ones; when you have fried them all brown, pour all the Gravy from them into a clean Tofling Pan, with half a Pint of Gravy, made of the Bone and Bits you cut the Collops oflF, two Tea Spoon- fuls of Lemon Pickle, a lar^e one of Catchup, the fame of Browning, half an Ounce of Mo- rels, half a Lemon, a little Anchovy, Chyan, and Salf to your Tafte, thicken it with Flour and Butter, let it boil five or fix Minutes, then put in your Collops, and fliake them over the Fire, if they boil it will make them hard; when they have fimmered a little, take them out with an Egg Spoon, and lay thiem on your Difli, ftrain your Gravy and pour it hot on them, lay over them Force-meat Balls, and lit^ tie Slices of Bacon curled round a Skewer and boiled, throw a few Muflirooms over: Gamifli ^ith temon and Barberries, and ferve it up-

«

fa drtfs Scotch Collops French Way.

Tak?; a Leg of Veal, and cut your Collops pT-etty thick, five or fix Inches long and three Inches broad, rub th^m over with the Yolk of a^ Eggi put f epper and Salt, and grate a litde

' ' Nutmeg

English H» USE -KEEPER. 85

Nutmeg on thsm, aid a little fhread Parfley, lay them on ai Ea-then Difh, and fet them before the Fin, baflt them with Butter, and let them be a fine brown, then turn them on the other Side, an( rub them as above, bafte and brown it the fane Aifr'ay; when they are tho^ roughly enougi^ make a good Brown Gravy with Truffles aid Morels, difh up your CoUops^, lay Truffles anoMorels, and the Yolks of hard boiled Eggs ov*- fhem: Garnifli with crifp Parlley and Lem^i^

/

* V

Sweec-lx'eads q-h-daub.

Take three of the largeft and fineft Sweet- breads you can get, put them in a Sauce Pan of boiling Water for five Minifites, then take thena out, and when fiey are cold, lard them with a row down the Middle, with very little Pieces of Bacon, then a row on each Side with Lennon Peel cut the Size of Wheat Straw, then a row on each Side of pickled Cucumbers cut very fine, put them in a Toiling Pan with good Veal Gravy, a little Juice of Lemon, a Spoonful of Browning, Hew them gently a quarter of an Hour? a little before they are ready thicken them 'with Flour and Butter^ dilh them up and pour the Gravy over, lay round them Bunches of boiled Cellery or Oyfter Patties: GairniiOi with ftewed Spinage, green curled Parfley, flick a Bunch* of Barbemes in the Middle of each Sweet-Bread. It is a pretty Corner Difli for either Dinner or

Supper,

Forced

^6 The ExpEKtiwcED

/

Forced Swec^Breids*

Put three Swcet-Brea^'s ia boiling Water five Minutes, be;»t the Yolk of an Egg a little, and rub it over them with a Fiather, ftrew on Bread Crumbs, Lemon Peel, aid Parfley ihread very fine, Nutmeg, Salt, arid Pepper to youF Falate, fet them before the fireto Brown, add to them a little Veal Gravy, putt little Mufhroom Powder, Caper Liquor, or Jiice of Lemon and Browning, thicken it with Flour and Butter, boil it a Tittle and pour it ii your Diih, lay in your Sweet-Breads, and l^jr over them Lemon Peel in rings, cut like Straws: Gamifb wid^ Picl^Jes

To fricafey Sw«t-Breads hrown.

Scald three Sweet-Breads, when cold, cut them in Slices the'thicknefs of a Crown-piece, dip them in Batter, and fry them in frefh But-? ter a nice Brown, make a Gravy for them as jhe laft, ftew your Sweet-Breads flowly in the Gravy eight or ten Minute 9, lay them on your Difli, and pour the Gravy over them: Garnifh with Lemon or Barberries.

To fricafey Sweet-Breads ivhite.

ScALn and flicc the Sweet-Breads as before, put them in a Tolling Pan with a Pint of Veal Gravy, a Spoonful of White Wine, the fame of MufiiroQm Catchup, a little beaten Mace,

ftev

English liOUSfe-KEEPER. 87

fteur them a miarter of an Hoar, thicken your Gratry -with ¥iotr and Batter, a little before &ey are enbugl; when yon are going to difh them up, mix tie Yolk of an Egg -with a Tea Cupful oi thi^ Gream, atid a littlef grated Mutmeg, put ft into your Toffing Pan, and ihake it well oter the Fire, but don't let it boil« lay your Swee:-Breads on your Difh, and pour your Sauce 07^ them: Gamiih with pickled Red Beet-root md Kidney-beans.

To la^^oo SwecC'Bieads.

Ru» tb«m OTCT with the Yolk of an Eggf^ llrew ov€f thfin Bread Crnmbs and Parfley^ thyme and Street Marjoram Ihread fniaU^ and Pepper and Sflt, make a roll of Force-meat like a Sweet-lread, ^^d put k ill a Veal Caul/ and roaft then in a Dutch Ovenj take fome Brown Gravft and put to it a little Lemort Pickle, Mufliwm Catchup, and the End of a Lenxon, boil the Gravy, and when the Sweet-* Breads are e^gby lay them in a Diih, with the Force-m^x m the Middle^ take the End of the L^mcm iut, alnd pdur the Gravy in the hiikky and fere them up;

Tiftew a Fillet of Veal.

tAKt it Tillet of a Cow Calf, ftufF it well tinder the Eider, at the Bone, and quite through to the Shaifc, put it in the Oven with a Pint of Wa;teF under it, 'till it is a fine Brown, then l^ut it in ^ Stew Pto with, three Pints of Gra- vy,

r

68 . The Experienced

?y, flew it tender, put in a few Morels, Tnif-^ Acs, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a large one of Browning, and one of Catchup, . and a Kttle Chyan Pepper, thicken vith a Lump of Butter rolled in Fk>ur, difli up youf Veal, ftram your Gravy over, lay round Fo^ce-meat Balls; GarnrQi with Pickles and Lemosi.

To raggoo a. Fillet of VcaK • - • •

Lard your Fillet and half read it, theli put it in a Toiling Pan, with two Quarts of good Gravy, cover it clofe and let it flew 'till tender,, then add one Spoonful of Whit< Wine, one of Browning, one of Catchup, a Tsa Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a little Gaper Lquor, half an Ounce of Morels, thicken with ?iour and But- ter, lay roimd it a few Yolks of Eggs.

A good Way to drefs a Mdcalf.

Tak£ a Calf's Heart, llufF r with good Force-meat, and fend it to the Oven in .an Earthen Difli with a little Waterunder it, lay Butter over it, and dredge it wih Flour, boil half the Liver and all the Lights ogether half ain Hour, then chop them f^iall, md put them in a Tofling Pan with a Pint 6f Gravy, one Spoonful df Lemon Pickle, and one of Catchup, fqueeze in half a Lemon, Peppef, and Salt, thicken with a good Piece of Buter rtolled in Flour, when you Difli it up, poiir the minced Meat in the Bottom, and have ready fryed a fine brown, the other half of the Li^cr cut in

\ thin

/

I English HOUSE-KEEPER. Sjr

thin Slices, and' little bits of Bacon, fet the Heart in the Middle, and lay the Liver and Bacom over the minced Meat, and ferve it upt

'To difgutf€ a Leg of Veal.

La r» the top jSide of a Leg of Veal in rows

with Bacon, and ftuff it well with Force-meat

^made of Oyfters, then put it into a large Sauce

Pan with as much Water as will cover it, put

on a clofe Lid to keep in the Steam, ftew it

gently 'till quite tender, then take it up, and

boil dovna tne Gravy in the Pan io a Quart,

ikim off the Fat, and add half a Lemon, a

\ Spoonful of Mulhroom Catchup, a little Lemon

\ hckle, the Crumbs of half a Penny Loaf grat-

; ed cxdeeding fine, boil it in your Gravy 'till

k looks thick, then add half a Pint of Oyfters,

if n6t thick enough, roll a Lump of Butter in

Flour* and put it in, with half a Pint of good

Cream, and the Yolks of three Eggs, make

your Sauce ever the Fire, but don't let it boil

after the Eggs arc in left it fhould curdle; put

your Veal in a deep Difli, and pour the Sauce

over it i Garnilh with crifped Parfley and fried

Oyfters.

It is an excellent Difh for the Top of a large

Table-

Harrtco of a Neck of Mutcon#

Cut the beft End of a Neck of Mutton into

Chops, in fingle Ribs, flatten them and fry

them a light Brown, then put them into a largQ

I M Sauce

90 Ttit Experienced

Sauce Pan with two Quarts of Water, i large Carrot cut in Slices^ cut at the Edges like "Wheels; when they haiTc ftewed a quarter d an Hour, put in two Turnips cut in fquare Dices, the white Part of a Head of Cellerjr, a few Heads of Afparagus, two Cabbage Let- ticcs fried, and Chyan to* your Tafhe, boil them all together 'till they are tender, the Gravy 10 not to be thickened; put it into a Tuceen, or Soup Diih.

It is proper far a Top

To drefs a Neck o/' Mutton /o eai like V«niib&

Cut a large Neck, before the Shoulder taken ofi, broader than ufual, and the Flap of the Shoulder with it, to make it look hud* fomer; ftick your Neck all over in little Hofeft J with a iharp Penknife, and pour a Bottte of j Red Wine upon it, and let it lie in the Wioe four or five Days, turn and rub it three or four Times a Day, then take it out and hang ii up £or three Days in the open Air out of the Sun, and dry it often with a Cloth to keep it from niufting; when yon roaft it, baifte it with the Wine it was fleeped in if any left, if not, frelh Wine, put white Paper three or four foulds to keep in the Fat, roaft it thoroughly, ind then take oiF the Skin, and Froth it nicelyj andfervc it up.

n

J

Enough HOUSE-KEEPER. 91

[To fimkt FieiKh Steaks of a Neck of Mutcon.

Let your Mutton be very ^ood and large, and cut off mc^ part of the fat of the Neck, axMi theo cut the Steaks two Inches thick, make [-a large Hole through tht Middle of die fleftiy ^ Murt of every ^xsa^ with a Penknife, and fluff It with Force-meat made of Bre^ Crumbs, Beef Suet, a little Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt, mixed up with the Yolk of an Egg; when they are ftuffed, wssap them in Writing Paper, and put them in a Dutch Oven, fet them before the Fire to broil, tliey will take near an Hour, put a little brown Gravy on yoiu: Difli, and fcrvc them up in the Papers*

A Shoulder of Muttoa farprized.

Half boil a Shoulder, then put it in a Tof- fing^an with two Quarts of good Gfavy, four Ounces of Rice, a Tea Spoonful of Mumroom Powder, a little beaten Mace, and ftew it one Hour^ or 'till the Rice is enough, then take up your Mutton and keep it hot, put to the Rice naif a Pint of good Cream, and a Lump of Butter rolled in Flour, ihake it well and boil it a few Minutes, lay your Mutton on the Difh and pour it over: Garnifh with Barberries or Pickles, and fend it up.

M 2 • To

92 Thje EXPEEIENCED

To 4refs a Shoulder of MuttQDi ^a!kd Hep

and Chickens.

Half roaft a Shoulder, then take it up, and cut off the Blade at the firft Joint, and bodi the Flaps to make Jthe Blade jound, fcore the Blade round in Diamonds, throw a little Pep- per and Salt over it, and fet It in a Tin Oven to broil, cut the Flaps and the Meat oiF the Shank in thin Slices into the Gravy that run out of the Mutton, and put a little goad Gravy to ii^ with two Spoonful of Walnut Catchup, one of Browning, a little Chyan Pepper, andonexir two Shalots, when yourMeat is tender, thicken it with Flour and Butter, put your Meat in the Difh With the Gravy, and lay the Blade on the Top, broiled a dark brown: Garnifli >vith greeii BickkSf and ferve it up,

To hqll (I Shoulder of Mutton, v)ith Onion

Sauce«

Put your Shoulder in wheyi the Water is cold, when enough, fmother it with Onion Sauce, made the lame as for boiled Ducks.- You may drefs a Shoulder of Vejtl the fam$ way.

«

/I Shoulder of Muttoa, and Ccllcry Sauce,

I

Boil it as before 'till it is quite enough, pour over it Cellefy Sauce, and lend it lo the

N.B.

English HO USE -KEEPER. 93

N. B, The Sauce, - ^Walh and clean ten Heads of Gellery, cut off the green Tops, and take off the Outfide Stalks, cut them into thin bits, and boil it in Gravy *till it is tender, thicken it with Flour and Buttd*, and pour it over your Mutton.- A Shoulder of Veal loafted with this Sauce is very good.

Mutton hhobed.

Cut a Loin of Mutton in four Pieces, take off the Skin, and rub them with the Yolk eE an Egg; ftrew over them a few Bread Crumbs and a little (hread Parfley, turn them found and ipit them, roaft them and keep bailmg all the while with frefli Butter, to make the Froth rife j when they are enough, put a little Brown Gravy under, and ferve them upr; Garnifh with Pickle.

To- grill a Brcaft of Mutton.

Sgorc a Breafl of Mutton in Diamonds, and mb it over with the Yolk of an Egg, then ftrew on a few Bitad Crumbs and fhread Parfley, put it in a Dutch Oven to broil, bafte it with frelh Butter, pour in the Dilh good Caper Sauce, and lierve it up.

Split Leg of Mutton and Onion Sauce.

Split the Leg from the Shank to the End, fti(i a Skewer in to keep the Nick open, b^c

it

94 *nie Experienced

it with Red Wine 'till it is half roafted, then take the Wine out of the Dripping Pan, and put to it one Anchovy^ fet it over the Fire 'tlU the Anchovy is diflblved, rub the Yolk of a hard Egg in a little cold Butter, mis: it with the Wine, and put it irf your Sauce Boat, pour good Onion Sauce over the Leg when it ia roafted, and ferve it up*

«

To forte a Leg ^f Mutton.

Razsh the Skin and tdu out the lean I^rt ofip the Mutton, cKop it exceeding fine, widi one Anchovy, fliread a Bundle of Sweet Hcrbfc, grate a Penny Loaf, half a Lemon, Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt to your Tafte, make them into a ForceHtncat, with three Eggs and a largi6 Glafs of Red Wine; fill up the Skin with the Force-meat, but leave the Bone and Shank in their place, and it will appear like a whole Leg, lay it on an Earthen Difh with a Pint of Red Wine under it, and fend it to the Oven; it will take two Hours and a half; when it comes out take off all the Fat, ftrain the Gta- vy over the Mutton, lay round it hard Yoiks of Eg^s, and pickled Muibrooms: Gamiih ^ith Pickles, aiui ferve it up-

To drefs Sheeps Rumps and Kidneys.

w

BojL fix Sheeps Rumps in Veal Gravy, then lard your Kidneys with Bacon, and fet them before the Fire iii a Tin Oven; when the Rumps are teader, rub them over with the

. Yolk

Englwb HOUSE-^KEEPER. 9^

Yolk of an Egg, a little Chyan and grated Nut-- megy^ Ikim tfic ?at off the Gravy, put it in a clean TofSng Pan, with three Ounces of boiled Rice, a Spoonful of eood Cf earn, a little Muih- uoom Powder or Catcbupi diicken it with Fknit aoici Butter, and give it a gentle boil, fry your Rumps a light Brown; when you difh them u^^ lay them roiuid on your Rice, fb that the fmali Ends meet in the Middle, and lay a Kid-** ncy b«wecn every Rump: Gamilh with Red Cabbage or Barbeniedv and ferve k up. It is a pretty Side or Comer Diux<

TV d^^/x a Leg of Mutton tQ eat like Venifin,

Get the largeft and fateft Leg of Muteon you

caA get, cut out like a Hanch of Venifon^ ad

foon as it is killed, whilft it is warm, k will eat

the tenderer, take out the bloody Vein, ftick it

in feveral Places in the under Side with a iharp-*

pointed Knife, pour over it a Bottle of Red Wine^

turo it in the Wine four or five times a Day

for five Days, then dry it CDcceeding well with

a clean Cloth, hang it up in the Air with the

thick Enduppentiodfor five Days, dry it Night

and Morning to keep it from being damp^ oi'

growing mufty; wnen you roaft it, cover it

with Paper and Pafte as you do Venifon; ferve

it up with Venifon SauGe.--^It will take four

Hours roafling.

^

96 The E X p £ 1.1 jfc Kc £ c

A Bafque of Muccon.

Take the Caul of a Leg of Veal, lay it in a Copper Difh the Size, pf a fmall Punch Bowl, take the Lean of a Leg of Mutton that has been kept a Week, chop it exceeding fmall take half its Weight in Beef JMarrow, the Crumbs of a Penny Loaf, the Yolks of four Eggs, two Anchovies, half a Pint of Red Wine, the Rind of half a Lemon grated, mix it like Siaufage-meat, and lay it in your Caul in the Iniide of your Dilh, clofe up the Caul, ^nd bake it in a quick Oven; when it comes out lay your Difh uplide-down, and turn the whole out, pour over it Brown Gravy, and fend it up with Venifon Sauce in a Boat; Gar- niih with Pickle.

Oxford John^

Take a flale Leg of Mutton^ cut it in a» thin CoUops as you poiUbly can, take out all the fat Sinews, feaibn them with Mace, Pep- per, and Salt, flrew among them a little ihrcad Parfley, Thyme, and two or three Shalots, put a good Lump of Butter into a Stew Pan; when it is hot put in a your CoUops, keep Hirring them with a Wooden Spoon 'till the)r are three

fjarts done, then add half a Pint of Gravy, a ittle Juice of Lemon, thicken it a little with Flour and Butter, let them fimmer four or five Minutes and they will be quite enough, if you let them boil, or have them ready before

you

^ «

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 97

you want them they will grow hard; ferve them up hot, with fried Sread cut in Dices, over and round them.

To boil a Leg of Lamb and Loin

Cut your Leg fixnn the Loin, boil the Leg three quarters of an Hour, cut the Loin in handfome Steaks, beat them with a Cleaver, and fry them a good Brown, then (lew them a little in ftrong Gravy, put your Leg on the Difh, and lay your Steaks round it, pour on your Gravy, lay round Lumpfi of ftewed Spin- age, and crifped Parflcy on every Steak, lend it to the Table with Goofberry Sauce in a Boat.

To force a Quarter oj Lamb.

Take a hind Qiiarter, and cut off the Shank, rai^e the thick Part ot the Fle(h from the Bone with a Knife, ftuff the Place with white Force- meat, and fluiF ic under the Kidney, half roail it, then put it in a Toffing Pan with a Quart of Mutton Gravy, cover it clofe up, and let it ftew^ntly; when it 10 enough, tak^ it up, and lay it on your Dilh, ikito the Fat off the Gravy, aad ftrain it, then put in a Glafe of Madeira Wine, one Spoonful of Walnut Catchup, two of 0i»wning, half a Lemon, a little Ghyan, half a Pint of Oyfters, thicken it with a litde Butter rolled in Flour, pour your Gravy hot on your Lamb and ferve it up.

N To

:\

$i8 The E X p E R IK N c e d

» • • • •

To drefs a Lamb s Head and Purtenancc.

Skin the Head and fplit it, take the black . Part out of the Eyes, then walh and clean it exceeding well, lay it in warm Water till it look's white, wafli and clean the Purtenaccc, take oiF the Gall, and lay them in Water, - boil it halt an Hour, then mince your Heart, Liver, and Lights very fmall, put the Mince-meat in a Tofling Pan with a Quart of Mutton Gravy, a little Catchup, Pepper, and Salt, half a Le- mon, thicken it with Flour and Butter, a Spoon- ful of good Cream, and juft boil it up; when your Head is boiled rub it over with the Ydk of an Egg, ftrew over it Bread Crumbs, a little fhread Parfley, Pepper, and Salt, bafte it well I with Butter, and brown it before the Fire, or I with a Salamander, put the Purtenance on-l your Difli, and lay the Head over it: Gamilh I with Lemon or Pickle, and ferve it up.

To frkafiy Lamb Stones*

Skin fix Lamb Stones, or what Quantity you pleafc, dip them in Batter, and fry them in Hog's-lard a nice Brown, have ready a lit- tle Veal Gravy, thicken it with Flour and But- ter, put in a Tea Spoonful of Xemon Pickle, a little Mulhroom Catchup, a Slice of Lemon, a little grated Nutmeg, beat the Yolk of an Egg> and mix it with two Spoonfuls of thick Cream, put it m your Gravy, keep fliaking it over the Fire 'till it looks white and thick, then

put

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 99

put in th^ Lamb Stoijea^ ?ind give them a . Ihake; when they are hot, diOl tjiem up, . and hf round them boUed Force-meat Balls*

To rodji Pig /« Imitation of Lamb.

¦ •

Let your Pig be a Month or five Weeks old, divide it down the Middle, take oflF the Shoul- der, and leave the reft to the hind Part, then . take the Skin oflf,^raw Sprigfe of Parfley all aver the; Qutfide,i which muft be done by running a Skewer or larding Pin, and . fticking the Stalk of the Farfley-in it jfpit it anxi rc&ff it before a quick Fire, dredge it a^d bgifte it well with frefh Butter, roafl it a fine Brown, and fend it up with a Froth on it: Gartliih' with green Parfley, it will eat and look like fat Lamb« - k is eat with Saladi - ^: ^ .. '

To harhicue a Pig.

Dress a Pig. of ten .Weeks old as if it were to be roafted, make a Force-meat of two An- chovies, fix Sage Leaves, and the Liver of the Pig, all chopped very fmall, then put them into a Marble Mortar, with the Crumbs of half a Penny Loaf,, four Ounces of Butter, half a Tea Spoonful of Chyan Pepper, and half a Pint of Red Wine, beat them altogether to a Pafte,, put it in your Pig's Belly and few it up, lay your Pig down at a good Diftance befpre a large brifk Fire, finge it well, put in your Dripping Pan three Bottles of Red Wine, bafte it with the Wine all the Time it is roafting, when it is

N '2 half

100 Tbe £x»BRIEKCtB

half toafted, put under your Pig two Penny Loaves, if you have not Wine enough put in more, when your Pig is near enough, take the Loaves and Sauce out of your Dripping Pan, put to the Sauce one Ancliovy chopped unall, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, and halt a Lemon, boil it a few Minutes, then draw your Pig, pot a fmali Lemon or Apple in the Pig's MoutlL and a Loaf on each Side, flrain your Sauce and pour it on them boiling hot, lay Barbenics and Slices of Letium roimd it, and fend it up whole to the Table.

It is a grand Bottom Diih.-*It wiU take ^ur

Hours roafting.

To bar^icue a Leg of Pork.

Lay down your Leg to a good Fire, put into the Dripping Pan two Bottles of Red Wine, baile your Pork with it all the Time it is roaft- ing, when it is enough, take up what is left in the Pan, put to it two Anchovies, the Yolks of three Eggs boiled hard and pounded fine, with a quarter ora Pound of Butter, add half a Lemon, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a Spoonful of Catchup, and one of Torragon Vinegar, or a little Torragon ihread finall, boil them a few Minutes, thai draw your Pork, and cut the Skin down from the Bottom of the Shank in rows an Inch broad, raife every other row and roll it to the Shank, fhain your Sauce and pour it on boiling hot, lay Oyfter patties all round your Fork, and Sprigs of green Parfley,

1

Ba^GLisH HO USE- KEEPER, loi

TV y?i^ « Chine 0/ Pork.

Tak£ a Chine that has been hung about a Month, boil it half an Hour, then take it -up and make Holes in it all over the lean part^ one Inch from another, ftuff them and betwixt the Joints with ihread Parfley, rub it all over with the Yolk of Eggs, ftrew over it Bread Gnimbs, bafte it, and fet it in a Dutch Oven» when it is enough, lay round it boiled Brocoli, or Hewed Spinage: Garnilh with Parfley.

To roaft a Hamj 6r a Gammon of Bacon.

Half boil your Ham or Gammon, then take off the Skin, dredge it with Oatmeal lifted very fine, bafte it with freih Butter, it will make a ftronger Froth than either Flour or Bread Crumbs, then roaft it, when it is enough, diflt it up and pour brown Gravy on yourDifh: Gamifh with green Parfley and fend it to the Table.

To force the Infide of a Surloin of Beef.

Spit your Surloin, then cutoff from the In* fide all the Skin and Fat together, and then take off all the Flefh to the Bones, chop the Meat very fine, with a little beaten Mace, two or three Shallots, one Anchovy, half a Pint of Red Wine, a little Pepper and Salt, and put it on the Bones again, lay your Fat and Skin on again, and Skewer it clofe and Paper it well,

when

ip^ The Experienced

•when roafted take off the Fat, and Difh up the Surloin, pour over it a Saucie made of a little Red Wine, a Shallot, one Anchovy, two or three Slices of Horfe-radifli, and ferve it up.

Tojiewa Rump of Beef.

Half roaft your Beef,, then put it in a l^rge Sauce Pan or Caldron, with two Quaj-ts of Wa- ter, and one of Red Wine, two or three Blades of Mace, a Shallot, one Spoonful of Lemoa Pickle^ two of Walnut Catchup, the fame of Browning, Chyan Pepper and Salt to your Tailcj let it flew over a gentle Fire clofe co- vered for two Hours, then take up your Beef, and lay it on a deep Difh, fldm off the Fat, and flrain the Gravy, and put in one Ounce of Morel, and half a Pint of Mufhrooms, thicken your Gravy and pour it over your Beef, lay round it Force-meat Balls: Garnifh with Horfe- radifh, and ferve it up.

yl Fricando of Beef.

Cut a few Slices of Beef five or fix Inches long, and half an Inch thick, lard it with Ba- con, dredge it well with Flour, and fet it before a briik Fire to brown, then put it in a Toflinj Pan, with a Quart of Gravy, a few Morels am Truffles, half a Lemon, and ftew them half an Hour, then add one Spoonful of Catchup, the fame of Browning, and a little Chyan, thicken your Sauce and pour it over your Fricando, lay

round

English UOUSE-KEEPER. 103

¦

round them Force-meat Balls, and the Yolks

of hard Eggs.

» ¦

To a-la-mode Beef.

Take the Bone out of a Rump of Beef, lard the Top with Bacon, then niake a Force-meat of four Ounces of Marrow, two Heads of Gar- lick, the Crumbs of a Penny Loaf, a few fweet Herbs chopped fmall, Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt to your Tafte, and the Yolks of tour Eggs well beat, mix it up, and fluff your Beef were the Bone came out, and in feveral Places in the lean part, fkewer it round and bind it about with a Fillet, put it in a Pot with a Pint of Red Wine, and tie it down with ftrong Paper, bake it in the Oven for three Hours; when it comes out, if you want to eat it hot, Ikim the Fat off the Gravy, and add half an Ounce of Morels, a Spoonful of pickled Mufhrooms, thicken it with Flour and Butter, difh up your Beef and pour on the Gravy, lay round it Force-meat Balls, and fend it up.

To make a Porcupine of the Flat Ribs (j/'Beef.

Bone the Flat Ribs, and beat it half an Hour with a Pafte Pin, then rub it over with the Yolks of Eggs, ftrew over it Bread Crumbs, Parfley, Leeks, Sweet Marjoram, Lemon Peel fliread fine, Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt, roll it lip very clofe, and bind it hard, lard it acrofs with Bacon, then a row of cold boiled Tongues, a third row of pickled Cutumbers, a fourth

row

104 The Experienced

row of Lemon Peel, do it all over in rows as »- bove 'till it is larded all round, it will look like red, green, white, and yellow Dices, then Spit it or put it in a deep Pot with a Pint of Water, lay over it the Caul of Veal to keep it from fcdrching, tie it down with ftrong Paper and fend it to the Oven, when it comes out fkioi oflF the Fat, and ftrain your Grivy into a Sauce Pan, add to it two Spoonfuls of^ Red Wine, the fame of Browning, one of Mulhroom Catchup, half a Lemon, thicken it with a Lump of Butter rolled in Flour, difli up the Meat and pour the Gravy on the Difh, lay round Force-meat Balls: Gamifh with Horfe-radifh, and ferve it up.

To make Brisket of Beef a-la-royal.

Bone a Brifket of Beef, and make holes in it with a Knife, about an Inch one from ano- ther, fill one hole with fat Bacon, a fecond with chopped Parfley, and a third with chopped Oyfters, feafoned with Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, 'till you have done the Brilketover, then pour a Pint of Red Wine boiling hot upon the Beef, dredge it well with Flour, fend it to the Oven, and bake it three Hours or better; when it comes out of the Oven take oflF the Fat, and firain the Gravy over your Beef: Garnilh with Pickles, and ferve it up.

Beef Olives.

Gut Slices off a Rump of Beef about fix Inches loog and half an Inch thidk, beat them

with

English HO USE ^KEEPER. 105

xRith a FafteHp^D) and ruib theiik o?er \mth the )(«& of UB Egg, a iktle Pepper, Salp, and bea<* ten Mace, the CFwnhe o§ half a P«u^y Loaf^ two Ounces of Maraiow ftiGed fia^, a Handful of Parflef chopped finally and the OurC-rind oi half a Lemoa grated, ftrew them all over jomx Steaka^ and roll them up, ikewer thena quite dole, and fet them before the Fke to Brown, then put them mtx> a Toffing Pan wkh a Pint of Gravy, a ^^^oonful of Guchup, the fame of Browning, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle^ thicken it with a little Butter rolled in Flour: Lay round Force-meat Balls^ Mufhrooms, or the Yolks of hard Eggs.

T9 maka Mock Hare ^ a Bcafts Heave.

Wash a large Beaft's Heart clean,, and cut

off the Deaf-Ears, aiid (luff it with fome Force-*

poeatf as yau do a Hare, lay a Caul of Veal

oar Paper over the Top,, xo keep in the Stuffings

ToaA it either in a Cradle Spit or a hanging one^

It will take an Hour and a half before a good

Fire, bafte it with Red Wifie; when roafled

. ts^e the Wine out of the Dripping Pan, and

flsim off the Fat^ and add a Glafs more of Wine^

when it is hot put m iboie Lumps of Red Cun-

^pant Jelly, and pour it in the Di0i, ferve it up^

and fend in Red Currant Jelly cu« ine Slices c»i

a Saucer.

Beef Hcait larM.

Take a good*Beaft Heart, ftuff it as before, and lard it all over with little bits of Bacon,

O dull

io6 The ExpERTENCiSc

dull it with Flour, and cover it with Paper, to keep it from being too dry, and fend it to the Oven; when baked put the Heart on your Difli, take off the Fat and ftrain the Gravy through a Hair Sieve, put it in a Sauce Pan with one Spoonful of Red Wine, the fame of Brown- ing, and one of Lemon Pickle, half an Ounce of^ Morels, one Anchovy cut fmall, a litdc beaten Mace, thicken it with Flour and Butter, pour hot on your Heart, andferve it up: Gar- nifli with Barberries.

To ftew Ox Palates.

Wash four Ox Palates in feveral Waters/ and then lay them in warm Water for half an Hour, then wafli them out and put them in a

. Pot, and tie them down with ftrong Paper, and fend them to the Oven with as much Water as will cover them, or boil them 'till tender, then fkin them, and cut them in Pieces half an Inch broad and three Inches long, and put them in a Tolling Pan with a Pint of Veal Gravy, one Spoonful of Madeira Wine, the fame of Catchup and Browning, one Onion

^ ftuck with Cloves, and a Slice of Lemon, ftew them half an Hour, then take out the Onion and Lemon, thicken your Sauce, and put them in a Difli; have ready boiled Artichoke Bot- toms, cut them in Quarters, and lay them over your Palates, with Force-meat Balls and Morels: Garnifli with Lemon, and ferve them up.

To

English HOUSE -KEEPER. 107

%

To frkando Ox Palates,

When you have wafhed and cleaned your Palates as before, cut them in fquare Pieces, lard them with little bits of Bacon, fry th6m in Hog's-lard, a pretty Brown, and put them in a. Sieve to drain the Fat from them,, then take better than half a Pint of Beef Gravy, pne Spoonful of Red Wine, half as much of Browning, a little Lemon Pickle, one Anchovy, a Shalot, and a bit of Horfe-radifli; give them a boil, and flrain your Gravy^ then put in your Palates, and ftew them half an Hour, make your Sauce pretty thick, diflx them up, and lay round them ftewed Spinage prefled and cut like Sippets, and ferve them up.

To fricafey Ox PalateSt

Clean your Palates very well as before, put them in a Stew Pot, and cover them wich Wa- ter, fet them in the Oven for three or four Hours; when they come from the Oven ftrip off the Skins, and cut them in fquare Pieces, feafon them with Mace, Nutmeg, Chyan, and Salt, mix a Spoonful of Flour with the Yolks of two Eggs, dip in your Palates, and fry them a light Brown, then put them in a Sieve to drain; have ready half a Pint of Veal Gravy, with a little Caper Liquor, a Spoonful x)f Browning, and a few Mulhrooms, thicken it well with Flour and Butter, pour it hot on

2 your

J^»^> s.

1098 Tlie Hx^EKit^cto

yourDilh, and lay in your Palates: Garniih with fried Parfley and Bazberies.

Toftew a Turkey with Celery Sauce*

Tak£ a large Turkey, and make a good white Force-fxieat of Veal, and ftuiF the Cnm of the Turkey, ikewer it as for boiling, then boil it in ibft Water 'till it is almoft ^nongh, and then take up your Turkey, and put it in a Pot with fome of the Water it was boiled in, to keep it hot, nut feren or eight Heads of Ge» lery that is warned and cleaned very well into the Water that the Tui^ey was boiled in, 'nil they are tender, then take them up, and put in your Turkey with the Breaft down, and flew it a quarter of an Hour, then take it up, and thicken your Sauce with half a Pound of But- ter and Flour to make it prctty thick, and a quarter of a Pint of rich Cream, then put in your Celery; pour the Sauce and Celery hot upon the Turkey's Breaft, and ferve it up. It is a proper Top Difli for Dinner or Supper.

4

To flew a Turkey hrovm.

- » ?

When you have drawn the Craw out of your Turkey, cut it up the Back and take out the Entrails, that the Turkey may appear whole, and take all the Bones out of the Body very carefully, the Rump^ X^cgs, and Wih p is to be left whole, then tsike the Crumb oi a Penny Loaf, and chop half a hundred of Oy- fters very fmall, with half a Pound of Beef

Marrow,

I

I

English HOUSE-KEEPER, 109

ManoW) a Iktle Lemon Peel cm fine, and P<;p* per and Salt, mix them well up together, with the Yolks of four Eggs, and ftuflf your Turkey with it, few it up and lard it down each Side with Bacon, half roaft it, then put it into a Toffing Pan with two Quarts of Veal Gravy, and cover it clofe up; when it has ftewed one Hour, add a Spoonful of Mulhroom Catchup, half an Anchovy, a Slice or two of Lemon, a little Chyan Pepper, and a Bunch of Sweet Herbs; cover them clofe up again, and ilew ic half an Hour longer, then take it up and ikim the Fat off the Gravy, and ilrain it, thicken it with Flour and Butter, let it boil a few Mi- nutes, and pour it hot upon your Turkey: Lay round it Oyfier Patties, and fenre it up.

Fowls a4a-braize.

Skeweb your Fowl as for boiling, with the Legs in the Body, then lay over it a Layer of hx Bacon, cut in pretty thin Slices, then wrap it round in Beet Leaves, then in a Caul of Veal, and put it into a large Sauce Pan with three Pints of Water, a Glafs of Madeira Wine, a Bunch of fweet Herbs, two or three Blades of Mace» and half a Lemon, ftew it 'till quite tender, take it up and Skim off the Fat, ifxiake your Grayy pretty thick with Flour and Butter, and ihain it thro' a Hair Sieve, and put to it a Pint of Oyfters, a Tea Cupful of thick Cream, keep fhaking your Toffing Pan over the Fire, and when it has fimmered a little, fenre up your Fowl with the Bacon, Beet Leaves, and

Caul

1

no Tlie £XP£RI£NC£D

Caul on, and pour your Sauce hot upon it; Gamifh with Barberries, or red Beet Root.

To force a Fowl.

Take a large Fowl, pick it clean and cut it down the Back, take out the Intrails and take the Skin oflP whole, cut the.Flelh from the Bones, and chop it with half a Pint of Oyfters, one Ounce of Beef Marrow, a little Pepper and Salt, mix it up with Cream, then lay die Meai on the Bones and draw the Skin over it and fow up the Back, then cut large thin Slices of Bacon, and lay them: over the Bread of your Fowl, tie the Bacon on with a pack Thread in Diamonds, it will take one Hour roafting by a moderate Fire, make a ^ood hrown Gravy Sauce, pour it upon your Di(h, take the Bacon off and lay in your Fowl, and ferve it up: Gar*- nifli with Pickles, Muflirtwms, or Oyfters. It is proper for a Side Difh for Dinner, or Top

for Supper.

To frtcafey Chickens.

Skin them and cut them in fmall Pieces^ wafh therti in warm Water, and then dry them very clean with a Cloth, feafon them with Pep per and Salt, and then put them into a Stevr Pan with a little fair Water, and a good Piece of Butter, a little Lemon Pickle, or half a Le- mon, a Glafs of white Wine, one Anchovy, a little Mace and Nutmeg, an Onion ftuck with Cloves, a Bunch of Lemon Thyme and fweet

Marjoraoii

English HOUSE-KEEPER, iti

Marjoram, let them ftew together /till your Chickens are tender, and then lay them^ on yotir Difli, thicken the Gravy with Flour aj»d[ Butter, ftrain it, then beat the Yolks of three Eggs a little, and mix them with a large Tea Cupful of rich Cream, and put it in your Gra- yj and ihake it over the Fire but don't lei it boil, and pour it over your Chickens.

To force Chickens.

Roast your Chickens better than half, take off the Skin, then the Meat, and chop it fmall with ihread Pariley and Crumbs of Bread, Pep- per and Salt, and a little good Ci'eam, then put in the Meat and clofe the Skin, brown it with a Salamander, and ferve it up with White Sauce.

To marinate a Goofc.

Cur your Goofe up the Back-bone, then take out all the Bones, and ftufF it with Force-meat, and fow up the Back again, fry the Goofe a good Brown, then put it into a deep Stew Pan with two Quarts of good Gravy arid cover it clofe, and ftew it two Hours, then take it out and ikim off the Fat, add a large Spoonful of le- . men Pickle, one of Browning, and one of Red Wine, one Anchovy ihread fine, beaten Mace, Pepper, and Salt /to your Palate, thicken with Flour and Butter, boil it a little, dilh up your Goofe, and ftrain your Gravy over it.

Note.

IIZ The EXFERIENCBI>

Note. Make your StufRng thus, lake ten or twelve Ssigc Leaves, two large Onions, two a three large' Iharp Apples fhread them very fine, mix them with the Crumbs of a Peony Loa£ four Ounces of Beef Marrow, one Olafs
Tfl Jlew Ducks.

Take three young' Ducks, lard them down each Side the Breaft, duft them with Flour and fet them before the Fire to brown, then put them in a Stew Pan with a Quart of Water, a Pint of Red Wine, one Spooimil of Walnut Catchup, the fame of Brownings one Anchovy, half a Lemon, a Clove of Garlick, a Bundle of fweet Herbs, Chyan Pepper to your TsACf let them ftew flowly for half an Hour or 'till they are tender, lay them on a Diflx and keep them hot, fkim off tlie Fat, ftrain your Gravy through a Hair Sieve, add to it a few Mpreli and Trui&es, boil it quick 'till reduced to Uttk more than half a Pint, pouor it over youir DvKka and ferve it up^

It is proper for a Side Diih for I^jwer* or

Bottom for Supper.

To

English HpU^E-KEEE.ER. 113

To flew Ducks wjtlf Green Peas.

Hal? roaft your Diicks, then put them. into a Ste\y Pan with a Pint of good Uravy, a little Mint, and three or four Sage Leaves chopped fmall, cover them clofe and ftew them halt an Hour, boil a Pint of Green Peas as for eating, and put them in after you have thickened the Gravy, difli up your Ducks, and pour Uie Gravy and Peas over them*

. . Ducks a-Ia braize.

Dress, and finge your Ducks, lard th'em

Suite through with Bacqn rolled in fhread Par- ey, Thyme, Qhions, beaten Mace, Cloves, Pepper .and Saltj put in the bottom of fi Stew Pan a few Slices of fat Bacon, . the fame of Ham or Gammon of Bacon, two or three Slices of Veal or Beef, lay your Ducks in with the Bread down, and cover the Ducks with Slices the fame as put under them, cut in a Carrot or two, a Turnip, one Onion, a head of Celery, a Blade of Mace, four or five Cloves, a little whole Pepper, cover them clofe down, and let theru fimmer a little over a gentle Siove 'till the Breaft is a light Brown,, then put in fome Brofh or. Water, cover them as clofe down again as. you can, ftew them gently betwixt two and three ' Hours 'till enough, then take Parfley, Onion or Shallot, two Anchovies, a few Gherkins or Ca- pers, chop them all very fine, put them in a Stew Pan with part of the Liquor from the

P Ducks,

114 The Experienced .

Ducks, a little Browning, the Juke of half a Le- mon, boil it up, and cut the Ends of the Mcon even with the Breaft of your Ducks, lay. them on your t>xQiy pour the Sauce hot upon tnem, and ferve them up, fome jj^ut Gaiuck inftead of Onions. .

Ducks a-ia-mode»

Sl I T two Ducks down the Back, and Bone them carefully, make a Force-meat of the €rumbs of a Penny Loaf, four Oimces of fat Bacon fcraped, a little Parfley, Thyme, Lemon Peel, two Shallots or Onions ihread very fine, with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg to your Tafte, and two Eggs, ftufF your Ducks with it and few them up, lard them down each Side of the BreaH with Bacon, dredge them w6ll with Flour, and put them in a Dutch Oven to Brown, then put tnem into a Stew Pan with three Pints of Gravy, a Glafs of Red Wine, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a large one of Wal- nut and Mulhroom Catchup, one of Browning, and one Anchovy, with Chyan Pepper to your Taile, ftew them gentlv over a flow Fire for an Hour, when enougn, thicken your Gravy and put in a few Truffles and Morels, ftrain your Gravy and pour it upon them.- You may a-la*mode a Goofe the fame way.

Pidgcons compote,

« _

Take fix young Pidgeons and fkewer them as you do for boiling, put. Force-meat into the

Craws,

English HOUSE -KEEPER. us

Craws^ lard them down the Breaft and fry them Brown, then put them into ftrong brown Gra- vy, and let them ftew three quarters of an Hour, thicken it with a Lump or Butter rolled in Hour,' when you Difh them up, lay Force- meat Balls round them,, and ilrain the Gravy over them. - ^The Force-meat muft be made thus; grater the Crumbs of half a Penny Loaf, and fcrape . a quaner of a Pound of fat Bacon inftead of. Suet, chop a little Pariley, Thyme, two Shallots or an Onion, grater a little Nut- meg, Lemon Peel, fome Pepper and Salt, mix them all up with Eggs.

It is proper for a Top Difli for fecond courfe,

or a Side Dim for the firft.

Hdgeons itt a Hole,

Pick, draw, and waflx four young Pidgeons, flick their Legs into their Belly as you do boil- ed Pidgeons, feafon them with Pepper, Salt, and beaten Mace, put into the Belly of every Pidgeon, a Lump of Butter the Size of a Wal- nut, lay your Pidgeons in a Pye Difli, pour over them a Batter made of three Eggs, two Spoonfuls of Flour, and half a Pint of good Milk, bake it in a moderate Oven, and ferve them to Table in the fame Dilh.

Pidgepns tranfmogartfied.

Pi ck, and clean fix fmall young Pidgeons, but do not cut off their Heads, cutof their Pi- nions, and boil them, ten ^%il in Water,

P 2 V i^i^K then

.• O'r.'

ti6 The Experienced

' then cut oflf the Ends of fix large Cucumbers and fcrape out the Seeds, put in your Pigeons, but let the Heads be cut at the Ends of the Cuci^mbers, and ftick a Bunch of Barberries in their Bills, and then put them into a Tof- fing Pail with a Pint of Veal Gravy, a little An- chovy, a Olafs of Red Wine, a Spoonful of Browning, a little Slice of Lemon, Chyan and Salt to your Tafte, ftew them feven Minutes, take them out, thicken your GraVy with a lit- tle Butter rolled in Flour, boil it up and ftrain it over your Pigeoijs, and ferve it up.

To broil Pigeons,

Take young Pigeons, pick, and draw them, fplit them down the Back, atid feafon them with Pepper and Salt, lay them on the Gridiron, with the Bread upward, then turn them, but be careful yoi; do not burn the Skin, rub them over with Butter and keep turning them 't'dl they are enough, dilh them up, and lay round them cpifpcd Parfley, and pour over them melt- ed Butter, or a Gravy wnich you pleafe, and fend them if p.

To boil Pig^eons in Rice,

When you have pickled and drawn your Pigeons, turn the Legs under the Wings, and •cut off the Pinipns, then lay over every Pid- geon ihin Slices of Bacqn, and a large Be^t Leaf, wrap them in clean Cloths feparately, ^Xkd boil them 'till enough, have ready four

Qupc?s

English H'oUSE- KEEPER. 117

Ounces of Rice boiled foft and put into a Sieve to drain, put the Rice into a little good Veal Gravy thickened with . Flour and Butter, boil your TRice a little in the Gravy, and add two SpoohfiU of good Cream, take your Pigeons out of the Cloths and leave on the Bacon and Beet Leaves, pour the Rice over them and ferve tlitm up*

s

Tofricando Pigeons,

Pick, draw, and wafh your Pigeons very- clean, ftuff the Craws, and lard them down the Sides of the Breaft, fry them in Butter a fine Brown, and then put them into a Tofling Pan with a Quart of Gravy, ftew them 'tiU they are tender, then take off the Fat, and put ia a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a large Spoonful or Browning, the fame of Walnut Catchup, a little Chyan and Salt, thicken your Gravy and add hair an Ounce of Morels, and four Yolks of hard Eggs, lay the Pigeons in your Difli, and put the Morels and Eggs round them, and ftram your Sauce over them: Gar- nifh with Barberries and Lemon Peel, and ferve it up,

Ju^ed Pigeons.

Take fix Pigeons, pluck and draw them, wafli them clean and dry them with a Cloth, feafon theca with beaten Mace, white Pepper and Salt, put them in a Jug, and put half a Pound of Butter upon them, ftop up your Jug

clofe

ii8 The. £xperienc£d

clpfe with a Cloth that no Steam can get cm fee it in a Kettle of boiling Water, and let ^ boil one Hour and a Half, then take out yoi Pidgeons, and put the Gravy that is come noi the Pidgeons mto a Pan, and put to it on^ Spoonful of Wine, one of Catchup, a Slice Lemon-, half an Anchovy chopped fmall, a a Bundle of fweet Herbs, boil it a little, thick it with a little Butter rolled in Flour, lay yo Pidgeons on the Di£h, and ftrain the Gravy od them: Gamifli with Parfley and red Cabbage^ and ferve them up, you may lay Mulhrooms or Force-meat Balls,

It is a pretty Side or Comer Difh.

Boiled Pidgeons and Bacon.

Take fix young Pidgeons, Wafli them clean as before, turn their Legs under their Wings, boil them in Milk and Water by themfelves twenty Minutes, have ready boiled a fquare Piece of Bacon, take off the Skin and Brown it, put the Bacon in the Middle of your Difh, and lay the Pidgeons round it, and Lumps of ftewed Spinage, pour plain melted Butter over them^ and fend Parfley and Butter in a Boat.

Pidgeons fricafey.

*

Cut your Pidgeons as you would do Chick- ens for fricafey, fry them a light Brown, then put them into fome good Mutton Gravy, and new them near half an Hour, and then put in half an Ounce of Morels, a Spoonful of Brown- ing,

English HO USE -KEEPER. 119

ing^ and a Slice of Lemon, take up your Pid- g^eons and thicken your Gravy, ftrain it over your Pidgeons, and lay i:ound them Force-meat Balls^ and GarniOi with Pickles.

Partridge in panes,

. Ha l f roaft two Partridges, and take the Fleth iirom them, and mix it with the Crumbs of a Penny Loaf fteeped in rich Gravy, fix Ounces of Beef Marrow, or half a Pound of fat Bacon fcraped, ten Morels boiled toh and cut fmall, two Artichoke Bottoms boiled and Jfliread fmall^ the Yolks of three Eggs, Pepper, Salt, Nut- megs and fhrekd Lemon Peel to your Palate, work them together, and bake them, in Moulds the fliape of an Egg, and ferve them up cold or in Jelly; Garnim with curled Parfley.

To fiew Partridges.

Truss your Partridges as for roafting; ftufF the Craws, and lard them down each Side of the ^eaft, then roll a Lump of Butter in Pep- per, Salt, and beaten Mace, and put it into the Bellies, fow up the Vents, dredge them well and fry them a light Brown, then put them, into a Stew Pan with a Quart of good Gravy, a Spoonful of Madeira Wine, tne fame of' Mumroom Catchup, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, and half the Quantity of Mufhroom Powder, one Anchovy, half a Lemon, a Sprij of Sweet Marjoram, cover the Pan clofe, ant ftew them half an Hour, then take them out

and

I20 The EXPER.IENCED

and thicken the Gravy, boil it a little, and pour it over the Partridges, and lay ronnd them Ar- tichoke Bottoms boiled and cut' in Quarters, and the Yolks of four hard Eggs if agreeable.

To ftew Partridges a fecond Way,

9

Tjt CE three Partridges, when drefled, linge them, blanch and beat three Ounces of Al- mprids, and grate the fame Quantity of fine white Bread, chop three Anfchoyies, mix them with fix Ounces pf Butter, ftilfF the Partridges and fow them up at both Ends, trufs them and Wfip Slices of fat Bacon round them, half roaft them, then take one and pull the Meat off the Breaft, and beat it in a Marble Mortar,,   with the Force-meat it was fluffed with, have i ready a ftrohg Gravy made of Ham and VeaJ, ftrain it into a Stew Pan, then take the Bacon off the other two, wipe them clean, and put them j into the Gravy with a good deal of Shalots, \ let thenr ftew 'till tender,' then take them out, *^ and boil the Gravy 'till it is almoft as thick as Bread Sauce, then add to it a Glafs of Sweet Oil, the fame of Champagne, and the Juice of a China Orange, put your Partridges in, and make them hot: Garnifh with Slices of Bacon and Lemon.

To jlev) a Hare.

When you have paunched and cafed your Hare, cut her as for eating, put her into a large Sauce Pan, with three Pints of Beef

Gravy,

English HOtJSEi=KEEPER. 121

Gftiyy, a Pifat of R^ Wine, a large Onion Stack, with Glores, sL Bundle of Winter Savory, a Slice of Horfe^radiih, two Blades ^ beateii MacCf oat Anchovy, a S]^oohful of Walnut et Muni Gatthu^, one of Browning, half a Le- D[K>n, Ctiyan and S^t to your Tafte, put on a dofe Cover, and fet it dver a gentle Fire, and ftew it fOi- two Hours, then take it up into a Soup DHh, and thicken your Gravy with a Lump of Butter rolled in Flour, hotl it a littld, aad ftrain it over your Hate: Oamiih with J.enion Peel cut like Straws, and fcrve it u >.

r

To jug a Hwc.

-- Cut the Hare as for (bating, feafon it Nvith Pqiper, Salty and beaten Mace^ put it into a Jug or Pitcher, with a clofe Top, put to it a Bundk of fweet Herbs, and fet it in a Kettle of boiling Water, let it (land 'till it is tender, I* then take it up and pour the Gravy into a Toffing Fan, With a Giafg of Red Wirte, on^ Anchovy, a large Onion fttick with Cloves, a little beaten Macfe, and Chyan Pejpper to vour Tafte, boil it a Httle and thicken it; dim up your Hare and ftraia the Cravy over it, then fend it up.

To florendine a Hare«

Tare a giown Hare and let her hang up fbur or five Days, then cafe her, and leave on the Ears, and trice out all the Bones except the Head, which jsuft be left on whole, lay

Q; your

122 ''' The Experienced

yolir Hare flat on the Table, aiid lay over the Infide a Force-hieatj and then roll it lip to the Head, Ikewer it with the Head and Ears lean- ing back, tie it with Pack-thread as you would a Collar of Veal, wrap it in a Cfloth and boil it an Hoi^r and a half in a Sauce Pan, with a clofe Cover on it, with two Quarts of Water-, when your Liquor is reduced to one Quart, put in a Pint of Red Wine, a Spoonful ot Lemon Pickle, \^ and one of Catchup, the fame oi Browning, and ftew it 'till it is reduced to a Pint^ thicken it with Butter rolled in Flour, lay round your Hare a few Morels, and four Slices of Force-meit, boiled in a Caul of a Leg of Veal; when you difli it up, draw the . Jaw-bones, and Hick them in the Eyes for Horns, let the Ears lie back on the roll, and ftick a Sprig Of Myrtle in the Mouth, ftrain over your Sauce, and ferve it it up: Oamiibi with Barberries and Parfley.

- Forced-meat for the Hare: Take the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, the Liver fhread fioie, half a Pound of fat Bacon fcraped, a Glafs of Red Wine, one Anchovy, two Eggs, a little Winter Savory,, Sweet Marjoram, Lemon, Thyme, Pep- per, Salt, and >Jutmeg to your Tafte,

To florendine Rabbits.

T/KE "three young Rabbits, fkin them, but leave on the Ears, walh and dry them with ia Cloth, take out the Bones carefully, leaving the Head whole, then lay jhem flat, make a

Force-meat

'

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 123

Fprce-meat of a quarter of a- Pound of Bacon

fcraped, it anfwers bettet than Suet, it makes

the Rabbits eat tenderer arid whiter, add to the

Bacon the Crumbs of a Penny Loaf, a little

Lexnon Thyme, or Lemon Peel fhread fine,

Parfley choppied fmall. Nutmeg, Chyan and

Salt to your Palate, mix them up together with

^^ ^SS* ^^^ fpread it over the Rabbits, roH

them up to the Head, fkewer them ftrait, ^nd

clofe the Ends to prevent .the Force-meat from

coming out, flcewer the Ears.back and tiethem

in feparate Cloths and boil them half an Hour;

when you difli them up take out the Jaw-bones

and flick them in the Eyes^for Ears, put round

them Force-meat Balls and Muflirooms, have

ready a white Sauce made of Veal Gravy, a

little Anchovy, the Juice of half a Lemon, or

a Tea Spoonful of Lemoii Pickle^ ftrain it, take

a quarter of a Pound of Butter rolled in Flour,

fo as to make the Sauce j^retty chick, keep-ftir-

ing it whilft the Flour is diflblvin^^ beat the

Yolk of an Egg, put to it fome thick Cre^ira,

Nutmeg and Salt, mix. it with the Gravy, and

let it fimmer a little over the Fire, but not boil,

for it will Curdle the Creani, pour it over the

ftabbits and ferve it up.

. . Ksihhit& Jurprized.

Take young Rabbits, fkewer them and put the fame Pudding a$ for the roafted Rabbits, when they are roafted, draw out the Jaw-bones and ftick them in the Eyes to appear like Horns, then take off rail the Meat from the B^ck clean

0² frona

1*4 The ^.xp^ni Vl
«

fnxn the ^ones, bu^ les^ve them whele, cbep the Me<(t exceeding £oe with a little ihread P^r- fley, Lemon Peel, pnij Ounce of Beef Mairqw, a Spoonful of good Cream, and a little Ssik; beat t^ Yolks of two hard Eggs, and a Pieol of Putter the Si^^ of ^ Walnut, in 9, Mwpbh ^ortar, very fine, thep ipix all toee^d** fjni put it in a Toffing PaQ, wh^i it \^ ftewed pye Minutes, lay it on the Itabbit where yoa tool^ the Meat off, s^nd put it elofe down with your Hand, to appear like a whole Kubbit, then hegkt {t Sal^pagpdier, aud Srown it all oyer, pour a good QrQwn Orayy nude as thick u C^eana, m the Pjib, ftick a Sunch of Myrtle in their Mouths, a^d fenre them up witch, their l^iyer^ bfcaled apd frothed.

Tq frwafiy Rabbits Brown»

Cut up your Rabbits as for eating, fry them in Butter, a light Srown, put them into a ' Toging Pan, with a Pint of Water, ft Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a lar^ ^oonful of Muihroom Catchup, the fame of Browning, e^e AnchQvy, a Slice of Lemon, Chyan Pepper, and Salt to your Tafte, flew them oyer a flow Fire 'till they are enough, thicken your Gravy, ^nd drain it, diih up your H^bbits, and pour the Gravy bver.

To fticafty Rabbits White,

ty
i

J

Engli«h HOV$E-KERfER. 125

9 Tea S^cwnful of {^^csoo Pickk, one A»- ciiQvy, A Slic« of I^^moii, » litde b^tisn Mac«, Ctiyan l^pper, «iid &i],t, ftew them over a ilovr Fire, wh^n fKey are f^Qugh, thicken youf

Gri^vy w}t^ FjiOiF find Butter, drain it, theQ add the Ydiks of two Eggs mixed with a larg4 Tea Cupful of thick Cream, and a little Nut- meg grated in it, don't let it boil, and ferve it up.

n .M I ^1- - - ^^^- - ^- -I- 1

CHAP. V.

Okfirv^ti^m on Pies.

RAISED Pies fhould have a quick 0?en, and well cloCed up, or your Pye will fall in the Sides; it fhould have no Water put in, 'till the Minute it goes to the Oven, it makes ^ the Cruft fad, and is a great Hazard of the Pye ' running.-- Li^it Paflc requires a moderate Oven,' hat not too i9ow, it will nuke them fad, and a quick Oven will catch and bum it, and not give it Time to rife; Tarts that are iced, require a flow Oven, or the Iceing will be firown, and the Pafte not be near bakedL^-^Thefit Sort of Tarts oughc to be made of Sugar Pafte, . and rolled very thin.

To ntakf cpijp VdSHt fir Tarti.

Take one Pound of fine Flour mixed with one Ounce of Loaf Sugar beat and fifted, make it into a ftifT Pafte yt'nh a Gill of boiling Cream,

and

ii6 The Experienced

and three Ounces of Butter in it, work it well, roll it very thin, when you hate made your Tarts, beat the White oi an Egg a little, rub it over them with a Feather,- fift a little double refined Sugar over them, and bake them in a moderate Oven.

Iceing a fecond Way.

Beat the White of an Egg to a ftrong Froth, put in by Degrees four Ounces of double re- fined Sugar, with as niuch iSum as will lie on a Six-pence, beat and fifted fine, beat them half an Hour, then lay it over your Tarts the thicknefs of a Straw.

To maki a light Pafte for Tarts^

Take one Pound of fine Flour, beat the White of an Egg to a ftrong Froth, mix it; widi as much Water as will make three quarters of a Pound of Flour into a pretty ftiff Pafte, roll it out very thin, lay the third Part of half a Pound of Butter in thin Pieces, dredge it with Part of the quarter of your Flour left out far that Purpofe, roll it up tight, then with your Pafte Pin roll it out again, do fo until all your half Pound of Butter and Flour is done, cut it in fquare Pieces, and make your Tarts j it re- quires a quicker Oven than crifp Pafte.,

To make Pafte for tf -Goofe Pye.

* . <. ¦ « -• • '

Take eighteen Pounds of fine Flour^ put fix Pounds of frefli Butter, and one Pound of ren- dered

i

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 127

i

'' dered Beef Suet in a Kettle of Water, boil it two or three Minutes, then pour it boiling hot upon your Flour, work it well into a pretty ftifF Pafte, pull it in Lumps to cool, and raife your Pye, bake it in a hot Oven; you may make any raifed Pye the fame Way; only take a fmaller Quantity in Proportion.

To make a cold Pafte fir dijh Pics.

Take a Pound of fine Flour, rub it into half a Pound of Butter, beat the Yolks of two Eggs, put them into as .much Water as will make it a ftifF Pafte, roll it out, then put your Butter on in thin Pieces, duft it with Flour, roll it up. tight, when you have done it fo for three Times, roll it out pretty thin, and bake it in a quick Oven,

To make Pafte for Cuftards.

Put half a Pound of Butter in a Pan of Water, take two Pounds of Flour, when your Butter boils, pour it on your Flour, with as much Water as will make it into a good Pafte, work it well, and when it has cooled a little, raife your Cuftards, put a. Paper round the Iniide of them, when they are half baked fill them. - When you make any Kind of Dripping Pafte, boil it four or five Minutes in a good Quantity of Water to take the Strength off it; when you make a cold Cruft with Suet, fliread it fine, rub Part of it into the Flour, then make

. it

fl8 The ExPEltlEKGBD

1

if Into a Pafie, and roll it out as hcfort, {
To make a Ficiich Pyc* !

J \

To two Pounds of Flour, put three quartcn of a Pound of Butter, make it inttx a Pafte, and raife the Walls of the Pye, then roll out fome Pafte thin as for a Lid, cut it into Vine Leaves, or the Figures of any Moulds you have, if you have no Moulds, you may make Ufe of a Crocran, and pick out pretty Shaped^ beat die Yolkft of two Eggs, and rub the Outiide of the Walls of the Pye with it, and lay the Vine Leaves or Shapes round the Walls, and rub them over with the Eggs, fill the Pye with the Bones of the Meat, to keep the Pye in Shape, and lay a thin Lid on to keep the Steam in, that the Cruft may be well foaked; it is to go to Table without a Lid,

Take a Calf's Head, wafli and clean it Wfll, boil it half an Hour, when it is cold cut it ifl thin Slices, and put it in a Toffing Pan, with three Pints of veal Gravy, and three Sweet Breads cut thin, and let it flew one Hour, with half an Ounce of Morels, and half an Ounce of Truffles, then have ready two Calves Feet boiled and boned, cut them m &nall Pieces, and put them into your Toffing Pan, with fl Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, and one of Brown- ing, Chyan Pepper, and a little Salt, when the Meat is tender, thicken the Gravy a Iktle with Flour and Butter, flrain it, and, p^t in a few

pickled

\ English HOUSE-KEEPER. 129

I pickled Mulhrcx>ms, but freih ones if you cant

get them,) put the Meat into the Pye you took

, the Boixes out, and lay the niceft Part at the

[ Top, have ready a quarter of a Hundred of

Afparagus Heads, ftrew them over the Top of

tlie Pye, and ferve it up.

A Yorkjhire Goofc Pye.

Take a large fat Goofe, fplit it down the Back, and take all the Bones out, bone a Turn- key, and two Ducks, the fame Way, feafon them very well with Pepper and Salt, with fix Woodcocks, lay the Goofe down on a clean Difh, with the Skin-fide down, and lay the Turkey into the Goofe, with the Skin down, have ready a large Hare cleaned Well, cut in Pieces, and ftewed in the Oven, with a Pound of Butter, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace beat fine, the fame of White Pepper, and Salt to your Tafte, 'till the Meat will leave the Bones, and fcum the Butter off the Gravy, pick the Meat clean ofi^, and beat it in a Marble Mor- tar very fine with the Butter you took off, and lay it in the Turkey, take twenty-four Pounds of the fineft Flour, fix Pounds of But- ter, half a Pound of frefli rendered Suet, make the Pafte pretty ftifF, and raife the Pye oval, roll out ^, Ltimp of Pafte, and cut it in Vine Leaves, or what form you pleafe, rub the Pye with the Yolks of Eggs, and put on your Ornaments on the Walls, then turn the Hare, Turkey, and Goofe Upfide down, and lay them in your Pye, with the Ducks at

R each

130 The ExpjcRiENCED

each End, and the Woodcocks on the Sides^ ) make your Lid pretty thick, and put it on; you may lay Flowers, or the Shape of the Fowls in Pafte, on the Lid, and make a Hole in the Middle of your Lid; the Walls of the Pye is to be one Inch and a half higher thaa the Lid, then rub it all over with the Yolks of Eggs, and bind it round with three-fold Paper, and lay the fame over the Top; it will take four Hours baking in a browti Bread Oven, when it comes out nlelt two Pounds of Butter in the Gravy that comes from the Hare, and pour it hot in the Pye through a Tun-dilh, clofe it well up, and let it be eight or ten Days before you cut it; if you fend it any Diftance, make up the Hole in the Middle with cold Butter, to prevent the Air from getting in.

A Hare Pye.

* ' -. • •

Cut a large Hare in Pieces, feafon it ¦well ¦with Mace, Nutmeg, Pepper^ and Salt, put it in a Jug, with halt a Pound of. Butter, cover it clcne up with a Pafte or Cloth, fet it in a Copper of boiling Water, and let it jftew one Hour and a half, then take it out to cool, and make a rich Force-meat of a quarter of. a. Pound of fcraped Bacon, two Onions, a Glafs of Red Wine, the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, a little Winter Savory, the Liver cut fmall, a little Nutmeg, feafon it high with Pepper, and Salt, mix it well up with the Yolks of three Eggs, raife the Pye and lay the Force-meat in tnc Bottom, lay in the Hare, with the Gravy that

ca0iC'

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 131

: came out of the Hare, lay the Lid on, and put ' Jlowers or Leaves on it; it will take an Hour and a half to bake it. v

It is a handfome Side Difh for a large Table.

A Salmon Pye.

Boil your. Salmon as for eating, take off the Skin, and all the Bones out, and pound the Meat in a Mortar very fine, with Mace> Nutmeg, Pep- per, and Salt to your Tafte, raife the Pye, and put Flowers or Leaves on the Walls, put the Salmon in and Lid it, bake it an Hour and a half, when it comes out of the Oven take off the Lid, and put in four Ounces of rich melted Butter, cut a Lemon in Slices, and lay over it. Hick in two or three Leaves of Fennel, and fend it to Table without a Lid.

A Beef Steak Pye.

Beat five or fix Rump Steaks very well with a paffe Pin, arid feafon them well with Pepper and Salt, lay a good puff Pafte round the Difli, and put a little Water in the Bottom, then lay the Steaks in, with a Lump of Butter upon every. Steak, and put on the Lid, cut a little * Pafte in what form you pleafe and lay it on.

A Thatched Houfe Pye.

Take an Earthen Difh that is pretty deep,

I mb the iniide with two Ounces of Butter, then

fpread over it two Ounces of Vermicelli, make

R 2 a

13» Tlic Experienced

a good puff Pafte, and roll it pretty thick, and lay it on the Difh; take three or four Pigeons, feafon them very well with Pepper, and Salt, and put a good Lump of Butter in them, and lay them in the Dim with the Breaft down, and put a thick Lid over them, and hake it in a moderate Oven; when enough, take the Difh you intend for it, and turn the Pyc on to it, and the Vermicelli will appear like Thatch, which gives it the Name or Thatched Houfe Pye.

It is a pretty Side or Corner Dilh for a lai^ Dinner, or a Bottom for Supper.

Egg and Bacon Pyc to eat cold.

Steep a £ew thin Slices of Bacon all Night in Water to take out the Salt, lay yoiu: Bacoa in the Difh, beat eight Eggs, with a Pint of thick Cream, put in a little Pepper and Salt, and pour it on the Bacon, lay over it a good cold Raftc, bake it a Day before you want it, in a moderate Oven.

A Calf 's-Hcad Pye.

J*ARfeoiL a Calf's-Head, when cold cut it in Pieces, feafon it well with Pepper and Salt, put it in a raifed Cnift, with half a Pint of ftrong Gravy, bake it an Hour and a half, when it comes out of the Oven cut off the Lid, and chop the Yolks of three hard Eggs fmall, ftr6w them oyer ihe Top of the Pye, and lay three or

four Slices of lemon, and pour on ismt good

toelced

Ei^GLisH HOUSE-KEEPER. 135 xnelced Butter, and fend it to Table without a

A favory Chicken Pye.

Let your Chickens be fmall, feafdn them with Mace, Pepper and Sah, put a Lump of Butter into every one of them, lay them in the Diflx with the Breafts up, and lay a thin Slice of Bacon over them, it will give them a pleafant Flavour, then put in a Pint of ftrong Gravy^ and make a goojd puff Pafte, lid it and bake it in a moderate Oven y French Cooks generally put Morels and Yolks of Eggs chopped fmalL

A Mince Pye.

' Bo 1 L a Neat's Tongue two Hours, then Ikin

it, and ch^p it as fpiall as poffible, chop very

{mail three Pounds of frelh Beef Suit, three

Pounds of good baking Apples, four Pounds

of Currants clean warned, picked, and well

dryed before the Fire, one Pound of Jar Rai-

fins ftoned and chopped fmall, and one Poimd

of Powder Sugar, mix them all together, with

half an Ounce of Mace, the fame of Nutmeg

g;rated, Cloves and Cinnamon a quarter of an

Ounce of each, and one Pint of French Brandy,

and make a rich puff Pafte j as you fill the Pye

up, put in a little candied Citron and Orange cut

in little Pieces, what you have to fpare, put clofe

down in a Pot and cover it up, put no Citron

nor Orange in 'till you ufe it.

A

L

134 "^^^ •Experienced

»

A Codling Pyc.

Gat HER fmall Codlings, put them in a clean Brafs Pan with Spring Water, lay Vine Leaves on them, and cover them with a Cloth wrap- ped round the cover of the Pan to keep in the Steam, when they grow foftifli peel oflf the Skin, and put them in the fame Water with the Vine Leaves, hang them a great height over the Fire to green, when you fee them a fine green, take them out of the Water and pm them in. a deep Difli, with as much Powder or Loaf Sugar as will fweeten them, make the Lid of rich puiF Pafte and bake it, when it; comes from the Oven take off the Lid, and cut it in little Pieces like Sippets, anc^ftick them round the infide of the Pye with the Points upward, pour over your Codlings i. good Cuf-

tard made thus, Boil a Pint of Cream, with

a flick of Cinnanaon, and Sugar enough to it a little fweet, let it ftand 'till cold, then

put in the Yolks of four Eggs well beaten, let it on the Fire and keep iftirring it 'till it grows thick, but do not let it boil, left it Cur- dle, then pour it into your Pye, pare a litde Lemon thin, cut the Peel like Straws, and lay it on your Codlings over the Top.

An Herb Vy^ for Lent.

Take Lettice, Leeks, Spinage, Beets, and Parfley, of each a Handfol, give them a boil, then chop them fmall, and Imve ready boiled

in

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 135

in a Cloth one Quart of Groats, with two ot three Onions in mem, put them in a Frying Pan with the Herbs, and a good deal of Salt, a Pound of Butter, and a few Apples cut thin, flew them a few Minutes over the Fire, fill your Difh or raifed Cruft with it: One Hour " bake it, then ferve it up.

^ Venifon Pafty.

Bone a Breaft or Shoulder of Venifon, fea- fon it well with Mace, Pepper, and Salt, lay it in a deep Pot with the bell Part of a Neck of Mutton cut in Slices and laid over the Venifon, pour in a large Glafs of Red Wine, put a coarfe Pafte over it, and bake it two Hours in an Oven, then lay the Venifon in a Dilh, and pour the Gravy over it, and put one Pound of outterover it; make a good Puff Pafte, and lay it near half an Inch thick round the Edge of the Difh, roll out the Lid which muft be 1^ little thicker than the Pafte on the Edge of the Dilh, and lay it on, then roll out another Lid pretty thin, and cut it in Flowers, Leaves or whatever Form you pleafe, and lay it on the Lid; if you don't want it, it will keep in the Pot that it was baked in eight or ten Days, but keep the Cruft on to prevent the Air from ;etting it. - ^A Breaft and Shoulder of Venifon is the moft proper for a Pafty.

^ Hottentot Pyc.

Boil and bone two Calf's-Feet^ clean very well a Calf VChitterling, boil it and chop it

fmall.

1^6 The ExferiAnced

fmall, take two Chickens and cut them up as for eating, put them in a Stew Pan, with two Sweet Breads, a Qijart of Veal or Mutton Gravjr, half an* Ounce of Morels, Ghyan Pepper and Salt to your Falate> flew them all tos^ether an Hour over a gentle Fire, then put in fix Force* meat Balls that have been boiled, and the Yolks of four hard Eggs, and put them in a good raifed Cruft that have been baked for it, ftrew over the Top of your Pye, a few green Peas boiled as for eating; or peel and cut fome young green Brocoli Stalks about the Size of Peas, give them a gentle boil, and ftrew them over the Top of your Pye, and fend it up hot with- out a Lid, the fame way as the French Pye.

\/4 Bride s Pye.

Boil two Calf's-Feet, pick the Meat from the Bones and chop it very fine, fhread fmall one Pound of Beef Suet and a Pound of Apples, waih and pick one Pound of Currants very fmall, dry them before the Fire, ftone and chop a quarter of a Pound of Jar Raifins, a quarter of an Ounce of Cinnamon, the fame of Mace and Nutmeg, two Ounces of candied Citron, two Ounces of candied Lemon cut thin, a Glafi of Brandy, and one of Champaign, put them in a China Difh with a rich puff Pafte over it, roll another Lid and cut it in Leaves, Flowers, Figures, and put a Glafs Ring in it*

Jn

English HQUSErK^^PER. 137

An Eel Py^.

SkIn and wa(h youf Eels very clean, cut them in Pieces one Inch an4 a half long, fea- fon them with Pepper, Salt, and a little dried $^ge rubbed fmall, raife your pies about the Sije of the In^de of a Plate, fill yom* Pies with Eels, lay a Ljd qyer them, and bake them in * quick Oven^ they require to he veil haked.

^ York/hire Gihlct Pyc,

When the Bipod is warm put in 4 Te^ ^^iP^ ful of Groats to fwelj, grs^te the Crupil? of % Pejiny Loaf, and ppur a Gill of boilipg Millf on thi^m, flir^ad Ijalf a Poiwid of Beef Suep very fine c^op two X^eeks,, and fpur or five Leaves or Sage fmaU, three Yolks of Eggs, Pepper, B^lt, and Nutmeg to your Palate^ mi? them all up togefher, have risady the Cjblets feafoned very well with Pepper, and Salt, arid lay them round a deep Pifh, then put a Pound of fat Beef over the Pudding, in the .Middle erf the Djih, ppur ip h*lf a Pint of Gravy^ lay oji ^ good Pafte, and bat:^ it in a pioderate Oven.

A Rook Pyc»

Skin jiiid draw fix young Rooks, and cut out the Back Bones, fcafon them well with Pepper and Salt, put them in a deep Difli, with ft quarter of a ^int of Water, lay over . them

S half

rsS The Experienced

half a Pound of Butter, make a good puff Pafte, and cover the Difli, lay a Paper over, for it requires a good deal of baking.

A fiveet Veal Pyc.

Lay Marrow or Beef Suet fhread very fine in the Bottom of your Difh, cut into Steaks the bell End of a Neck of Veal, and lay them in, ftrew over them fome Marro^c or Suet, it makes them eat tenderer, ftone a Quarter of a Pound of Jar Raifins, chop them a little, wafli half a Pound of Currants, and put them over the Steaks, cut three Ounces or candied Citron, and two Ounces of candied Orange, and lay them on the Top, boil half a Pint of Sweet Mountain or Skck, with a ftick of Cinnamon, and pour it in, lay a light Pafte round the Diihand then lid it, an Hour will bake it; when it comes out of the Oven, put in a Glafs of French Brandy or Shrub, and ferve it up.

An Olive Pye.

Cut a Fillet of Veal into thin Slices, rub them over with the Yolks of EggSf ftrew over them a few Crumbs of Bread, mread a little Lemon Peel very fine, and put it on thena with a little grated Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, rdl them up very tight, and lay them in a t^ewter Difh, pour over them half a Pint of good Gra- vy made of Bones, put half a Pound of Butter over it, make a light Pafte, and lay it round the Dilh, roll the Lid half an Inch thick, and

lay

English HO USE -KEEPER. i3>

lay it on.-^Make a Beef Olive Pye the fame Way.

A favory Veal Pye.

Cut a Loin of Veal into Steaks, feafon it Mrith beaten Mace, Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, lay the Meat in your Difli with Sweet Breads feafoned with the Meat, and the Yolks of fix hard Eggs, a Pint of Oyfters, and half a Pint of good Gravy, lay round your Difli a good puff Pafte, half an Inch thick, and cover it with a Lid the lame- thicknefs, bake it in' a quick Oyen an Hour and a quarter j when you take it out of the Oven, cut off the Lid, then cut the Lid in eight or ten Pieces, and ftick it round the Iniide of the Rim, cover the Meat Slices of Lemon, and ferve it up.

To make favory Patties*

Take one Pound pf the Infide of a cold Loin of Veal, or the fame Quantity of cold Fowl, that have been either boiled or roafted, a quarter of a Pound of Beef Suet, chop them as fmall as poflible, with fix or eight Sprigs of Parfley, feafon them well with half a Nutmeg grated fine. Pepper, and Salt, put them in a TolJing Pan, with half a Pint of Veal Gravy, thicken the Gravy with a little Flour and Butter, and two Spoonfuls of Cream, and fiiake them over the Fire two Minutes, and fill your PattieSt

S a You

1 46 Irtie EsiPEkiENcib

You muft make your Patties thus: fi.ali<^ them pf an oval Form, and bake them as for Cuftards, cut fome long nanx)w Bits of Pafte, and bake them oti aDuftitig Box, but not to eo round, they are for Handles, fill your Pat- ties when quite ht)tj with the Meat, then, fet your Handles a-crofs the Patties? they will look like Baikets if you h^^ve nicely pittclicd the Walls of the Pattiies, when you rtiifed them, 5 five will be a Dilh, you may make thetti Vrith Sugar and Currants inft&ad of Parfl^y.

Fried Patties.

Cut half a Pound of a Leg of Veal very fmall, with fix Oyfters, put the Liquor bf the Oyfters to the Cttimb of a Penny Loaf, tAit them together with a little Salt, put it in i Toiling Pan, with a quarter of a Pound of Butter, and keep ftirring it for three or four Minutes over the Fire, then make a good puff Pafte, roll it out, and cut it in little Bits about the Size of a Crown Piece, fpme rounds ^uai«, and three-cornered, put a little of the Meat upon them, and lay a Lid on them, turn up theEd res as you would a Pafty, to keep the Gravy in, fry them in a Panful of HOgs-iardj they are ^ pretty Corner Difli for Dmner oi Supper: Jf you "veant thefti for Garnifti to i Cod's-Head, put in only Oyfters j they ire vcr/ )neity for a Calf 's^Head Hafli,

Sweef

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 141

Sweet Patdes.

Take the Me At df ft boiled Calf *s-Foot, two large Apples, and one Ounce of candied O- rkttgt, chop theito vert fhiall, ffratc half a Ntitirteg, mil them i«rith the Yoll. of an Egg a S ioOnful of thench Brandy, and a quartet of a Pound of Curratits clean waflied aftd^ried, make a good piff Pafte, roll it in difFercnt Shapes, as the fried ones, and lill them the faiiie Way; you may either frv or bake them. They are a pretty Side Dim for Supper.

Common Patties. '

*TAitt the Ridncy Part of a very fat Loin of Vlfe^I, chop the Kidney, Veal, and Fat very ihiall altogether, feafon it -with Mace, Pepper, iiid Salt, to ybur Tafte, raifc little Patties the Siie of a Tea Cap, fill them with your Meat, put thin Lids tm them, bake them very crifp; fire is enough Ibta Side Bifh.

fb tnake tommon fVitteirs.

Tafcfihalf a;^intof Ale, and two Eggs, beat ift as match Flour as will make it rather thicker than a common Pudding, with Nutmeg, an(f Sirgar to yout Tafte, let it ftand three or fotir Minutes to rife, then drop them with a Spoon into a Pan of boiling Lard, fry them a light Brown, drain them on a Sieve, ferve them up

with

I

I, >. The Experience©

w cih Sugar grated over them, and Wine Sauce in a Boat.

To make Apple Fritters.

Pare the largeft baking Apples yon can get, t:?ce out the Cqre with an Apple Scraper, cut t::m in round Slices, and dip them in Batter; 3>: ade as for common Fritters, fry them Crifp, r^/Fve them up with Sugar grated over them, l^iid Wine Sauce in a Boat, ' They are proper for a Side Difti for Supper.

To make German Puffs.

Put half a Pint of good Milk into a Toiling Pan, and dredge in Flour 'till it is thick as hafly Pudding, keep ftirring it over a flow Fire 'tiU it is all of a Lump, then put it in a Marbk Mortar, when it is cold put to it the Yolks of eight Eggs, four Ounces of Sugar, a Spoonful or Rofe Water, grater a little Nutmeg, and the Rind of half a Lemon, beat them together an Hour or more, when it looks light, and bright, drop them into a Pan of boiling Lard, with a Tea Spoon, the Size of a large Nutmeg, they will rife and look like a large yellow Plumb if they are well beat: As you fry them, lay them on a Sieve to drain, grater Sugar round your Difli, and ferve them up vidth Sack for Sauce. It i^ a proper Corner Pith for Dinner or Suppen

n

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 14$

To make Gofers.

Beat three Eggs Well, with three Spoonful

of 'Flour, and a little Salt, then mix them with

a Pint of Milk, and an Ounce of Sugar, half a

Nutmeg grated, beat them well together, then

maJce your Gofer Tongs hot, hib them with

frefli Butter, fill the Bottom part of your Tongs

and clap the Top upon, then turn them, and

when a fine brown on both Sides, put them in

^ JQifh^ and pour white Wine Sauce over them,

five is enough for a Diih, don't lay them one

upon another, it will make them foft, - ^You

may put in Currants if you pleafe.

To make Wafer Pancakes.

Beat four Eggs well, with two Spoonfuls of fin^r Flour, and two of Cream, one Ounce of Loaf Sugar, beat and fifted, half a Nutmeg grated, put a Jittle cold Butter in a clean Cloth, and rub your Pan well with it, pour in your Batter and make it as thin as a Wafer, fry it only on one Side, pnt them on a Diih, and grater Sugar betwixt every Pancake, and fend them hot to the Table.

To make Cream Pancakes.

Take the Yolks of two Eggs, mix them with

s half a Pint of good Cream, two Ounces of

Sugar, rub your Pan with Lard, and fry them

as thin as poflible, grater Sugar over them,

aad ferve theni up hot.

To

L

144 The Ex^ERiii?tq59

To mah Clary P^peakes.

Beat three Eggs, with three SpooaMs of fine Flour, aa4 a Jittk Salt, exceeding we}I, xjiix them with a Pint of MilJi, and put Lai4 into your Pan, when it is hot, pour in ypw Batter as thin as poflible, then lay Ip your Clary Leaves, and pour a little njore Patter thin over thero, fry them a iine Brow«, and fcrve them up.

To inqh Batter Pancakes,

Beat three E igs, with a Pound of Flour, very well, piit to it a Pint of Milk, and a little Salt, fry them in Lard or Bjutter, grate Sugar over theni, cut them in Quarters, and ferve them up.

CHAP. Vh

Obfervatmf on Pqdding;?.

BREAD a»xj Cuftard Puddings require Time, and a moderate Ov^jii, that wiU raife, and not burn them; Batter and Rice Puddings a quick Ov/en, iind always Butter the Pan or Difli before you pour the Pudding inj TBi^hen you boil » Pudding, take great C^rc your Cloth is vpry cleai), dip it jij boiling Wa- fer, and Flour it well, and give ypur Cloth a fhake j if you boil it in a Bafon, Butter it, and

boU

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 145

boil it in Pknty of Water, and turn it often, and don't cover the Pan, when enough take it up into a Bafon, let it ftand a few Minutes to cool, then untie the String, wrap the Cloth round the fiafon, lay your Difli over it, and turn the Pudding out, and take the Bafon and Cloth off very carefully, for very of ten a light Pudding is broken in turning out.

r •

ji Hunting Pudding.

Beat eight "^^^^ and mix them with a Pint of good Cream, and a Pound of Flour, beat them well together, and put to them a Pound of Beef Suet chopped very fine, a Pound of Currants well cleaned, half a Pound of Jar Raiiins ftoned and chopped fmall, a quarter of a Pound of Powdef Sugar, two Ounces of can- died Citron, the fame of candied Orange cut foiall, grate a large' Nutmeg, and mix all well together with half a Gill of Brandj^, put it in a Cloth, and tie it up clofe, it will take four Hours boiling.

?

A boiled Cuftard Pudding.

Bq I x. a Stick or two of Cinnamon, in a Quart of thin Cream, with a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, when it is cold, put in the Yolks of fix Eggs well beat, and mix them together, fet it over a fiow Fire, and ftir it round one Way, 'till it grows pretty thick, but don't let it boil, take it off and let it ftand 'till it be quite cold. Butter a Qoth very well, and dredge it with

T ^ Flour, "

14)5 The E xt e R I E N c e d

Flour, put in your Cuftard, and tie it up very clofe, it will take three quarters of an Ham boiling, when you take it up. put it in a round Bafon to cool a little, then untie the Cloth, and lay the Difh on the Bowl, and tmB itUpfide down; be careful how you takeoff the Cloth, for a very little will break the Pnd^ . ding, grate over it a little Sugar; for Sauce, White Wine thickened with Flour and Butter, put in the Difli.

^ Lemon Pudding.

Blanch and beat eight Ounces of Jordan

Almonds, with Orange Flour Water, add to

¦"' half a Found of cold Butter, the Yolks

1 Eggs, the Juice of a lai^e Lemon, half

ind grated fine, work them in a Marble

r, or Wooden Bafon, 'till they look white

ght, lay a good pufF Pafte pretty thin in

Jttom of a China Difli, and pour in your

ruaamg; it will take half an Hour baking.

A ground Rice Pudding.

Boi L four Ounces of ground Rice, in Water, 'till it be foft, then beat the Yolks of four Eggs, and put to them a Pint of Cream, four Oimces of Sugar, and a quarter of a Pound of Butter, mix them all well together; you may either boil or bake it.

English HOUSE-KEEPER. X47

An Orange Pudding..

- Bo 1 h the Rind of a SeviHe Otange very fof t, beat it ia a Marble Mortar, with the Juice, put to- it two Naples Bifcuics grated very fine, half a Pound of Butter, a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, afid the Yolks of fix Eggs, naix them well together, ki^ a good pujBf Pafte round the Edge of youx Ctuna Diih, bake it in a gentle Oven half an Hour; you may make a Lemon Pudding the fame Way, by putting in a Lemon inftead of the Orange.

Calf s-Foot Pudding. .

Boil a Gang of CalfVFeet, take the Meat from the Bones^ and chop it exceeding fine» put to it the Crumb of a Pennv Loaf, a Pound of Beef Suet ihread very fmalU half a Pint of Cream, eight Eggs, a Pound of Currants well cleaofed, four Ounces of Citron cut fmall^ two Ounces of candied Orange cut like Straws, a large Nutmeg grated, and a large Glafs of Brandy^ mix them all very well together. But- ter your Cloth, and duft it with Flour, tie it clofe up, boil it three Hours; when you take the Pudding up, it is beft to put it in a Bowl that will juft. hold it, and let it ftand a quarter of an Jtlour^ before you turn it out, lay your Difli upon the Top. of the Bafon* and turn it Upfidc down.

T 2 A

1

148 ^ TJie Experienced

^ hoiled Rice Pudding.

Boil a quarter of a Pound of Rice in Wa- ter, 'till it befoft, and put it in a Hair Sieve to drain, beat it in a Marble Mortar, wkh the Yolks of five Eggs, a quarter of a Pound of Butter, die fame of Sugar, grater a fmall Nut-, meg, and the Rind of half a Lemon* work them well together for half an Hour, then put in half a Pound of Currants -well waihed and cleaned, mix them well together, butter your Cloth and tye it up^ boil it an Hour, and ferve it up with White Wine Sauce,

Btead Pudding.

Take the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, and pour on them a Pint of good Milk boiling hot, 'when it is cold, beat it very fine, with two Ounces of Butter, and Sugar to your Palate, grater halt a Nutmeg in it, beat it up with four Eggs, and put them in and beat all together near naif an Hour, tie it in a Cloth and boil it an Hour, you may put in half a Pound of Curants for change, and pour over it White Wine Sauce.

To make a Sippet Podding.

Cut a Penn^ Loaf as thin as poflible, put a layer of Bread in the Bottom of a Pewter Difli, then ftrew over it a layer of Marrow, or Beef Suet, a handful of Currants, then lay a layer of Bread, and fo on ^till you fill your Difh; as

the

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 149

the firft lay, let the Marrow, or Suet, and Ciir- \ rants be at the Top, beat four Eggs and mix them with a Quart of Cream, a quarter of a ' Found of Sugar, and a large Nutmeg grated, pour it on your Difh and bake it in a moderate Oven, when it comes out of the Oven, pour over it Wine Sauce.

yin Apricot Pudding.

Take twelve large Apricots, pare them, and '^ give them a fcald in Water 'till they are foft, then take out the Stones, grater the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, and pour on it a Pint of Cream boiling hot, let it ftand 'till half cold, then add a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, and the Yolks of four Eg^s, rnix all together with a Glafs of Madeira Wine, pour it in a Difli with thin puflF Paile found, bake it half an Hour in a mode- rate Oven.

^ Tranlparent Pudding.

Beat eight Eggs very well, and put them in a Pan, v^th half a Pound of Butter, and the fame weight of Loaf Sugar beat fine, a little grated Nutmeg, fet it on the Fire and keep ftir- ring it 'till it thickens like buttered Eggs, then put it in a Bafon to cool, roll a rich pufF Pafte verv thin, lay it round the Edge of a China Dim, then pour in the Pudding, and bake it in a moderate Oven half an Hour, it will cut light and clear.

It is a pretty Pudding for a Corner for Dinner,

and a Middle for Supper.

I^O The EXPERIENCliD

A VcrmiccHi Puddiog.

Bo I L four Ounces of Vermicelli ict a Pint of new MUk 'till it is foft, with a ftick or two of Cinnamon, then pur in half a Pint of diick Cream, a quarter of a Pound of Butter, a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, and the Yolks of four beaten Eggs. - ^Bafce it in an Earthen Dilh without a Pafte.

A red Sago Pudding.

Take two Ounces of Sago^ boil it in Water with a Stick of Cinnamon 'till it be quite fdh and thick,^ let it Hand 'till quite col(^ in the mean l^ime grate the Crumb of a Halfpenny Loaf, and pour over it a large Glafs or ReA Wine, chop four Ounces of Marrow, and half a Pound of Sugar, and the Yolks of fsur beaten Eggs, beat them all together for a quarter of an Hour, lay a puff Pafte round yourDifli, and fend it to the Oven; when it comes back ftick it over with blanched Al- monds cut the long way, and bits of Citron cut the fame, fend it to Ifable.

»

A boikd Tanfy Pudding.

Grate four Naples Bifcuits, put as much Cream boiling hot as will wet them, beat the Yolks of four Eggs, have ready a few chopped Tanfy Leaves, with as much Spinage as will make it a pretty Green, be careful you don*t

put

Engi/issh house -keeper, ij^

•pot too much Tanfey in, it will make it bitter, imx. all together when the Cream is cold with > little Sugar, and fet it over a ilow Fire 'till it ign>ws thick, then take it ojOT, and when cold put it in a Clothj well buttered -and floweied, tye it up clofe, and let it boil three quarters of an HJcmr, take it -up in a Bafon, 'and let it ftand one quarter, then turn it carefully out, and put White Wine Sauce 'round it.

ji TiflTy Pudding 'w'ltb Almonds.

Blanch four Ounces of Almonds^ and beat them very fine with Rofe Water, flice a French Roll very thin, .pour on a Pint of Gream boil- ing hot, beat four Eggs very well, and mix ^with the Eggs when beaten a little Sugar and grated Nutmeg, a Glafs of Brandy, a little Juice of Tan]^, and the Juice of Spinage to make it Green, put all the Ingredients into a Stew Pan, with a quarter of a ^ Pound of But- ttr, and give it a gentle boil; you may ^ cither boil it OF bake it in a Diih, either with a Cruil or Writing Paper.

A Tanly Pudding of grmnd Rice.

Boil fix Ounces of ground Rice in a Quart of good Milk, 'till it is foft, then put in half a Pound of Butter^ with fix Eggs very well beat, and Sugar and Rcrfe Water to make it palata*- ble, beat fome Spinage in a Mortar, with a few leaves of Tanfy, ique^ceout the Juice through ^ Cloth, and put it in, mix all well together,

cover

JJ2 The Experienced

/cover you Difli with Writing Paper well bm- tered, and pour it in, three: quarters of aa Hour will bake it; when you dilh it up fticic it all over with a Seville or Sweet Orange ia half quarters.

A Sago Pudding another Way.

Boil two Ounces of Sago 'till it is quite thick in Milk, beat fix Efi;gs leaving out three of the Whites, put to it half a Pint of Cream, two Spoonfuls of Sack, Nutmeg and Sugar to your Tafte j put a Pafte round your Diflx.

hittk Citron Puddings.

Take half a Pint of Cream, one Spoonful j •of fine Flour, two Ounces of Sugar, a little I Nutmeg, mix them all well together, with the j Yolks of three Eggs, put it in Tea Cups, and flick in it two Ounces of Citron cut very thin, bake them in a pretty quick Oven, and turn them out upon a China Difh.-^- Five is enough for a Side Dilh.

A baked Tanfy Pudding-

. Grate the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, pour on them a Pint of boiling Milk, with a quar- ter of a Pound of Butter in ity let it ftand ^till almoft cold, then beat five Eggs and put them in with a, quarter of a Pound of Sugar, a large Nutmeg grated, and a Glafs of Brandy, ftir them about and put them in a Toi£ng Pan^

with

Engush house-keeper, 1³

with a$ much Juice of Spinage as will green jtf, aod a little Tanfy chopped finall, ttir it sibput over !t flow Fire 'till it grows thick, but- ter a Sheet of Writing Paper and lay it in the Bottom of a Pewter Difli, pin the Comers of ' the Paper to make it ftand one Inch above the l)ifh to keep the Pudding fronj. fpreadin :> - ^^ let it ftand three quarters of an Hour in the Oven; when baked, put the Difh over it you fend it up in, and turn it out upon it, take off the Paper, ftick it round with a Seville Orange cut in Wlf quarters, ftick one <][uarter in the Middle, and ferve it up with Wine Sauce. It will look as green as if it bad not been baked whei^ turned out.

^ green Codling Pudding,

Green a Quart of Codlins, as for a Pye, mb them through a Hair Sieve with the Back of a Wooden Spoon, and as much of the Juice of Beets as will ^een your Pudding, put in the Cruirib of half a Penny Loaf> half a Pound of Butter, and three Eggs well beaten; beat them all together with half a Pound of Sugar, and two Spoonfuls of Cyder; lay a good Pafte round the Rim of the Di£h, and pour it in.-^ Half an Hour will baJte it.

Tq make a common Rice Pudding.

Wash half a Pound of Rice, put to it three Piuts of good Milk, mix it well with a quarter of a Pound of Butter, a Stick or two of Cina-

U mon

1^4 The Experienced

mon beaten fine, half a Nutmeg grated, one Egg well beat, a little Salt, and Sugar to your Tafte. - One Hour and a half will bake it in a quick Oven; when it comes out take off the Top* and put the Pudding in Breakfail Cups, turn them into a hot Diih like little Puddings, and ferve it up

A Marrow Pudding.

Pour on the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, a Pint of Cream boiling hot, cut a Pound of Beef Mar- row very thin, beat four E^gs very well, then add a Glafs of Brandy, with Sugar and Nut- meg to your Tafte, and mix them all well up together; you may either boil or bake it, three quarters of an Hour will do it, cut two Ounces of Citron very thin, and ftick them all over it when you Diih it up.

Marrow Pudding a ficond way.

Half boil four Ounces of Rice, fhreadhalf a Pound of Marrow very fine, ftone a quarter of a Pound of Raifins, chop them very fmall, with two Ounces of Currants well cleaned, beat four Eggs a quarter of an Hour, mix it all together with a Pint of good Cream, a Spoonful of Brandy, Sugar and Nutmeg to your Tafte; you may either bake it or put in Hogs Skins.

Marrow

English HOUSE-KEEPER, iss

Marrow Pudding a third way,

Blanch halfa Pound of Almonds^ put them jin cold Water all Night, the next Day beat them in a Marble Mortar very fine, with Orange [Flower, or Rofe Water, take the Crumb of a Penny Loaf, and pour on them a Pint of boil- ing Cream, whiltt the Cream is cooling, beat the Yolks of four Eggs and two Whites a quar- ter of an Hour, add a little Sugar, and grate Nutmeg to your Palate, have ready fhread the Marix>w of two Bones, and mix them all well together with a little candied Oran^^e cut fmall, this is ufually made to fill in Skms, but is a good baked Pudding; if you put it in Skins don't fill them too full for it will fwell, but boil them gently.

White Puddings in Skins*

Wash half a Pound of Rice in warm Water, boil it in Milk 'till it is foft, put it in a Sieve to drain, blanch and beat half a Pound of Jordan Almonds very fine, with Rofe Water, wafli and dry a Pound of Currapts, then cut in fmall bits a Pound of Hog's Lard, take fix Eggs and beat them well, half a Pound of Sugar, a lar^e Nutmeg grated, a Stick of Cin- namon, a little Mace, and a little Salt, mix them very well together, fill you Skins and boil them.

U 2 Tq

ts6- The ExPERiEtieiiD

To make a Quaking Padding.

Boil a Quart of Cream, and let it ftand 'till almoft cold, then l)eat four Eggs a full quaner of an Hour, with a Spoonful and a naif of Flour, then mix them with your Cream, add Sugar and Nutmeg to your Palate, tie it clofe up in' a Cloth well buttered, and let it boil aa Hour and turn it carefully out.

To make Yorkfhire Pudding fo hake under

Meat.

* Beat four Eggs with four large Spoonfuls

of fine Flour, and a little Salt, for a quarter of an Hour, put to them one Quan and a half of Milk, mix them well together, then Butter a Dripping Pan and fet it under Beef, Mutton, or a Loin of Veal when roafting, and when it is brown, cut it in fquare Pieces and mm it over when well browned on the under Side, fend it to Table on a Difli. You may mix a boiled Pudding the fame way.

\ A boiled Milk Pudding.

i

f. Pour a Pint of new Milk boiling hot on three Spoonfuls of fine Flour, beat the Flour and Milk for half an Hour, then put in threes, and beat it a little longer, grate in half a 1. Spoonful of Ginger, dip the Cloth in boiling Water, Butter it well, aiid Flour it, put in the Pudding and tie it clofe up, and boil it an Hour}

it

*

«

English HOUSE-KEEPER. I57

it requires great Cate when you turn it out^ pour over it thick melted Butter.

Herb Padding.

Of Spinage, Beets, Parfley, and Leeks, take each a Handful, wafh them, and give them a fcald in boiling Water, then flircad them very fine, have ready a Quart of Groats fteeped in warm Water half an Hour, and a Pound of Hog's Lard cut in littk Bits, three large Onions chopped fffiall, and three Sage Leaves hacked fine, put in a little Salt, mix all Well together, and tie it clofe up j it will require to be taken up in boiling to flacken the String a little.

Goosberry Pudding*

Scald half a Pint of green Goofterries in Water 'till they are foft, put them into a Sieve to drain, wh6n cold, work them through an Hair Sieve with the back of a clean Wooden Spoon, add to them half a Pound of Sugar, and the fame of Butter, four Ounces of Naples Bifcuits, beat fix Eggs very well, and then rnix all together, and beat them a quarter of an Hour, pour it in an Earthen Difli without a Paftc J half an Hour will bake it.

To make Rafpberry Dumplids.

Make a good cold Pafte, roll it a quaftc* cjf an Inch thick, and fpread over it Rafpberry Jam to your own liking, roll it up,, and boil

it

158 The Experienced

it in a Cloth one Hour at leaft, take it Up, and cut it in five Slices, and lay one in the Middle and the other four round it, pour a little good melted Butter in the Difll, and grate fine Su- gar round the Edge of the Di£h. It is proper for a Comer or Side for Dinner,

•» I

To make Damfon Dumplins*

Make a good hot Pafte Cruft, roll it pretty thin, lay it in a bafon, and put in what Quan- tity of Danifons you think proper, wet the Edge of the Pafte, and clofe it up, boil it in a Cloih one Hour, and fend it up whole, pour over it melted butter, and grate fugar round the Edge of the Difli; Note, you make any kind of preferved Fruit the fame Way.

To make Apple Dumplins*

Pahe your Apples, take out the Core with an Apple-fcraper, fill the Hole with Quince, or Orange Marmalade, or Sugar, which fuits you, then take a Piece of cold Pafte, and make a Hole in it, as if you wa& going to make a Pye, lay in your Apple, and put another Piece of Pafte in the fame Form, and clofe it up round the Side of your Apple, it is much bet- ter than gathering it in a Lump at one End, tie it in a Cloth, and boil it three quarters of an Hour, pom: melted Butter over them, and ferve them up, five is enough for a Difh.

To

English HOUSE -KEEPER. 159

m

To make a Sparrow Dumplin.

Mix half a Pint of good Milk, ^ith three Eggs, a little Salt, and as much Flour as will make it a thick Batter, put a Lump of Butter rolled in Pepper and Salt in every Sparrow, mix them in tne Batter, and tie them in a Cloth, boil them one Hour and a half, pour melted Butter over them, and ferve it up.

To make a Barm Dumplin.

Take a Pound of Flour, mix a Spoonful of Barm in it, with a little Salt, and make it into a light Pafte with warm Water, let it lie one Hour, then make it up into round Balls, and tie them up in little Nets, and put them in a Pan of boiling Water, don't Cover them, it will make them fad^ nor don't let them boil fo fail as to let the Water boil over them, turn them

when they have been in fix or fcven Minutes, ' and they will rife through the Nets and look

like Diamonds, twenty Minutes will boU them;

ferve them up and pour fweet Sauce over them.

To make Clary Fritters.

Beat two Eggs exceeding well with one Spoon ful of Cream, one of Ratifia Water, one Ounce of Loaf Sugar, and two Spoonfuls of Flour, grate in half a Nutmeg, have ready waflied and dried Clary Leaves, dip them in the bat- ter and fry them a nice brown j fdhre them

up

f^ The ExpjERiENC^D

up -with Quarters of Seville Oranges laid round them, and good melted Butter in a Boat.

To mah Rafpberry Fritters.



Grate two Naples Bifcuits, pour ov^r them h?iif a Gill of boiling Cream, when it is al» pioft cold, beat the Yolks of four Eggs to ^ ilrong Froth, begit the Bifcuits a little, then beat both together exceeding well, put to it two Ounces of Sugar, and as much Juice erf Rafpberry as will make it a pretty pink Co- lour, and give it a proper fliarpnefs, drop them into a Pan of boiling Lard, the fize of a Wal- nut; when you dim them up, flick Bits of Citron in fome, and blanched Almonds cot length-ways in others; lay round them green and yellow Sweetmeats an.d ferve them upt They are a pretty Corner Difli for either Win-

i>er or Supper.

To make a Taafy Fritter.

Take the Crumb of a Penny Lo^f, pour c^ them half a Pint of boiling milk, let it Hand an Hour, then put in as much Juice of Tan- fy as will give it a flavour, but not to make it bitter, then make it a pretty green with the d Juice of Spin^ge, put to it a Spoonful of Ra- tifia Water or Brandy, fweeten \t to your tafifii grate the Rind of half a Lemon, beat thcj Yolks of four Eggs, mi? them all together, put them in a Tofling Pan with four Ounces gf Butter, fii£ it pver ^ flow Fire 'till it is quite

thick,

English HOUSE-KEEPER. i6t

thick, take it off and let it ftand two or three Hours, then drop them into a Pan full of boil- ing Lard, a Spoonful is enough for a Fritter, ferve them up with Slices or Orange round them, grate Sugar over them, and Wine Sauce in a B(^t.

To make Plumb Fritters with Rice. I

Grate the Crumbs of a Penny Loaf, pour , over them a Pint of boiling Cream, or good ' Milk, let them Hand four or five Hours, then beat it exceeding fine, put to it the Yolks of five Eggs, four Ounces of Sugar, and a Nut- meg grated, beat them well together, and fry them in Hogs Lard, drain them on a Sieve, and ferve them up with White Wine Sauce under them.

N. B. You may put Currants in if you pleiafe.

PART

R T 11.

CHAP. VII.

Obfervaiiofis on making Decoradons for a

Table.

HEN you fpin a Silver Web, or a Defert, always take particular Qtre your Fire is clear, and a Pan of Wa- ter upon the Fire, to keep the Heat from your Face and Stomach, for fear the Heat ihould make you faint; you muft not fpin it before a Kitchen Fire, for me fmaller the Grate is, fo that the Fire be clear and hot, the better able you will be to fit a long Time before it, for if you fpin a whole Defert, you will be fc- veral Hours in fpinning it; be fure to have a Tin Box to put every Bafket in as you fpin them, and cover them from the Air, and keep them warm, until you have done the whole as your Receipt direds you.

If you fpin a Gold Web, take Care jooi Chafing Difli is burnt clear, before you fet it upon the Table where your Mould is, fet your Ladle on the Fire, and keep ftirring it with a Wood Skewer 'till it juft boils, then let it cool a little, for it will not fpin when it is boiling hot, and if it grows cold it is equally as bad, but as it cor^" '^. ^i"*" S'''"" '^f your Ladle, dip

the

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 163

the Point of yout Knife in, an4 J>^gin to fpin found your Mould as long as it will draw, then heat it again; the only Art is to keep it of a proper heat, and it will draw out like a fine Thread, and of a Gold Colour; it is a great Fault to put in too much Sugar at a Time, for often heating takes the Moifture out of the . Sugar, and bums it, therefore the beft Way is to put in a little at a Time, and clean out your Ladle.

When you make a Hen or Bird next, let part of your Jelly be fet in your Bowl, before you put on your Flummery, or Straw, for if your Jelly is warm, they will fettle to the Bot- tom, and mix together.

If it be a Fifh Pond, or a Tranfparent Pud- ding, put in your Jelly at three different Times, to make your Filh or Fruit keep at a proper Diflance, one from another, and be fure yout Jelly is very clear and ftiff, or it will not mew the Figures, nor keep whole; \«^hen you turn them out, dip your Bafon in warm Water, as your Receipt diredts, then turn your Dilh or Salver upon the Top of your Bafon, and turn ' your Bafon upfide down.

When you make Flummery, always obferve to have it pretty thick, and your Moulds wet in cold Water, before you put in your Flum- mery, or your Jelly will fettle to the Bottom, iDd the Cream fwim at the Top, fo that it will look to be two different Colours*

X 2 If

1^4 *nie Experienced

If you make Cuftards, do not let them boil after the Yolks are in, but ftir them all one Way, and keep them of a good Heat 'till they be thick enough, and the rawnefs of the Eggs is gone off.

When you make Whips, or Syllabubs, raife your Froth with a Chocolate Mill, and lay it upon a Sieve to drain, it will be much prettier, and will lie upon your Glafles, without mixing with your Wine, or running down the Sides of your Glailes; and when you have made any of the before-mentioned Things, keep them in a cool, airy Place, for a clofe nace will give them a bad Tafte, and fooji fppil.

To fpin a Silver Web for cornering Sweet- meats.

Take a quarter of a Pound of treble-refined Sugar, in one Lump, and fet it before a mode- rate Fire, on the middle of a Silver. Salver, or Pewter Plate, fet it a little aflant, and when it begins to run like clear Water to the Edge of the Plate or Salver, have ready a Tin Cover, or China Bowl fet on a Stool, with the Mouth downward, clofe to your Sugar, that it may not cool by carrying too far, then take a clean Knife, and take up as much of the Syrup as the Point will hold, and a fine Thread will come from the Point, which you mull draw as quick as poffiblc backwards and forwards, and alio around the Mould, as long as it will ipin from the Knife; be veiy careful you do

not

English HOUSE-KEEPER. i6s

• not drop the Syrup on the Web, if you do, it will fpoil it, then dip your Knife into the Syrup again, and take up more, and fo keep fpinning 'till your Sugar is done, or your Web is thick enough; be fure you do not let the » Knife touch the Lump on the Plate that is not melted, it' will make it brittle, and not fpin at ^ all, if your Sugar is fpent before your Web is; done> put frefli Sugar on a clean Plate or Sal- I ver, and not fpin from the fame Plate again, if you don't want the Web to cover the Sweet-; meats immediately, fet it in a deep Pewter ^ Difli, and cover it with a Tin Cover, and lay a i Cloth over it, to prevent the Air from getting to it, and fet it before the Fire, (it requires to be kept warm, or it will fall) when your Din- ner or Supper is difhed, have ready a Plate or Difli, of the fize of your Web, filled with dif- ferent coloured Sweetmeats, and fet your Web over it.

It is pretty for a Middle, where the Difhes are few, or Comer where the Number is large.-

To Jpin a Gold Web for covering Sweet- meats.

IBeat four Ounces of treble-refined Sugar in a Marble Mortar, and fift.it through a Hair Sieve, then put it in a Silver or Brafs Ladle; but Silver makes the Colour better, fet it over a Chafing-difli of Charcoal, that is burnt clear, and fet it on a Table, and turn a Tin Cover or China Bowl upfide down upon the fame Tabic, and when your Sugar is melted, it will be of

a

i66 The Experienced

a Gold Colour, take your Ladle off the Tire, and begin to fpin it with a Knife, the fame Way as the Silver Web; when the Sugar be- gins to cool and fet, put it over the Fire to warm, and fpin it as before, but don't warm it too often, it will turn the Sugar a bad Colour; if you have not eaough of Sugar, clean the Ladle before you put in more, and Spin it 'till your Web is thick enough, then take it off and fet it over the Sweet-meats, as yoii did the Silver Web.

To make a Defert of Spun Sugar,

Spi N two large Webs, and turn one upon the other to form a Globe, and put in the in- fide of them a few Sprigs Of fmall Flowers and Myrtle, and Spin a little more round ro bind them together, and fet them covered clofe up before the Fire, then Spin two more on a lefler Bowl, and put in a Sprig of Myrtle, and a fevf fmall Flowers, and bind them as before, fet them by, and Spin two more lefs than the laft, and put in a rew Flowers, bind them and fet them by, then Spin twelve Couple on Tea Cups of three different Sizes, in Proportion to the Globes, to reprefent Bafkets, and bind them two and two as the Globes with Spun Sugar; fet the Globes on a Silver Salver, one upon ano- ther, the largeft at the Bottom, and fmalleft at the Top; when you have fixed the Globes, ru-*. two fmall Wires through the Middle of t\: largeft Globes, acrofs each other; then take,   large darning Needle and Silk, and run it thn '

tl:

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 167

the Middle of the krgeft Balkets, crofsitatthc Bottom, aod bring it up to the Top, and make a Loop to hang them on the Wire, and do fo with the reft of yonr Bafkets, hang the largeft Bafketa on the Wires, then put two more Wires a little ihorter acrofs, thro* the Middle of the fecond Globes, and put the Ends of the Wires out betwixc the Baikets, and hang on the four Middle ones, then run two more Wires Ihorter than the laft, thro' the Middle of the Top Globe, and hang the Baskets over the loweft; ftick a Sprig of Myrtle on the Top of your Globes, and fet it on the Middle of the Table. - Obferve you don't put too much Sugar down at a Time for a Silver Web, becaufe the Sugar will lofe its MoiHure and run in Lumps inftead of draw- ing out; nor too much in the Ladle, for the Gold Web will lofe its Colour by Heating too oft. - ^You may make the Baikets a Silver, and the Globes a Gold Colour, if you chufe them. It is a pretty Defert for a grand Table.

To make Calves Foot Jelly-

Put a Gang of Calf's Feet well cleaned into

a Pan, with fix Quarts of Water, and let them

boil gently 'till reduced to two Quarts, then

take out the Feet, fcum off the Fat clean, and

clear your Jelly from the Sediment, beat the

whites of five Eggs to a Froth, then add one

Pint of Lilbon, Madeira, or any pale made

Wine, if you chufe it, then fqueeze in the Juice

of three Lemons; when your Stock is boiling,

take three Spoonfuls of it, and keep flirring it

with

i68 The Experienced

with your Wine and Eggs to keep it from curd- ling, then .add a little more Stock, and ftill keep ftirring it, and then put it in the Pan, and fweeten it with Loaf Sugar to your Tafte, z Glafs of French Brandy will keep the Jelly from turning blue in frofty Air, put in the outer Rind of two Lemons, and let it boil one Minute all together, and pour it into a Flannel Bag, and let it run into a Bafon, and keep pouring it back gently into the Bag 'till it runs clear and bright, then fet your Glaiies under the Bag, and cover it left Duft gets in. - ^If you would have the Jelly for a Fifti Pond, Tranfpa- rent Pudding, or Hen's Neft, to be turned out of the Mould, boil half a Pound of Ifinglafs in a Pint of Water, 'till reduced to one Quarter, and put it into the Stock before its refined^

To make Flummery.

Put one Ounce of bitter, and one of fweet Almonds into a Bafon, pour over them fome boiling Water, to make the Skins come off, which is called Blanching, llrip off the Skins, and throw the Kernels into cold Water, then take them out and beat them in a Marble Mor- tar, with a little Rofe Water to keep them from Oiling, when they are beat, put them into a Pint of Calf's Foot Stock, fet it over the Fire, and fweeten it to your Tafte with Loaf Sugar, as foon as it boils ftrain ic thro' a Piece of Muf- lin or Gawz, when a little cold put it into a Pint ot* tlxick Cream, and keep ftirring it often, 'till it grows thick and cold, wet your

Moidds

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 169

cold -Water, and pour in the Flummery, let it ftaod five or fix Hours at leaft before you turn them out; if you make the Flummery ftiff, and wet the Moulds, it will turn out without patting it into warm Water, for Water takes off the Fifl:ures of the Mould, and makes the Flum* mery look dull.

N. B. Be careful you keep ftirring it 'till cold, or it will run in Lumps when you turn it out of the Mould.

«

To make Colouringy^r Flummery tf/;^ Jellies^

Take Two-penny worth of Cochineal, bruife it with the Blade of a Knife, and put it into half a Tea Cupful of befl: French Brandy, and let it ftand a quarter of an Hour, and filter it ihro* a fine Cloth, and put in as much as will make the Jelly or Fhimmery a fine pink; if yellow, take a little SaiFron and tie it in a Rag, diiifolve it in cold Water; if green, take fomc Spinage, boil it, take off the Froth, and mix it wiih the Jelly; if white, put in fome Cream*

To make a Fiih Pond.

Fi LL four large Filh Moulds with Flummery, and fix fmall ones, take a Qiina Bowl and put in half a Pint of ftiff clear Calf s-Foot Jelly, let it ftand 'till cold, then lay two of the fmall Fifties on the Jelly, the right Side down, put in half a Pint more Jelly, let it ftand 'till cold, ihen lay in the four fmall Fiflies acrofs one

Y another,

70 The Experienced

nother, that when you turn the Bowl, uplide own, the Heads and Tails may be feen, then. Imoft fill your Bowl with Jelly, and let it ftand ill cold, then lay in the Jelly four large Fiflies, nd fill the Bafon quite full with Jelly, and let; t Hand 'till the next Day; when you want to ife it, fet your Bowl to the brim in hot Water j or one Minute, take care that you don't let 1 lie Water go into the Bafon, lay your Plate on tie Top ot the Bafon and turn it upfide down, f you want it for the Middle, turn it out upoa ' . Salver; be fure you make your Jelly very ftiff nd clear*

To make a Hen s Neft.

Take three or five of the fmalleft Puller Eggs j T>u can get, fill them with Flummery, and ^rhen they are ftiflP and cold, peel off the Shells, j are off the Rinds of two Lemons very thin, nd boil them in Sugar and Water to take off he Bitternefs; when they are cold, cut them a long Shreads to imitate Straw, then fill a Bafon ine-third full of ftiff Calf 's-Foot Jelly, and let t ftand 'till cold, then lay in the Shreads of he Letnons, in a Ring about two Inches high ti the Middle of your Bafon, ftrew a few Corns f Sagoe lo look like Barley, fill the Bafon to he height of the Peel, and let it ftand 'till cold, hen lay your Eggs of Flummery in the Mid- lie of the Ring that the Straw may be feen ound, fill the Bafon quite full of Jelly and let t ftand, and turn it out the fame way of the 'ifh Pond.

English HOUSE-KEJEPER. 171 To make Blomange of Ifinglafs.

«

Boil one Ounce of Ifinglafs in a Quart of Water 'till its reduced to a Pint, then put in the Whites of four Eggs, with two Spoonfuls of Rice Water, to keep the Eggs from Poaching,,   and Sugar to your Tafte, and run it thro' a Jelly Bag, then put to it two Ounces of fweet, and one Ounce of bitter Almonds, give, them a Scald in your Jelly, and put them thro' a Hair Sieve, put it in a China Bowl, the next Day turn it out, and ftick it all over with Almonds blanched and cut lengthway: Gamifh with green Leaves or Flowers.

Green Blomange of Ifinglafs.

Dissolve your Ifinglafs, and put to it two Ounces of fweet, and two Ounces of bitter Al- monds, with as much Juice of Spinage as will make it green, and a Spoonful of French Bran- dy, fet it over a Stove Fire 'till it be almoft ready to boil, then ftrain it thro' a Gawz Sieve, when it grows thick put it into a Mellon Mould, and the next Day turn it out: Garnifh it with red and white Flowers.

Clear Blomange.

, Take a Quart of ftrorig Calf's-Foot Jelly, Ikim oflf the Fat and ftrain it, beat the Whites of four Eggs, and put them to your Jelly, fet it over the Fire and keep ftirring it 'till it ooils,

Y 2 then

tjz 'The ExpfeiiEKCED

then pour it into a Jelly Bag, and run it tliro* feveral Tiitoes 'till it is dear, beat one Ounce of fweet Almonds and one of bitter to a Pafle, -with a Spooiifui of Rofc Water foncczed thro' a Cloth, then mix it with yout Jtlly, and thiiee Spoonfuls of very good Cream, fet it over the Fire again/ and keep ftirring it till it is almoft boilings then pour it into aHbwl, and ftir it Very often till it is aimbft cold, then wet: your Moulds and £11 them.

Yellow FInmmcfy.

Take two Chmrcs of Ifinglafei beat it and open it, put it intp a Jtowl, and pour a Pint of boiling Water upon it, cover it up 'till almoil cold, then add a Piqt of White Wine, the Juice of two Lemons with the Rind of one, the YoBcs of eight* Eggs beat well, fwecten it to your Tafte^ put it in a Tofling Pan and keep ftirring. it, when it boils ftrain it thro' a fine Sieve, when almoft cold put k into Cups cc Moulds.

*/# ^ood ' Gr€cn*

Lay an Ounce of Gambouge in ^quarter of a Pint of Water, put an Ounce and a half of good Stone Blue in a little Water, when they are both diflblved, mix them together, add a quarter of a ^int more Water, and a quarter of a Pound of fine Sugar, boil it a little, then put it in a Gally-pot, cover it clofe and it will keep

English HOUSE-KEEFER, 173

for Years; be careful not to make it too deep a green, for a very little will do at a time.

Fruit /;ir Jelly.

Put half a Pint of clear ftiflF Calf 's^oot Jelly iota a Bafon, when it is fet and (lifF, lay ir\ \

^ree fine ript Peaches, apd a Bunch of Grapes Brith the Stalks up, put a few Vine Leaves over diem, then fill up your Bowl with Jelly, and let it {land 'till thjc next Day; thea fet your Ba- fon to the Brim in hot Water, and as foon as you find it leaves the Bafon^ lay your Di(h over it, and turn your Jelly carefully upon it: Gar- iaifh with Flowers.

Green Melon in Flummery.

Make a little ftiff Flummery, with a good leal of hitter Almonds in it, add to it as much )uice of Spinage, as will make it a fine pale green; when it is as thick as good Cream, wet four Melon Mould and put it in, then put a lint of clear Calf 's-Foot Jelly into a large Ba- k, and let them ftand 'till the next Day, then out your Melon, and lay it the right Side )wn in the Middle of your Baibn of Jelly j Jtt fill up your Bafon with Jelly that is begin- ig to fet, let it fiand all Night, and turn it It the feme way as the Fruit in Jelly: Make a jarland of Flowers, and put it in your Jelly, is a pretty Dilh for Middle at Supper, or Cor- ner for a fecond Courfe at Dinner.

Gilded

1 74 The Experienced

*

Gilded Fifti in Jelly.

Make a little cl6ar Blomange as is direfted ^ in the Receipt, then fill two large Fifli Moulds; with it, and when it is cold turn it out, and I gild them with Gold Leaf, or ftrew them over j withGold and Silver ©ian mixed, then lay them on a Soup Difh, and fill it with clear thin Calf s* Foot Jelly, it mull be fo thin as they will fwim in it; if you have no Jelly, Lifbon Wine, or j

any kind of pale made Wines will do.

I

Hen and Chickens in Jelly.

i Make fome Flummery with a deal of fweet

Almonds in it, colour a little of it brown with

Chocolate, and put it in a Mould the Shape of \

a Hen; then Colour fome more FlumnoLery, i

with the Yolk of a hard Egg beat as fine as j

poffible, leave part of your Flummery whice;

then fill the Moulds of feven Chickens, three

with white Flummery, and three with yellow,

and one the Colour of the Hen; when they arc

cold turn them into a deep Difh, put under,

and round them Lemon Peel boiled tender and

cut like Straw, then put a little clear Calf V

Foot Jelly under them, to keep them in their

Places, and let it Hand 'till it is ftifF, then fill"

Tip your Difti with more Jelly. - ^They arc a

pretty Decoration for a grand Table,

Tt

S,

English HOUSE-KEEPER, 175

To make a Tranfparent Pudding.

Make your CalPs-Foot Jelly very ftiflF, and when it is quite fine, put a Gill into a China Bafon, let it ftand *till it is quite fet; blanch a '; few Jordan Almonds, cut them and a few Jar Raifins lengthways, cut a little Citron and can- died Lemon in little thin Slices, ftick them all over the Jelly, and throw in a fewCurrants, then pour^nciore Jelly on 'till it is an Inch higher; when your Jelly is fet, ftick in your Almonds, Raifins, Citron, and candied Lemon, with a* few Currants ftrewed in, then more Jelly as before, then more Almonds, Raifins, Citron, and Lemon in Layers, 'till your Bafon is full; let it ftand all Night, and turn it out the fame Way as the Fifh Pond.

• To make a Dfefart Ifland.

Take a Lump of Pafte, and form it into a Rock three Inches broad at the Top, colour it, and fet it in the Middle of a deep China Difh, and fet a caft Figure on it, with a Crown on its Head, and a Knot of Rock Candy at the Feet; then make a Roll of Pafte aii Inch thick, and ftick it on the inner Edge of the Difti, two Parts round, and cut eight Pieces of candied Eringo Root, about three Inches long, and fix - them upright to the Roll of Pafte on the Edge; make Gravel Walks of Shot Comfits, from the Middle to the Edge of the Dilh, and fet fmall Figures in them, roll out fome Pafte, and cut

it

1 7^ Tlic Experienced

it open like Chinefe Rails, bake it, and fix it on either Side of one of* tlie Gravel Walks, with Glim, have ready a Web of fpun Sugar, Und fet it on the Pillars of Eringo Root, and cut Part of the Web off, to form an Entrance whert the Chinefe Rails are.

It is a pretty Middle Difh for a fecond Courfc at a grand Table, or a Wedding Supper, only fet two crowned Figures on the Mount inftead of one.

m

To tmke a Floating lOand.

Grate the yellow Rind of a large Lemon, into a Quart of Cream, put in a large Glafs di Madeira Wine, make it pretty fweet with Loaf Sugar, mill it with a Chocolate Mill, to a ftrong Froth, take it off as it rifes, and lay it upon a Sieve to drain all Night, then take a deep Glafs Difli, and lay in your Froth, with a Naples Bifcuit in the JVIiddle of it, then beat the White of an Egg to a ftrong Froth, and roll a Sprig of Myrtle in it to imitate Snow, ftick it in the Naples Bifcuit, then lay all over your Froth Giurant Jelly, cut in veiy thin Slices, pour over it very fine ftrong CalPs*Foot Jelly, when it grows thick, lay it all over, 'till it looks like a Glafs, and your Difh is full to the Brim j let it ftand 'till it is quite cold and ftiff, then lay on Rock candied Sweetmeats upon the Top of your Jelly, and Sheep and Swans to pick at the Myrtle, ftick green Sprigs in two or three Places upon the Top of your Jelly, amongft

your

¦M

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 177

your Shapes; it looks very pretty in the Middle of a Table for Supper. - ^You muft not put the Shapes on the Jelly 'till you are going to fend it to the Table.

To make a Floating Ifland a fscond Way,

*

Take Calf 's-Foot Jelly that is fet, brake it a little, but not too much, for it will make it frothy, and prevent it from looking clear, have ready a Middle-fized Turnip, and rub it over with Gum Water, or the White of an Egg, then ftrew it thick over with green Shot Com- fits, and flick in the Top of it a Sprig of Myrtle, or any other pretty green Sprig, then put your broken Jelly round it, fet Sheep, or Swans, upon your Jelly, with either a green Leaf, or a Knot of Apple Pafte under mem, to keep the Jelly from diflblvingj there are Sheep and Swans made for that Purpofe, you . may put in Snakes, or any wild Animals of the fame Sort.

To make the Rocky Ifland.

Make a little ftiflf Flummery, and put it into! five Fifli Moulds, wet them before you put it in, when it is ftiff turn it out, and gild them wit;h Gold Leaf, then take a deep China Difh, fill it near half full of clearGalf's-Foot Jelly, and let it ftand 'till it is fet, then lay on your Fifhes, and a few Slices of Red Currant Jelly, cut very thin round them, then rafp a finall French Roll, and rub it over with the White of an

Z Egg,

178 The Experienced

*

Eeg, and ftrew all over it Silver Bran, and Glitter mixed together, Hick a Sprig of Myrtle in it, and put it into the Middle of your Difli, beat the White of an Egg to a very high Froth, then hang it on your Sprig of Myrtle like Snow, and fill your Dim to the Brim with clear Jelly; when you fend it to Table, put Lamte and Ducks upon your Jelly, with ei- ther green Leaves, or Mofs under them, with their Heads towards the Myrtle.

To make Moonftiine.

Take the Shapes of a Half-moon, and five or feven Stars, wet them, and fill them with Flummery, let them ftand 'till they are cold, then turn them into a deep China Difli, and pour Lemon Cream round them, made thus; Take a Pint of Spring Water, put to it the Juice of three Lemons, and the yellow Rind of one Lemon, the Whites of five Eggs well beaten, and four Ounces of Loaf Sugar, then {tx. it over a flow Fire, and fl:ir it one Way 'till it looks White and thick; if you let it boil it will curdle, then ftrain it through a Hair Sieve, and let it ftand -till it is cold, beat the Yolks of five Eggs, mix them with your Whites, fet them over the Fire, and keep ftirring it 'till it is al- moft ready to boil, then pour it into a Bafon; when it is cold pour it among your Moon and" Stars: Gamifli with Flowers.

It is a proper Difti for a fecond Courfe, either

for Dinner or Supper.

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 179 To make Moon and Scars in Jelly.

Take a deep China Difli, turn the Mould of a Half-moon, and feven Stars, with the bottom Side upward in the Difli, lay a Weight upon every Mould to keep them down, then make fame Flummery, and fill your Difh with it; when it is cold and ftiff, take your Moulds carefully out, and fill the Vacancy with clear Calf 's-Foot Jelly; you may colour your Flum- mery with Cochineal, and Chocolate, to make it look like the Sky, and your Moon and Stars will fhew more clear: Garnifh with Rock Candy Sweetmeats.

It is a pretty Comer Dilh, or a proper Decora^

tion for a grand Table.

To make Eggs and Bacon in Flummery.

Take a Pint of ftifif Flummery, and make Part of it a pretty pink Colour, with the Co- louring for the Flummery, dip a Potting-pot in cold Water, and pour in Red Flummery, the thicknefs of a Crown Piece, then the fame of White Flummery, and another of Red, and twice the thicknefs of White Flummery at the Top; one Layer muil be ftifF and cold before you pour on another, then take five Tea Cups, and put a large Spoonful of White Flummery into each TeaCup, and let them ftand all Night, then turn your Flummery out of your Pottihg- Pots, on the Back of a Plate wet with cold Water, cut your Flummery into thin Slices,

Z 2 and

1 86 The Experienced

and lay them on a China Difh, then turn yairr Flummery out of the Cups on the Difli, and take a Bit out of the Top of every one, and lay in half of a preferved Apricot; it will con- fine the Syrup from difcolouring the Flumf- xnery, and make it like the Yolk of a poached Egg: Gamiih with Flowers. It is a pretty Comer Difli for Dinoen or Side

for Supper*

Solomon? Temple in Flummery.

Make a Quart of ftiJBF Flummery, divide it into three Parts, make one Part a pretty pink Colour, with a little Cochineal bruifed fine, and fteeped in French Brandy, fcrape one Ounce of Chocolate very fine, diflblve it in a little ftrong Coffee, and mix it with another Part of your Fmmmery, to make it a light Stone Colour, the laft Part muft be White, then wet your Temple Mould, and fix it in a Pot to ftand even, then fill the Top of the Temple with Red Flummery to the Steps, and the four Points with White, then fill it up with Choco- late Flummery; let it ftand 'till the next Day, then loofen it round with a Pin, and ihake it loofe very gently, but dpn't dip your Mould m warm Water, it will take ofi* the Glofs, and fpoil the Colour 5 when you turn it out, ftick a fmall Sprig, or a Flower Stalk, down from the Top of every Point, it will ftrengthen them, and make it look pretty^ lay round it Rock Candy Sweatmeats. It is proper for a Comer Difh for a large Table.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 181

To make Cribbage Cards in Flummery.

Fill five fquare Tins the Size of a Card, witli very ftiff Flummery, when you mm them out, have ready a little Cochineal dif- folved in Brandy, and ftrain it through a Muf- lin Rag, then take a Camel's Hair Pencil, and make Hearts and Diamonds with your Cochi- neal, then rub a little Chocolate with a little eating Oil upon a Marble Slab, 'till it is very fine and bright, then make Clubs, and Spades; pour a little Liibon Wine into the Dim, and lend it up.

To make a Di(h of Snow*

Take twelve large Apples, put them in cold

Water, and fet them over a very flow Fire, and

when they are foft, put them upon a Hair Sieve,

take off the Skin, and put the Pulp into a Ba-

lon, then beat the Whites of twelve Eggs to a

very ftrong Froth, beat and fift half a Pound

of double refined Sugar, and ftrew it- into the

Eggs, beat the Pulp of your Apples to a ftrong

Froth, then beat them all together 'till they

are like a ftiff Snow, then lay it upon a China

Difli, and heap it up as high as you can, and

fet round it .green Knots of Pafte, in Imitation

of Chinefe Rails; ftick a Sprig of Myrtle in the

Middle of the Difti, and ferve it up.

It is a pretty Comer Dilh for a large Table.

To

1 82 The Experienced

To make Black Caps*

Take fix large Apples, and cut a Slice of the BlofTum End, put them in a Tin, and fet them in a quick Oven 'till they are brown, then 'wet them with Rofe Water, and grate a little Sugar over rhem, and fet them in the Oven again 'till they look bright, and very black, then take tnem out, and put them into a deep China Diih or Plate, and pour round them thick Cream Cuftard, or White Wine and Sugar.

To make Green Caps.

Take Codlings juft before they are ripc^ green them as you would for Preferving, then rub them over with a little oiled Butter, grate double refined Sugar over them, and fet them in the Oven 'till they look bright, and fparkle like Frofl:, then take them out and put them into a deep China Difh, make a very fine Cuf- tard, and pour it round them; ftiek ficgle Flowers in every Apple, and ferve them up. It is a pretty Corner Difh for either Dinner or

Supper.

To ftew Pears.

Pare the largeft dewing Pears, and fticka Clove in the Bloflbm End, then put them in a well tinned Sauce Pan, with a new Pewter Spoon in the Middle, fill it with hard Water, andifet it over a flow Fire for three or four Hours 'till

your

English HO USE -KEEPER. iS^

your Pears arcfoft, and the Water reduced to a fmall Quantity, then put in as much Loaf Sugar as will make it a thick Syrup, and give the Pears a boil in it, then cut fome Lemon Peel like Straw, and hang them about your Pears, and ferve them up with the Syrup in a deep Dilh.

To make Lemon Syllabubs.

To a Pint of Cream, put a Pound of double refined Sugar, the Juice of .even Lemons, grate the Rinds of two Lemons mto a Pint of White Wine, and half a Pint of Sack, then put them all into a deep Pot, and whilk them for half an Hour, put it into Glafles the Night before you want it; it is better for {landing two or three Days, but it will keep a Week if required.

To make Solid Syllabubs.

Take a Quart of rich Cream, and put in a Pint of White Wine, the Juice of four Lemons, and Sugar to your Tafte, whip it up very well, and take off the Froth as it rifes, put it upon a Hair Sieve, and let it fland 'till the' next Day in a cool place, fill your GlaiTes better than half ftdl with the thin, then put on the Froth, and heap it as high as you can; the Bottom will look clear and keep feveral Days.

Whip Syllabubs.

Take a Pint of thin Cream, rub a Lump of Loaf Sugar on the Out-fide of a Lemon, and

fweeten

184 The Experienced

fweeten it to your Tafte, then put in the Juice of a Lemon » and a Glafs of Madeira Wimei or French Brandy, mill it to a Froth with a Chor colate Mill, and take it off as it rifes, and lay it upon a Hair Sieve, then fill one half of your Poflet GlaiTeSy a little more than half full wkh White Wine, and the other half of your Glaf- fes a little more than half full of Red Wine, then lay on your Froth as high as you can, hut obferve that it is well drained on your Sieve, or it will mix vnth your Wine, and fpoil your Syllabubs.

To make Lemon Syllabubs a fecond PFay^

Put a Pint of Cream to a Pint of White Wine, then rub a quarter of a Poxmd ci Losrf Sugar upon the out Rind of two Lemons, 'till you have got out all the Eflence, then put the Sugar to the Cream, and fqueeze in the Juice of bodi Lemons, let it ftand for two Hours, then mill them with a Chocolate Mill, to raife the Frothy and take it off with a Spoon as it rifes, or it will make it heavy, lay it upon a Hair Sieve tt> drain, then nil your Glafles with the Re- mainder, and lay on the Froth as high as vou can^ let them ftand all Night, and they will be clear at the Bottom; fend them to the Table upon a Salver, with Jellies.

To make a Syllabub under the Cow.

Put a Bottle of ftrong Beer, and a Pint of Cyder into a Punch Bowl, grate in a fmall Nut- meg,

English H0USE-KES:PER. iSj

-meg, and fvi^eteii it to your Tafte, then mi& as much Milk from (he Cow as will make a firoag Froth, vid the AXe look clear, let it ftand .an Hovir, then ilrew aver it a few Currants, "wdll waihed, pioked, and plumped bef (we the Fire, then fend it to the Table.

¦

' . ' I 'll

CHAP. vin. Obfervatians «^/7 • Preferring.

WHEN you make any Kind of JeUv, take Care you don't let any of the Seeds from the Fruit fall into your Jelly, nor fqueeze it too near, for that will preverit your Jelly from being fo clear; pound your Sugar, and let it diilblve in the Syrup before you fet it on the Fire, it makes the Scum rife well, and the Jelly a better Colour: It is a great Fault to boil any Kind of. Jellies too high, it makes them la dark Colour; you muft never keep green Sweetmeats in the firft Synip longer than the Receipt directs, leaft you fpoil their Colour; you muft take the fame Care with the Oranges and Lemons, as to Cherries, Damfons, and moft Sorts of Stone Fruit, put over them either Mutton Suet rendered, or a Board to keep them down, or they will rife out of the Syrup and fpoil the whole Jar, by giving them a four bad Tafte; oT>ferve to keep all wet Sweetmeats in a dry cool Place, for a wet damp Place will fflake them Mould, and a hot Place will dry up the Virtue, and make them Candy; the belt

A a Dire(flion

r

I

r

186 Tlie Experienced

Diredlion I c!an give^ is 10 dip Writing Papa in Brandy, and lay it clofe to your Sweetmexts, tie them well down with white Paper, and two fould of thick Cap Paper to keep out the Air, for nothing can be a greater Fault than bad tyeing down, aiid leaving the Pots open.

To make Orange Jelly,

>

Take half a Pound of Hartlhom Shavings, and two Quarts of Spring Water, let it boil 'till it be reduced ro a Quart, pour it clear off, let it ftand 'till it is cold, then take half a Pint of Spring Water, and the Rinds of three Oranges pared very thin, and the Juice of fix, let theffl ftand all Night, ftrain them through a fine Hair Sieve, melt the Jelly, and pour the O range Liquor to it, fweeten it to yourTaflci with double refined Sugar, put to it a Blade or j two of Mace, four or five Cloves, half a fmall i Nutmeg, and the Rind of a Lemon, beat the Whites of five Eggs to a Froth, mix it very well with your Jelly, fet it oyer a clear Fire, boil it three or four Minutes, run it through your Jelly Bag feveral Times 'till it is dear, and when you pour it in y pur Bag take great

Care you don't make it,

' «

To make Harcfhorn Jelly.

Put two Quarts of Water into a clean Pafli with half a Pound of Hartflxorn Shavings, k' it fimmer 'till near one half is reduced, ftrai it off, then put in the Peel of four Oranges.,

m

English HOUSE-KE EPE R. 187

and two Lemons pared ver)r thin, boil them five Minutes, put to it the Juice of the before- Bientioned Lemons and Oranges, with about ten Ounces of double refined Sugar, beat the Whites of fix Eggs to a Froth, mix them care- fully with your Jelly that you do not poach the Eggs, juft let it boil up, then run it through a Jelly Bag 'till it is clear.

To make Red Currant Jelly.

Gathek your Ciiirants when they are dry and full ripe, ftrip them oflp the Stalks, put them ina large Stew Pot, tie'a Paper over them, and let them ftand . an Hour in a cool Oven, ftrain them through a Cloth, and to cvei^y Quart of Juice add a Pound and a half of Loaf Sugar broken in fmall Lumps, ftir it gently over a clear Fire 'till your Sugar is melted, flcira it well, let it boil pretty quick twenty Minutes, pour it hot into your Pots; if you let it fland it will break the Jelly, it will not fet fo well as when it is hot; put Brandy Papers oyer them, and keep them in*a dry Place for XJfe.

N. B. You may make Jelly of half Red and half White Currams the fame Way.

To make Black Currant Jelly.

Get your Currants when they are ripe and drjr, pick them off the Stalks, and put them tti a large Stew Pot, to every ten Quarts of

A a 2 Cun-ants,

r^ The Expbr.ibn.geid

Currants, pmt a Quart of Water^ tie. a Fap
To^ make Red Ra^beny Jam.

Gathsk your Rafpbeiiies "wliexL lAioy, are npe and dry, pick them very carefully from the StaHis, and dead ones cfuul them in a Bowl widi a Silver or Wooden Spoon, Pewter is apt to turn them a purple Colour; as fooa as you bavie eruCbed tnemv 9aetvt in their o!cm 'Weight of Loaf S)igar, and half their Weight oi Gur- nxLt Juice, baked a^ flrained a« for Jelly, then, i^ them over a ctear ^w Fire, boil them, half ah HoctF, Qam them weii, and keep ftizw ing dieiii all the Tiitne, then but doe.

^ >ers over them, and keep them for Ufe.

ff



N. B. As foon as you have got your Boil mem, aM it will pfefctve their Flavour.

n

Enghsu house-keeper. i9^

«

4

To make White Rafpberry Jam.

Get your Rjifpbemea dry and full ripe, cfuih cbem. fine, and ftrew in tbeij? own Weiglu; of Loaf Sugar, and half their Weight of -the jniix of White Cunants, boil them hajtf aa Hour over a clear flow Fire, Ikijn them well, and put them into Pots or GlafTes, tie them down \irith Bra9i4y Pa >ers, a^d k^p them dry for Ufe.

H. B. ftrew in your Sugar as in the Bed {Ufpberry Jam.

To make Red Strawberry Jam«

Gathjls the fcarlet Strawberries very ripe, bruife them very fine, and put to them a littlfc juice of Strawberries, beat and fif t their Weight in $^gar, ftre\y i( an^ong them, and put them in the Preferving Pan, let them over a clear ibv Fire, ikim them, and boil them twenty Minutes, then piu them in Pqti or GlaJOfes for

To tnakg Green Goosberry Jam«

Take the green Walnut Gooiberries "v^fhcii they are full grown, but not ripe, cut them in two and pick out the Seeds, then put them in a Pan of Water, green them as you do the ^ ^^^ofberries, in Imitation of Hops, and lay them cna a^ieve to drain, then beat them in a Mar- ble

L.

jpo The Experienced

ble Mortar with their Weight in Sugar, then take a Quart of Goofberries, boil them to xnafbL in a Quart of Water, then fqueeze them; and to every Pint of Liquor put a Pound of fine Loaf Sugar, boil and Ikim it, then put in your green Goofberries, boil them 'till they are very diick, clear, and a pretty green, then put tfaexn in Glafles for Ufe.

' To make Black Currant Jiam.

Get your Black Currants when they arc full ripe, pick them clear from the Stalks, and bruife them in a Bowl with a Wooden Mailet, to every two Pounds of Curranrs, put a Pound and a half of Loaf Sugar beat fine, put them into a Preferving Pan, boil them full half an Hour, Ikim it and ftir it all the Time, then put it in the Pots, and keep for Ufe;

7o prcferve Red Currants in Bunches.

Stone your Currants, and tie fix or feven Butiches together with a Tliread to a Piece of fplit Deal, about the length of your Finger, weigh the Currants, and put the Weight of double refined Sugar in your Preferving Pan, with a little Water, and boil it 'till the Sugar flies, then put the Currants in, and juft gIVe them a boil up, and cover them 'till next Day, then take them .out, and either dry them or put them in Giaflfes, with the Syrup boiled up with a little of the Juice of Red Currants; put

Brandy

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 191

Brandy Paper over them, and tie them clofc down with another Paper, and fet them in a dry Place.

To prefirve White Currants in Bunches.

Stone your Currants, and tie them in Bunches as before, and put them in the Pre- ferving Pan, with their Weight of double re- fined Sugar beat and iifted fine, let them fiand all Night, then take fome Pippins, pare, core, and boil them, but don't ftir the Apples, only prefs them down with the Back of your Spoon, when the Water is ftrong of the Apple, add to it the Juice of a Lemon, ftrain it through a Jelly Bag 'till it runs quite clear, to every Pint of your Liquor put a Pound of double refined Sugar, boil it up to a ftrong Jelly, put it to your Currants, and boil them 'till they look clear, cover them in the Prefervine Pan with Paper 'till they are almoft - cold, men put a Bunch of Currants in your Glafles, and fill it up with Jelly J when they are cold, wet Papers in Brandy, and lay over them, tie another on, and fet them in a dry Place.

To preferve Currants for Tarts.

Get your Currants . when they are dry, and pick them, to every Pound and a quarter of Currants, put a Pound of Sugar into a Preferv- ing Pan, with as much Juice of Currants as will diflblve it, when it boils fkim it, and put in your Currants, and boil them 'till they are

clear;

l^Z The ExFfiRIENCED

clear; put them into a Jar, layfiraody

over, tie them dowix,^ and keep them in a dry

Place*

To pTcfiroc •Cucumhers.

Take fmairCucumbers and large ones ^lat "Will cut into quarters, the greenefl and moft iree from Seeds you can get, put them in a ftrong Salt and Water in a ftrait mouth Jar, with a Cabbage Leaf to keep them down, tic a Paper over them, fet them in a warm Plaoe • 'till they are yellow, walh them out, and fet them over the Fire in frefti Water, with a little Salt in, and a frefli Cabbage Leaf over them, cover the Pan very clofe, but take Care they doa^t boil; if they are not a fine green change Toor Water, (and it will help them) and make them hot, and cover them as before; when they are a good green, take them oflF the Fire, let diem ftand 'till they are cold, then cut the large ones in quarters, take out the Seeds and ibft Part, then put them in cold Water, and let them ftand two Days, but change the Water twice each Day to take out the Salt, take a Pound of fingle refined Sugar, and half a Pint of Water, fet it over the Fire; when you have ildmed it clean, put in the Rind of a Lemon, one Ounce of Ginger, with the Out-fide fcraped off; when your Syrup is pretty thick, take it off, and when it is cold, wipe the Cucumbers dry, and put them in, boil the Syrup once in two or three Days for three Weeks, and ftrengthen the Syrup, (if required,) for the

greateft

ENGLtsH HOtfSE-KEEPER. 15³

CTcateft Danger of tbem fpoilin^ is at firft. - Thd syrup is to be quite cold wnen you piit it to your Cucumbers.

To prefirve Grsipe^ tn Brandy.

Take fome dofe Bunches of Grapes, but not too ripe, either red or white, put them into a Jv, with a quarter of a Pound of Sugar Cand]^, ami' fill the Jar with common Brandy, tie it clofe "with a Bladdfer, and' fet them in a dry Place. Morello Cherries are done the fame way.

7(J preferve Kcntifh or Golden Pippins.

Boil the Rind of an Oranee very tender,

then lay it in Water for two or mree Days, take

a Quart of Goldeii Pippins, pare, core, quarter,

and boil riiem to a ttrong Jdly, and run it

through a Jelly Bag, then take twelve Pippins,

pare them and Tcrape out the Cores, put two

Pounds of £oaf Sugar into a Srcw Pan with

near a Pint of Water, when it boils Ikim it,

arid put in your Pippins with the Orange Rind

in thin Slices, let them boil fafl 'till the Sugar

is very thick and will almoft Candy, then put

in a Pint of the Pippin Jelly, bpil them faft 'till

the Jelly is clear, then fq^ueeze in the Juice of

a Lemon, gve it one boil, and put them into

Pots or Glanes with the Orange Peel,

B b to

19.4 The Experienced

ft

«

To preferve Gtctn Codlings that mil keep all

the Year.

Take Codlings about the Size of a Walnu^ with the Stalks and a Leaf or two on, put a handful of Vine Leaves into a Brafs Pan of Spring Water, then a Jay of Cbdlings, then Vine Leaves, do fo 'till the Pan is full, cover it clofe that no Steam can get out, fet it on a flow Fire; when they are foft take off the Skins with a Penknife, then put them in the fame Water with the Vine Leaves; it muft be quite cold or it will be apt to crack them, put in a little Roach Allum, and fet them over a very * flow Fire 'till they are green (which will be in three or four Hours,) then take them out and \ lay them on a Sieve to drain, - ^Make a good Syrup, and give them a gentle boil once a Day I for three Days, then put them in fmall Jars; put Brandy Paper over and keep them for ufe.

To preferve Green Apricots*

Gather your Apricots before their Stones are hard, put them into a Pan of hard Water, with Plenty of Vine Leaves, fet them over a flow Fire 'till they are quite yellow, then take them out and rub them with a Flannel and Salt to take off the Lint, put them into the Pan to the fame Water and Leaves, cover them clofe, fet them a great Diftance from the Fire 'till thev are a fine light green, then take them carefully up, pick all the bad coloured and

broken

English HOUSE-KEEPER, 195

broken ones out, boil the beft gently for two or three Times in a thin Syrup, let them be quite cold every Time; when they look plump and clear, make a Syrup of double refined Sugar, but not too thick, give your Apricots a gentle boil in it, then put them into Pots or Glailes, dip Papers in Brandy, lay it over them, and keep them for ufe, then take all the bro^ ken and bad cdloiired ojies, and boil them in the firft ?yrup for Tarts.

To prefirve Goosberries green.

Take green Walnut Goofeberrles when they

are full grown, and take out the Seeds, * put

them in cold Water, cover them clofe with

Vine Leaves, and fet them over a flow Fire;

when they are hot take them off, and let them

ftand, and when they are cold fet them on

again 'till they are pretty green, then put them

on a Sieve to drain, and have ready a Syrup

made of a Pound of double refined Sugar, and

half a Pint of Spring Water j the Syrup is to

be cold when the Goofberries are put m, and

boil them 'till they are clear, then fet them by

for a Day or two, then give them two or three

fcalds, and then put them into Pots or Glafles

for Ufe.

To preferve Green Goosberries in Imitation

o/'Hops.

Take the largeft green Walnut Goofberries you can get, cut them at the Stalk-end in four

B b 2 quarters.

1^6 Hie Expe&iEMc^D

quarters, leaving them whole at the Bloflbiii- end, then take out ajl the Seeds, and put five or fix one in another, take a Needleful of firoc^g Thread, with a large Knot at the End^ ran chc ^feedle through the Bundh of Gbolberries, and tje a Knot to faften ilhem together, (they ne- femUe Hops,) and put cold Spring Watca- m your Pan, a large Handful of Vine Leaves in the Bottom, and three or fom: lays of Goof- berries, with plenty of Vine Leaves between every lay, and over the Top of your Pan, cover it fo that no Steam can gH out, and fet them on a flow Fire; when they ate fcalding hot take them off, and let them flaod 'till they are cold, then iet them op ^gaip 'till they are sl pod green> then take them off^ and let thenSr :^nd 'till they are quite cold, then put them in a Sieve to drain, make a thin Syrup to every Pint of Water, put in a Pound of common Loaf Sugar, boil and Ikim it well; when it is about half cold, put in your Goofberries, and let them ftand 'till the next Day, then give them one boil a Day for three Days, then make a Syn;p, to every Pint of Water put a Pound of nne Stigar, a Slice of Gipger, and a little Le- mon Peel cut lengthway exceeding thin, boil and Ikim it well, give your Goofberries a boil in it; when they are cold put them into Glafles or Pots, lay Papers dipped in Brandy over them, tie them up, and keep themiQr life.

To

\:Englwh HOUSE-KEETER. 1^7

To prejsrvc Sprigs jgT««.

Gather the Sprigs of Muftard 'when it is

sains; tolSeed, put them in a Pan of S ning

Water, with a great rnajiy Vinoe Leaves under

aad over them, put to them one Ounce of

Roach Allum, fet it over a gentle Fire; when

it is hot, take it off, and let it iland 'till it is

cjuite cold, then cover it very clofe, and hang

it a great height over a flow Fire j when they

are green, tale out the Spiigs, and lay them

on a Sieve to drain, then mal^e a good Syrup,

boil your Sprigs in it once a Pay for three

Days, put them in, and keep jdbem ior IHe^r-

They are very pretty to ftick in the Middle of

a preferved Orange, or gitsniCh a Set of Salvers.

-^You fliiay preferve young Peafe when they

are jaift come into Pod the fame Way.

To prejetv€ Green Gage Plumbs,

Take the ^neil Plumbs you can get juft be- fore they are ripe, put them in a Pan, with a lay of Vine -Leaves at the Bottom of your Pan, then a lay of Plumbs, do fo 'till your Pan is almoft full, tlien fill it with Water, fet ihem on a floyr Fire; when they are hot and their Skins begin to rife, take them o£F, and take the Skins carefully off, put them on a Sieve as you do them, then lay them in the fame Wa- ter, with a lay of Leaves betwixt, as you did at the firft, cover them very clofe fo that no St^am can get out, and hang them a great dif-

tance

ijS The ExpEkiENCED

tance from the Fire 'till they are green, whicli will be five or fix Hours at leaft, then talce them carefully up, lay them on a Ha^r Sieve to drain, make a good Syrup, give them a gentle boil in it twice a Day for two Days, take them out, and put them into a fine clear Syrup;. put Paper dipped in Brandy over them^ and keep them for Ufe,

To preferve ^Walnuts black.

Take the fmall kind of Walnuts, put them in Salt and Water, change the Water every i>ay for nine Days, then put them in a Sieve, let them ftand in the Air until they begin to turn black, then put them into a Jug, and pour boiling Water over them, and let them Hand 'till ihe next Day, then put them in a Sieve to drain, ftick a Clove into each End of your Walnut, put them into a Pan of boiling Wa- ter, let them boil five Minutes, then take them up; make a thin Syrup, fcald them in it three or four Times a Day 'till your Walnuts are black and briglit, then make a thick Syrup with a few Cloves and a little Ginger cut in Slices, fkim it well, put in your Walnuts, boil them five or fix Minutes, and put them in your Jars J wet your Paper with Brandy, lay it over them, and tie them down with Bladders. The firil Year they are a little bitter, but the f^cond Year they will be very good.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 199

To prtfirve Walnuts green.

Take large French Walnuts when they are a little larger than a good Nutmeg, wrap every Walnut in Vine Leaves, tie it round with a String, then put them into a large Quantity of Salt and Water, let them lie in it for three Days, then put them in frefli Salt and Water, and let them lie in that for three Days longer, then take them out, and lay a large Quantity of Vine Leaves in the Bottom of your Pan, then a lay of Walnuts, then Vine Leaves, do fo 'till your Pan is full, but take great Care the Walnuts do not touch one another, fill your Pan with hard Water, with a little Bit of Roach Atlum, fet it over the Fire 'till the Water is very hot, but don't let it boil, take it off, let them ftand in the Water 'till it is quite cold, then fet them over the Fire again; when they are green take the Pan off the Fire, and when the Water is quite.cold take out the Wal- nuts, lay them on a Sieve a good diftance from each other, have ready a thin Syrup boiled and &imed; when it is pretty cool put in your Walnuts, let them ftand all Night, the next Day give them feveral fcalds, but don't let them boil, keep your Preferving Pan clofe co- vered, and when you fee that they look bright, and a pretty Colour, have ready made a rich Syrup of fine Loaf Sugar, with a few Slices of Ginger, and two or three Blades of Mace, fcald your Walnuts in it, put them ip fmall Jars, with Paper dipped in Brandy over them,

tie

tie them dowa with Bladders, and keep tbeta

for Ufe*

Trefirw Walnuts tv^U.

Take the large Preiich Walnuts full grown, bnt not ihelled, pare them 'tiU you fee the white appe^, put them - in Salt and Water as you do them, ha^e ready bbiling a large Sauce Pan full of foft Water, boil them in it £vc. ^Minutes, take them up and lay thein becwixt two Cloths 'till you have made a thin Syrup, boil them gently in it for four or five Minu»s, thefl put them in a Jar, ftop them up clofc that no3team can get out, if it does it will fpoil their Q)lour, the next Day boil them again, when they are cold, make a frefh thick Syrup, with two or three Slices of Ginger and a Blaxlc of Mace, boil and fkim it well, then give your Walnuts a boil in it, and put them in Glaft Jars with Papers dipped in Brandy laid over them, and tie Bladders over them to keep out the Air*

To make Orange Marmalade.

Take the cleared Seville Oranges you can ger, cut rhem in two, then take all tne Pulp and Juice out into a Bafon, pick all the Seeds and Skins out of it, boil the Rinds in hard Wa- fer *till they are tender, (change the Water tvw) or three Times while they are boiling) then pound jjiem in a Marble Mortar, add to it the Juice and Pulp^ and put them in the Prcferving

Pan,

English:HOUSE-KEEPER. 201

Bin, with double its Weight of Loaf Sugar, iet it over a flow Fire, boil it a little more than half, an Hoiir, then put it into Pots with Bran« dy Papers over them<

Tranjparent Marmalade.

¦

TAXE*very pale Seville Oranges, cut them in Quarcers, takeout the Pulp, and put it into a Bafon, pick the Skins and Seeds out, put the Peels in a little Slk and Water, let them Itand all Nigljt, then boi! them in a good Quantity of Spring Water 'till they are tender, then cut them in very thiii Slices, and put them to the Pulp^ to every Pound of Marmalade, put a Pound and a half of double refined Sugar beat fine, boil them together gently for twenty Mi- nutes; if it is not clear and tranfparent, boil it five or fix Minutes longer, keep ftirring it gently all the Tin\e, and take Care you do not break the Slices > when it is cold, nut it into Jelly or Sweetmeat Glafles, tie them down with Brandy Papers over them. They are pretty for a Defert of any Kind.

To make Quince Marmalade.

Get your Quinces when they are full ripe, pare them, and cut them into Quarters, then take out the Core, and put them into a Sauce Pan that is well tinned, cover them with the Parings, fill the Sauce Pah near full of Spring Water, cover it clofe, and let them ftew over a flow Fire 'till they^ are fof t, and of a pink Co-

C c lour,

202 The ExpEiiitfNCfD

lour, then pick cmt alt your Quiches from tM Parings, beat them to a Pulp in a Marble Moci tar, take diehr Weight of fine Loaf Sugar, pai as much Water to it as will di^hre it, boH ai^ fkim it well, then put in your Quinces and boil them gently three quarters of an Hour, keep ftirring it all the Time, or it will ftick to the Pan and bum; when ic is cold, put it into flat I Sweetmeat Pot8» and tie it down with Bnmd^ Paper.

«

To mak^ Apricoc MarsiJ^ade.



: Whkn you preferve your Apricots, w:k otit all the bad ones, and thofe that are too ri^ for keeping, boil them in tlie Syrup 'tiB they,   will mafh, then * beat them in a M«irbl€ Mor- tar to a Pafte, take half their Weight of Loaf j Sugar, and put as much Water to h as wifl ' diftolve it, boil atid &im it well, boil them tiH; they look clear, and the Syrup thick like a ^t \ Jelly, then put it into your E^eetmeat Gla^Si and keep them for Ufe.

To preferve Green Pine Apples.

Get your Pine Apples before they are ripe, and lay them in a ftrong Salt and Water nvc Days, then put a large Handful of Vine Leaves in the Bottoiji of a large Sauce Pan, and put ifl your Pine Apple, fill up your Pan with Vine leaves, then pour on the Salt and Water it vras laid in, cover it up very clofe, and fet it over 4 flow Fire, let it ftand 'till it is in fine light Green*

hare,

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 203

leadiy a thin Sj^mp, made of a C^art of Water, and a Pound oi double refined Sugar, qprlieii it is almaft cold^ put it into a deep jar, iiiod prut in the Fine Apple with the Top on^ let It Hand, a Week, and take Care that it is well fpvered with the Syrup, then boil your Syrup again, «tnd pour it carefully into your Jar, leaft you break the Top of your Pine Apple, and Aa, it iland eight or« ten Weeks, and give the Syrup two cr three boils to keep it from mould- ings let your Syrsp ftand 'cili it is near cold, before you pour i* on j when your Pine Apple looks quite full ^and ^een^ take it out of the ftjrrup, and make a thickSyrup of three Pounds Gf doable refined Sugar, with as much Water as will diffolre it; boQ and ikim it well, put a lew Slices of White Ginger in it, when it is liear cold, pour it upon your Pine Apple, tie it down with a Bladder, and the Pine Apple will keep many Years, and not ihrink, but if you

Snt it into thick Syrup at the firft, it will tirink, fur tht Stren^n of the Synip draws out the Juice, and fpoils it.

N. B. It is a great Fault to put any Kind of Fruit that is prcferved whole mto thick Syrup

fidt

79 J>rejerve Red Goosberries.

To every Quart of ruff Red*Goofberries, put a Pound of Loaf Su^ar, put your Sugar into a Preferving Pan, with a& much Water as will dijSblve it, boil and Ikim it well, then put in

.C c a your

ao4 The ExpERfENCED

your Goofberries, let them boil a litdc, fet them by 'till the next Day, then boil them 'till they look clear, and the Syrup thick, then put them into Pots or GlalTes, cover them ^th Brandy Papers, and kfeep them for Ufe.

To preferve Strawberries whole.

Get the fineft fcarlet Strawberries with dieir Stalks on, before they are too ripe, then lay them feparately on a Chins Difli, beat and fin twice their Weight of double refined Sugar, and ftrew it over them, then take a few ripe fcarlet Strawberries, crufh them, and put them into a Jar, with their Weight of double rdfined Sugar beat fmall, co^er thttn clofe, and kt them {land in a Kettle of boiling Water 'till they are foft, and the Syrup is come out of them, then ftrain them through a MuAin Rag, into a Tolling Pan, boil and ikim it well, when it is cold, put in your whqje Strawberries, and fet them over the Fire 'till they are Milk-warm, then take them off, and let them Hand 'till they are quite cold, then fet them on again, and make them a little hotter, do fo fcveral Times 'till they look clear, but don't let them boil, it will fetch the Stalks off; when the Strawber*- ries are cold, put them into Jelly Glailes, with their Stalks downwards, and fill up yourGlaffes with the Syrup; tie them down with Brandy Papers over them.

They are very pretty amongfi: Jellies, and Creams, and proper for fetting out a Defert of any Kind.

fo

ENGLiiH HOUSE-KEEl>ER. nos

To prefirve White Ralpbcrries lobole.

OxT your Rafpberries when they are turning vrliite^ with the Stalks on about an Inch lon^, lay them iingle on a Diih, beat and fift their Weight of double refined Sugar^ ftrew it over tliem, to every Quart of Ra^berries, take a Quart of white Currant Juice, put to it its l^ight of double refined Sugar, boil and fkim it well, then put in your Rafpberries and give them a fcald, take them off and let them ftand for two Hours, then fet them on again and make them a little hotter, fo do for two or, three Times 'till they look clear, but don't let them boil, it will make the Stalks come off, when they are pretty cool, put them into Jelly Glafles with the Stalks down, and keep them for ufe.

N. B. You maC^i preferve Red Rafpberries the fame Way, only take Red Currant Juice inilead of White*

To preferve Morello Cherries.

Get your Cherries when they are full ripe, take out the Stalks and prick them with a Pm, to every two iPounda of Cherries, put a Pound and a half of Loaf Sugar, beat Part of your Sugar and ftrew it over them, let them ftand all Night, di£[olve the reft of your Sugar in half a Pint ot the Juice of Currants, fet it over a itow Fire, and put in the Cherries with the

Sugar,

^o6 • The £xpi:ri£Ncsje»

Sugar, and give them a gentle fcald, let them Hand all Night again, and give them smother fcald, then take them carenilly out, and boil your Syrup 'till it is thick, then pour ijt upon your Cherries, if you find it he too thiji, boil It again.

To prefirve Barberries in Bunches^

Take the Female Barberries, pick out all the largeft Bunches, then pick the reft from the StaUfis, put them in ap much Watet aa will make a Syrup for your^Buncheg, boil them *till they, are fof t, then ftrain them through v Sieve, to every Pint pf the Juice, put a Pound and a half of Loaf Sugar, boil and fcum it well, and to every Pint of Syrup, pur half a Pound of Barberries in Bunches, w>il them 'till they look very fine and clear-, thta put them cUrefuUy into Pots, orGlalTes; tie Brandy Papers over, and keep them for Ufe,

To prefirve Barberries for Tarts.

Pick the Female Barberries clean from the Stalks, then take their Weight in Loaf Sugar, put them in a Jar, and fee them ia a Kctdc of boiling Water 'till the Sugar is melted, «nd the Barberries quite 'foft, the .next Day put them m a Preferving Pan, ajad boil them fifteen Minutes, then put them ia }ar3, aod keep them in a dry cool Place.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 20V

m ¦ «

Tq preferv€ Damfons.

Take th€ fmali long Daiftfons, pick off the Stalks,* aiid prick tltem with a Pin, then piK

' them into a deep Pot, with half their Weight of Loaf Sugar pounded^ let. them in a mode- rate Oven 'till they are foft, then take them

? out, and give the Synap a boil, and pour it upon then), do fo for two or three Times, then take them carefully out, and put them into the jars you intend to keep them in, and pour crver them rendered Mutton Suet; tie a Bladder over them, and keep them for Ufe, in a very

cool Place.

• . • _

Ti> preferve Magnuin Bonum Plumbs.

Take the large yellow Plumbs, put them in

& PiA full of Spring Water, fet them over a

flow Firc> keep putting them down with a

Spoon -till you find the Skin will come off,

then take them up and peel the Skin off with

a Penknife, pijt them in a fine thin Syrup and

give them, a gentle boil, then take theiti off,

and mm them pretty often in the Syrup, or the

Out-fide will mrn Browij, when tl)ey are auite

cold, fet them over the Tire again, let tncm

boil fiVfe or fix Minutes, then take them ofF and

turn them very often in the Syrup 'till they arc

near cold, then take them out and lay them

feparately on a flat China Difli, llrain the Syrup

through a Muflin Rag, add to it the Weight of

the Plumbs of fine Loaf Sugar, boil and (kim

it

^¦¦W"

208 The Experienced

it very well, then ptit in your Plumbs, boil them 'till they look clear, then put them care- fully into Jars or Glafles, cover them well ^th the Syrup> or they will loofe their Colour, put Brandy Papers and a Bladder over them*

To prejerve Wine Sours«

Take the fineft Wine Sours you can giat^ pick off the Stalks, run them down the Seam .with a Pin only Skin deep, then take half their Weight of Loaf Sugar pounded, and lay it be-

¦' rwixt your Plumbs in Layers 'till your Jars is full, fet them in a Kettle of boiling Water 'till they are fof t, then drain the Syrup from them,

I and give it u boil, and pour it on them^ do fo

I for feveral Times, 'till you fee the Skin look hard and the Plumbs clear, let them Hand a

I Week, then take them out one by one, and put them into Glaifes, Jars, or Pots, give your Syrup a boil, if you -have not Syrup enough, boil a little clarified Sugar with your Sy imp, and fill up your Glafles, Jars, or Pots, with it, and put Brandy Papers over, and tie a Bladder over them to keep out the Air, or they will loofe their Colour and grow a purple.

They are' pretty with either Steeple Cream, any Kind of Flummeries, or under a Silver Web.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER.^ 209

To preferve Apricots.

Pare your Apricots, and thruft out the Stones with a Skewer, to every Pound of Apricots, put a Pound of Loaf Sugar, ftrew Part of it over them, and let them ftand 'till the next Day, then give them a gentle boil three or four different Times, let them go cold betwixt every Time, take them out of the Syrup one by one, the laft Time as you boil them, ikim your Syrup well, boil it *till it looks thick and dear, then pour it over your Apricots, and put Brandy Papers over them.

To preferve Peaches,

Get the lareeft Peaches brfore they are too ripe,, rub off the Lint with a Cloth, then run them down the Seam with a- Pin, Skin deep, cover them with French Brandy, tie a Bladder over them, and let them iland a Week, then take them omt, and make a ilrong Sprup for them, boil and fkim it well, put . m your Peaches, and boil them 'till they look clear, then take them out, and put them into Pots, or Glailes, mix the Syrup with the Brandy, when it is cold, pour it on your Peaches j tie them clofe down with a Bladder, that the Air cannot get in, or the Peaches will turn Black.

D d r«

tio, Tht ExpeK'i i^ciu

To prifirve Quinces i»bok»

Pare your Quinces very thin and «wnd, that they may look like a Screw, then put them into a well tinned Sauce Pan, with a new Pewter Spoon in the Middle olf them, and £11 ypur Sauce Pan with hard Water, aiid lay the Parings o^er your Quinces, to keep thea down, cover your Sauce Pan fo clofe that th« Steam cannot get but, fet them over a flow Fire 'till they are foft, and a fine pink Colom; let them ftand ^till they are cold, and make a cood Syrup of double refined Sugar, boU and Scim it. well, then put in your Quinces, let them boil ten Minutes, take them, ofip^ and let them fl:and two or three Hours, then boil them ^till the Syrup looks thick, and the Quinces clear, then put them in deep Jare, with Brandy Pap^s and Leather over tnem> keep them ia a dry Place for Ufe.



N.B. You may preferve Quinces in Qiartea

the fame Way.

¦ %

To pr^firvi Oranges carved,

-Take the faireft Seville Oranges you can get, cut the Rinds with a Pen-*knife In what FOritt y6u pleafe, draw out the Part of your Feel as you cut them, and put them into Salt and hard Water, let them ftand for three Days, to take out the Bitter, then boil them an Hour in a large Sauce Pan of frefli Water, with Salt

in

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 2u

ia it, but don't cover il^m, it will fooil the Colour, tlieii tajce them out of the Salt ^nd Water, and rx>il tl^em ten Minutes in a thin 3yniipj for four of five Days together, then put rUt^m into a deep Jar, let themftand twoi^onths, and then make ^ thick Syrup, and jiiil give them a boil in it, let them fund 'till the next Day; then put them in your Jar, with Brandy Papers over> tie them down Trith a Bladder, and keep them for Ufe.

N. p» You may preferve whole Oranges with- out carving, the fame Way, only don't let them boil to lopg, and keep them in a venr thin Syrup at firil, or it will make them fhriuK *nd wither.1 - Always obferve to put Salt in the Water for either Oranges preferved, or any Kind of Orange Chips.

To prefirve Oranges in Jelly.

Take Seville Qranges, and
D d 2 fcum

ai2 The ExPfiRIENCED

fcum it very well, l&c it ftand 'till cold, then put in the Oranges and boil them half an. Hour, if they are not quite clear, boil them once a Day for two or three Days, pare, and core fome green Pippins, and boil them 'all the Water is flrong of the Apple, but dpn't ftir the Apples, only put them down in the Water with the back or a Spoon, ftrain the Water through a Jelly Bag 'till quite clear, then to every Pint of Water, put one Pound of double refined Sugar, and the Juice of a Lemon ftrain- ed fine, boiL it up to a llrong Jelly, drain the Oranges out of the Syrup, put them intoGlafs Jars, or Pots the Size or an Orange with the Holes upwards, and pour the Jelly over them, cover them with Brandy Papers, and tie them clofe down with Bladders.

N. B, You may do Lemons the fame Way.

To preferve Lemons.

Cabtv j; or pare your Lemons very thin, and make a round Hole on the Top, the Size of a Shilling, tajce out all the Pulp and Skins, rub them with Salt, and put them in Spring Water as you do them, to prevent them from turn- ing Black, let them lie in for five or fix Days, then boil them in frefli Salt and Water, fifteen Minutes, have ready made a thin Syrup, of a Quart of Water, and a Pound of Loaf Sugar, boil them in it five Minutes, once a Day, for four or five Days) then put them into a large Jar, let them ftand for fix or eight Weeks, and

it

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 213

it iKrill make them look clear and plump, then take them out of that Syrup, or they will mould; make a Syrup of fine Su ;ar, put a$ much Water to it as will diilblve it, boil and Ikim it, then put in your Lemons, and boil them gently 'till they are clear, then put them into a Jar, with Brandy Papers over them; tie them clofe down, and keep them in a dry Place for Ufe.

T'o preferve Oranges wiVi& Marmalade.

Pare your Oranges as thin as you can, then

cut a Hole in the Stalk-end, the Size of a

Six-pence, take out all the Pulp, then put your

Oranges in Salt and Water, boil them z, little

more than an Hour, but don't cover them> it

will turn them a bad Colour, have ready made

a Syrup of a Pound of fine Loaf Sugar, with a

Pint of Water, put in your Oranges, boil them

'till they look clear, then pick out all the Skins

and Pippins out of yoiur Pulp, and cut one of

your Oranges into it, as thin as poflible, and

take its Weight of double refinea Sugar^ boil

it in a clean Toffing Pan over a flow clear Fire,

[tin it looks quite dear and tranfparent, when

it is cold, take your Oranges out and fill them

with your Marmalade, and put on your Top,

and put them in your Syrup again, let them

ftand for two Months, then m^e a Syrup of

double refined Su^ar, with as much Water as

will diflblve it, boil and Ikim it well, then give

your Oranges a boil in it; put Brandy Papers

over.

214 • The EXPERlEKCfD

over, 9nd tie them down with a Bladder, diej irilX keep for feveral Years.

To make Bullace Checfc.

Take your Bullace when they are full ripe, put them into a Pot, and to every C^art
N. B. You may make Sloe Cheefe the iame

Way.

To make Elder Rob.

GATHEft your Elderberries when they arc full ripe, pick them ckan from, the Stalks, put them m large Stew Pot« and tic a Paper over them, put them in a moderate Oven, let them ftand two Hours, then take them out, and put them in a thin coarfe Cloth and fquecze out all the Juice you can get, then put ei^t Quarts into a well-tinned Ck:)pper, fet it over a ilow Fire, let it boil' 'till it be reduced to one Quart, when it grows niear done, keep ftinring it to prevent its burning to the Bottom, then

put

English HOUSE-KEEPER. ai^

put it into Potting Pots, let it ftand two or three Days in the Sun, then dip a Paper in Sweet Oil the Siate of your Pot, and lay it on, tie it down with a Bladder, and beep it in a very dry Place fortlie.

*

T9 make Black Cumnc Rob.

G«T your Currants when they are ripe, pdck, bake, and fqueeze them the fame as you. did •the Elderberries, then put fix Quarts of the Juice into a l«rge Tofling Pao^ boil it over a t flow Fire 'till it is pretty thick, keep ftirring it 'till it is reduced to one Quart, pour it into flat Pots, dry it, and tic it down the fame Way as you did your Elder Rob*

G xjl a P« La^

Qhfirvations on Drying and Candying.

BEFORE you Candy any Sort of Fruit, pre^ fervethem firft, and dry them in a Stove^ or before the Fire, 'till the Syrup is run out of them, then boil your Sugar, Candy height, dip in the Fruity and lay them in Diflies in your Stove 'till dry, then put them in Boxes, ancL keep them in a dry Place.

To malie Apricot Pafte.

Pare and ftone your Apricots, boil them in Water 'till they will mam quite fmall, put a

Pound

1

2i6 The Experienced

Pound of double refined Sugar in yoiirPre- ferving Pan, with as much Water as will dif- folve it, and boil it to Sugar again, take it off the Stove, and put in a Pound of Apricots, let it ftand 'till the Sugar is melted, then make it fcalding hot, but don't let it boil, pour it into China Difhes, or Cups, fet them m a Stove, when they are AiS enough to turn out* put them on Glafs Plates, turn them as you fee Occafion 'till they are dry.

To make Ralpberry Pafte.

Mash a Quart of RafpberrieSf ftrain one half, and put the Juice to the other half, boil them a quarter of an Hour, put to them a Pint of Red Ciu'rant Juice, let them boil all toge- ther 'till your Berries are enough, put a Pound- and a half of double refined Sugar into a clean Pan, with as much Water as will diflfolve it, and boil it to Sugar again, then put in your Berries and Juice, give mem a fcaldf and pour it into GlzSks or Plates, then put them into a Stove to dry, and turn them as you fee Occa- fion.

To make Goosberry Pafte.

Take a Pound of Red Goofberries when they are full grown and turned, but not ripe, cut them in Halves, pick out all the Seeds, have ready a Pint of Ciurant Juice, boil your Goof- berries in it 'till they are tender, put a Pound and a half of double refined Sugar into your

PaUi

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 217

«

Pan, with as much Water as will diflblve it, and boil it to Sugar again, then put all toge- ther and make it fcalding hot, but it muft not boil, pour it into Plates or Glailes the thicknefs you like, then dry it in a Stove.

To make Currant Paftc either Red or White.

Strip your Currants, put a little Juice to them to keep them from burning, boil them well, and rub them through a Hair Sieve, then boil it a quaner of an Hour j to a Pint of Juice; put a Pound and a half of double refined Sugar fifted, fhake in your Sugar, when it is melted, pour it on Plates, dry it as the other Pailes, and turn it into what Form you pleafe.

To make Currant Clear Cake,

Strip and wafli your Currants, to four Quarts of Currants put one Quart of Water, boil them very well, then run it through a Jelly Bag, to a Pint of Jelly put a Pound and a half of double refined Sugar, pounded and fifted through a Hair Sieve, let your Jelly on the Fire, when it has jjifl. boiled up then fhake in the Sugar, ftir it well, then fet it on the Fire again, make it fcalding hot to melt the Sugar, but do not let it boil, then pour it on Clear Cake Glafles or Plates, when it is Jellied before it is Candied, cut it in Rounds or half Rounds, this v^ill not knot } and dry them the fame way as you did the Apricot Pafte.

E e White

ii8 The ExpEiiiEKCED

White Currant Gle!^*Cak«i ztt made the ittAQ Wfiy, but obferve, that as foon as tht Jelly is inade, yoti mtift put the Stigar to it, 6t it will thittge the Colour.

To make Violet Cakes.



Take the fineft Violets you can get, pick off the Leaves, beat thfc Violets finfe in a Mortar, with the Juice of a Lemon, beat and fift twicd theit Weight of double refined Siigii, put jont Sugar and Violets into a Silver Sauce Pan, or Tankard, fet it over a flow Fire, keep ilirrin [ it gently 'till all your Sugar is diflolved, if yoti let it boil it will difcolour your Violets, droo them in China Plates j when you take them (m\ put them in a Box with Paper betwixt every Layer.

To dry Cherries,

Take Morello Cherries, Hone theift, arid to every Pound of Cherries, put a Potitid and a quarter of fine Sugar, beat and fift it over yo«r Cherries, let them ftand all Night, take them out of your Sugar, and to every Paiiftd ol Sugar put two Spoonfuls of Water, boil and fcum it well, then put in your Cherries, kt your Sugar boil over them, the next Morning ftrain them, and to every Pound of the Synip

fmt half a Pound more Sugar, let it boil a ' ittle thicker, then piit in yotlr Cherries, and let them boil gently, the next Day firain theia,

and

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 219

and dry th^m in a Stove, and mm them every Day.

j4 ficond Way to dry Cherries.

m

1

S^oNjB a Pound and a half of Cherries, put iheai in a Preferving^ Pan, with a lictje Water, when . they are fcalding hot, put them in a Sieve, or on a Cloth to dry, then put them in your Pan again, beat and fif t half a Pound of double refined Sugar, 'ftrew it betwixt every lay of Cherrieg, when it is melted, fet them on the Fire, and make them fcalding hot, let Hvem ftand 'till they are cold, do fo twice xnoire, then drain them ^om the Syrup, and lay them feparately to dry, dip them in cold Water, and dry them with a Cloth, fet them in the hot Sun to dry as before, and keep them in a dry Place 'till you want to ufe them.

Tq dry Green Gage Plumbs.

Make a thin Syrup of half a Pound of fingle refined Sugar, fkim it well, flit a Pound of Humbs down, the Seam, and put them in the Syrup, keep them fcalding hot '^ill^they are tender, they muA be well covered with Syrup, or they will lofe their Colour, let them ftaiw all Night, then make a rich Syrup, to a Pound of double refined Sugar, put two Spoonfuls of \ Water, Ikim it well, and boil it almoft to a Candy, when it is cold, drain your Plumbs out of the firft Syrup, and put them in the thick Syrup, he Xurc let the Syrup cover them,

E e a fet

220 The Experienced

fet them on the Fire to fcald 'till they look dear, then put them in a China Bowl, when xh^ej have flood a Week, take them out, and lay them on China Difhes, dry them in a Stov^ turn them once a Day 'till they are dry. - If you would have them green, fcald them with Vine Leaves, the fame Way as the Green Gages are done.

To make Apricot Cakes.

Take a Pound of nice ripe Apricots, fcald them, and as foon as you nnd the Skin will come off, peel them and take out the Stones^ beat them in a Marble Mortar to a Pulp, boil half a Pound of double refined Sugar, with a Spoonful of Water, fkim it exceeding well, then put in the Pulp of your Apricots, let them fimmer a quarter of an Hour over a flow Fire, iflir it foftly all the Time, then pour it into ihallow flat Glafles, turn them out upon Glafs Plates, put them in a Stove, and turn them once a Day 'till they are dry.

To hum Almonds.

Take two Pounds of Loaf Sugar, two Pounds of Almonds, put them in a Stew Pan with a iPint of Water, iet t;hem over a clear Coal Fire, let them boil 'till you hear the Almonds to crack, take them off and ftir them about 'till they are quite dry, then put them in a Wine Sieve and fif t all the Sugar from them, put the Sugar into the Pan again with a little Water,

give

p

English HOUSE-KEEPER, aai

t

give it a -boil, put four Spoonfuls of fcraped Cochineal tp the Sugar to Colour it, put the Almonds into the Pan, Jceep ftirring them over th.e Fire 'till they are quite dry, put them into at Glafe and they will keep twelve Months.

To dry Damlbps.

Get you Damfons when they are full ripe, fpread them on a coarfe Cloth, fet them in a very cool Oven, let them ftand a Day or two, if they are not as dry as a frelh Prune, put them in another cool Oven for a Day or two longer, -till they are pretty dry, then take them oiit, and lay them in a dry Place; they will eat like frefh Plumbs in the Winten

To candy Ginger.

Beat two Pounds of fine Loaf Sugar, put one Pound in a Tolling Pan, with as much Water as will diflblve it, with one Ounce of Race Ginger grated fine, ftir them well toge- ther over a very flow Fire 'till the Sugar begins to boil, then ftir in the other Pound, and keep Ilirring it 'till it grows thick, then take it off the Fire, and drop it in Cakes upon Earthen Diflies, fet them in a warm Place to dry, and they will look White, and be very hard and brittle.

n

222 The j£xP£9I£NC£»

7q make Orange Chips.

. Take t^e beft Seville Oranges, pa.re tfajsxa a-flan,t, a quarter of an Inch broa<}, if you ca© keep the Paring whole, it looks much prettier, when you have pased them all, put them in Salt and Spring Water, for a Day or two, then boil tjhem in ^ laf ge Qua,ntity of Spring Water 'till they jure tender, then drain them t» a Sjeve, Uave rq^dy a thin Syry^^p, made of a Quart of Watef, and a Poujtid of fine Sugsir, iboU t^em (a few at a Time to keep them fipm breaking,) 'till they look cleai;, then pijit them into a Syrup made of fiqe lipaf Sugar, with as much Water a? will diiltjlve it, svia boil them, to a Candy height, when you take them up, lay them on Sieves, and grate double refined Sugar all over them, and put them in a Stove, or by the Fire i;o dry, and keep them in. a dry Place for Ufe.

To dry Currants in Bundles.

When tl^^ Currants are lloned and tied up in Biunches, to ^yery Pound erf Currants, take a PAVnd and a half of Sugar, and to every Pound of Sugar, put half a Pint of Water, bpU the Syrup very veU, lay your Currants in it, fet them on the Fire, and let them jufl; boil, take them oflf, cover it clofe with a Paper, let them ftand 'till the next Day, then make them fcalding hot, let them ftand for two or three Days, with a Paper clofe to them, then lay

them

ENGLisft HOUSE-KEEtER. 22^

them on Earthen Plates, and fift them well over with SuffsO-, piit them in a Stove to dry, the next Daylay tnem on Sieves, but do not turn them 'till the upper Side is dry, theti tarn thetd, and flft the other Sidt tfell with Sugary when they are ^uitt dry, lay thetn bfct^ilt Papers.

To dty Apricots.

Take a Polmd of Apricots, pare atid done thetti, put them in your Toiling Pan, poiind and fift half a Found of double refined Sugai^ ftrew a little atoongft them, and lay the reft over theift, let therti ftand twenty-^four Houf s, turn thetn three or foilr Tiftries in the Syrup, then boil them pretty quick 'till they look clear ^ when they are cold, take them out, and lay them on Glaflbs, put them intb a Stove, and turn them every half Hour, the next Day every Hoiir^ afad after as you fee Occafioft.

Lemon Drops.

Ui p a Ltimp of tftble refined Loaf Sugat in Water, boil it ftiffifh, take it off, tub it with the Back of a Silver Spoon, to the Side of your JPan, then grate in foriie Lethori Peel, boit it lip, and drop it on Paper; if tou want it Red, pUt in a little Cbcjfiineal.

n

224

The Experienced

To dry Peaches.

«

Pare and ftone the largeft Newington Peaches, have ready a Sauce Pan of bcuin^ Water> put in the Peaches, let them boil 'ti they are tender, lay them on a Sieve to drain^ then weigh them, and put them in the . Pan they were boiled in, and cover them with their Weight of Sugar, let them lie two or three Hours, then boil them 'till they are clear, and the Syrup pretty thick, let them ftand aU Night covered clofe, fcald them very well, then take them off to cool, then fet them on again 'till the Peaches are thoroughly hot, do this foi; three Days, lay them on Plates to dry^ and tiirn them evoy Day.

to candy Angelica.

Take it when young, cut it in Lengths, cover it clofe, and boil it 'till it is tender, peel it and put it in again, let it iimmer and Doil *till it is green, then take it up, and dry it with a Cloth, to every Pound of Stalks, put a Pound of Sugar, put your Stalks into an Earthen Pan, beat the Sugar and llrew over them, let it fland two Days, then boil it 'till it is clear and green, put it in a Cullender to drain, boil ^ Pound of Sugar to Sugar again, ftrew it on your Angelica, lay it on Plates to dry, and fet them in the Oven after the Pies are drawn. - , Three Pounds and a half of Sugar is enough to four Pounds of Stalks.

To

English HQUSE-KEjEPER. ²5

To candy Lemon or Otmgt Ped.

Cut your Lemons or Oranges long-ways, and cake out all the Pulp^ and pi^t the Rinds into a pretty ftrong.Salt ap4 hard Water fix D^ys, tnen boil them in a large (^aatipy of Spring Water 'till they are tender^ then ^ake them out and lay them on a Hair Sieve to drain, then make a thin Syrup of fine Loaf Sugar, a Pound to a Quart of Water j put in your Peels and boil them half an Hour, or *till they look clear, Ijiave rejady a thick Syrup madie of fine Loaf Sugar, with as much Water as will dif- folve it, put in your Peels, and boil them over a flow Fire, •^'till you fee the Syrup candy about the Pan aa<^ Peels. thei;x take them x)ut, and gf-atte fine Sugar all-over them, lay them on a Hair Sieve to drain, 9,nd fet theiUi in a Stove, 4)r befcMTc the Fir^ to 4ry, a^d keep them in a dry Place for Ufe.

N.B. Doa'c cover your Sauce Fan when you boil either Lemons (^ Oranges.

Tq M Sug*r, Can(fy height.

Put a Pound of Sugar into a clean Toiling Pan, with half a Pint of Water, fet it over a very clear flow Fire, take off the Scum as it rifes, boil it 'till it looks fine and clear, then take out a little with a Silver Spoon, when it is cold, if it will draw a Thread from your Spoon, it is boiled high enough for any Kind

F f of

226 Tlie Experienced

of Sweet-meat, then boil your Svrup, and when it begins to tandy round the Edge of your Pan, it is Candy height.

N. B. It is a great Fault to put any Kind of Sweet-meats into too thick a Syrup, efpecially at the firft, for it withers your Fruit, and takes off both the Beauty and Flavour.

CHAP. X.

Obfirvations upon Creams, Cuihirds, and

Cheefe-cakes.

WHEN you make any Kind of Creams and Cuftards, take gjeat Care your Tof- fing Pan be V7ell tinned, put a Spoonful of Water in it, to prevent the Crealn from ftick- ing to the Bottom of vour Pan, then beat your Yolks of Eggs, and ftrain out the Treads, and follow the Direftions of your Receipt. - ^As to Cheefe-cakes they fhould not be made long be- fore you back them, particularly Almond or Lemon Cheefe-cakes, for (landing makes them oil and ^ow fad, a moderate Oven bakes them beft, if It is too hot it burns them and takes off the Beauty, and a very flow Oven makes them fad and look black; make your Cheefe- cakes up juft when the Oven is of a proper heat, and they will rife well and be of a pro- per Colour.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 227

To make Piftacho Cream.

Take half, a Pound of Piftacho Nuts, take out the Kernels, beat them in a Mortar with a 3poonful of Brandy, put them into a Toffing Pan, with a Pint of good Cream and the Yolks of rwo Eggs beat fine, ftir it gently over a very flow Jire 'till it grows thick, then put it into a China Soup Plate, when it is cold, ftick.it all over with fxnall Pieces, and ferve it up.

To make Chocolate Cream.

Scrape fine a aaarter of a Pound of thebeft Chcx:olate, put ^^^^ much Water as will dif* folvc it, put it iirt Marble Mortar, beat it half an Hour, put in as much fine Sugar as will fweeten it and a Pint and a halt of Cream, mill it, and as the Froth rifes lay it on a Sieve, put the remainder Part of your Cream in Poflet Olafles, and lay the frothed Cream upon them.

It makes a pretty Mixture upon a Set of Salvers.

To make Spanifh Cream. .

Di ssoL VE in a quarter of a Pint of Rofe Wa- ter, three quarters of an Ounce of Ifinglafscut ftttall,. run it through a Hair Sieve, add to it the Yolks of three Eggs, beat and mixed vriith half a Pint of Cream, two Sorrel Leaves, and Sugar to your Tafte, dip the Dilh in cold Water before you put in the Cream, (hen cut it out

F f 2 with

lit The EitttKii1n*n9

vritti a Jiging Iron, and lay it in Rings round different coloured Sweet-iileats»

To mdke let Cr eaia.

pAttt flxme, and fcald twelye ripe Apricots, beat them fine in a Marble Mortar, put to tbcm fix Oimces of double refined Sugar, a Pint of fcaldiog GreaiUv work it through x HaiF Siere, put it into a Tin that has a clofe Cover, fet it in a Tub of Ice broken fmall, and a large Quantity of Salt put amongft it, when you fee your Cream ^<7w thick round the Edges of your Tin, ftir it, and fet it in again 'till it all grows quite thick, when your Cream is all Froze up, take it out of your Tin, and put it in the Mould you intend it to be turned out of» theii put on the Lid, and have ready another Tub with Ice and Salt in as before, put your Mould in the Middle, and lay your Ice under and o'rer it, let it ftand four or five Hours, dip your Tin in warm Water when you turn it out} if it be Summer, you' mufl not turn it out 'till the Moment you want it; you may ufeany Sort of Fruit if you havfr not Apricots, only obferve to work it fine.

To make Clotted Crcani.



PtJT one Tea iSpoonful of Earning into a Quai-t of good Crfeam, when it comes to a Curd break it very carefully with a Silver Spoon, lay it upon a Sieve to drain a little, put it into a China Soup Plate, pour over it fome good

Cream

ENGLrsH HO USE -.K EEP E R. Z29

Cream, with the Juice of Rafpberries, Dam- fons, or ajxy Jkiiid of TtrvCit to make it a fine pink Colour, fweeten it to your Tafte, and lay round it a few.StraWbeny Leaves.

It it pioper fdr a Middle at Supper, ora Cbr-

ncfr at Dixmer.

To make Harcfhorn Cream.

Take four Ouiicdt of Harcfhoni Shavings, boil th^m in three Pints of Water 'till it is re- duced to half a Pint, run it through a Jelly Bag, put X.Q it a Pint of Cream, let it juft boil up, th6ti put it into Jelly Ol'afles, let it ftand 'tul it is cold, by dipping yoiir Glafies into fcaldiog Water it vrill flip out whole, i^en itick. * them all over S^ith' Slices of Almonds cut lei^th-way; It eats well with White Wine and Sogar^ like Flummery.

«

To make Ribband Cream.

' ' . . .

Take eight' Quarts of new Milk, fet it on tfie Firft, when it is ready to boil put in a Quart of good Cream, earn it, and pour it into a large Bowl, let it ftand all Ni^ht, then take oS the Cream, and lay it on a Sieve to drain, cut it to the Size . of your Gla&s, and lay red, green, or coloured Sweet-meats between every £ayer of Cream,

To

i%o The Experienced

To make Lemon Cream.

• « > » *

Take a Pint A>f Spring Water, the Binds of two Lemons pared very thin, and the Juice erf three, ^ beat the Whites of fix Eggs, very wcU, xnfcc the Whites with the Water and Lemon, put Sugar to your Tafte, then fet it over the Fire, and keep ftirring it 'till it thickens, but don't let it boil, ftrain it through a Cloth, beat the Yolks of fix Eggs, put it ovter the Fire 'till it be quite thick, iJben put it into a Bowl to CQolj and put it in your Glailes^; • .

4 ^

To make Steeple Cream wtib Wine Sours.

* * ' \ • *, 1

Take one Pint of ftrong clear Calf VFoot Jelly, the Yolks of four hard Eggs, pouuded in a Mortar exceeding fine, with the luice of a Seville Orange, and as muclr 'double refij c4 Sugar as will make it fweet, when your Jelly is warm put it in, and keep flij-ring it 'till it is cold and grows as thick as Cream, then put it into Jelly Glaffes, the next Day turn it out into a .Difli with preferved Wine Sours, fl:ick a Sprig of Myrtle in the Top of every Crtam, and ferve it up with Howers round it.

To make Rafpberry Creanu

^beny

JAXU, JLU.U It LlAiUUgil ct XXdli OiCVC tU l.
the Seeds, mix it well with your Cream, put ill as much Loaf Sugar as will make it plea- sant,

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 231

fant, then put it into a Milk Pot to raifc a Froth with a Chocolate Mill, as your Froth rifes take t off with a Spoon, lay it upon a Hair Sieve, SV'ben you have got what Froth you have Oc- t;afion for, put the remainder of your Cream featd a deep Qiina Difli, or Punch Bowl, put your frothed Cream upon it as high as it will lie on, then ftick a light Flower in the Middle and fend it up.

it is proper for a Middle at Supper, or a Cor- ner at Dinner.

Lemon Cream with Peel.

I Boil a Pint of Cream, when it is half cold put in the Yolks of four Eggs, ftir it 'till it is cold, then fet it over the Fire, with four Ounces of Loaf Sugar, a Tea Spoonful of grated Le- teon Peel, ftir them 'till it is pretty hot, take it off the Fire and put it in a Bafon to cool, when it is cold put it in Sweet-meat Glafles, lay Pafte Knots, or Lemon Peel cut like long Straws over the Tops of your Glafles.

It is proper to be put upon a Boitom Salver

amongft Jellies and Whips.

Orange Cream.

Take the Juice of four Seville Oranges, and the Out-rind of one pared exceeding fine, put them into a Toffing Pan with one Pint of Wa- ter, and eight Ounces of Sugar, heat the Whites

a

t^Z The £xps)i$£NC£9

of five Eggs, fet ?t over th€ Fir^, ftiritoQeway 'till it grows thick and White, toio ii thorough it G»ize Sieve^ ftir it 'liU it is <:old, th*n beaf the Yolks of five Eggs exceeding well, put it in your Toffiog jPao with rhe Cr^aro, ftir it Ofw 9L vej7 flow Fire 'till it is ready to boil, piu it ¦ into a Bafon to cool, and ftir it 'tiU it i$ ^iiite cold, then put it into Jelly Olafles: Scnditifl upon a Salver with Whips and Jelli?$.

To make Burnt Cream.

Boil a Pint of Cream with Sugar, and a little Lemon Peel llired fine, then beat the Yolks of fix and the Whites of four Eggs fe- parately, when your Cream i$ cooled, put in g your Eggs, with a Spocmful of Onnge Flowe( Water, and onie of fine Flour, fet it over the Fire, keep ftirring it 'till it is thick, put it int? a Diflx, when it is cold, fift a Charter of a Pound of Sugar all over, bold a hot SalamaH- jdcr over it* 'till it is very Brown, and looks l^ a Glafs Plate put over your Cream.

To make La Pompadour Cream.

Beat the Whites of five Eggs to a ftrong Froth, put them into a Tofiing Pan, with two Spoonfuls of Orange Flower Water, two Ounces of Sugar, ftir it gently for three or four Mi- nutes, then pour it into your Difli, and pour good melted Butter over it, and fend it in hot.

It is ta pretty Comer Difli for a fecond-Courfc

at Dinner.

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 233 To make a Trifle.

Put three latige Mackrooos in the Middle of your Dilli, poiir as much White Wine over ihem as they will Drinks then take a Quart of Cream^ put in as much Sugar as will make it iw^et) rub your Sugar upon the Rind of a Le- mon to fetch out die Efience^ put your Cream into a Pot, mill it to a ftrong Froth, lay as much JFroth upon a Sieve as will fill the Dim you in- tend to put your Trifle in, put the remainder of your Cream into a Toffing Pan, with a Stick of Cinnamon, the Yolks of four Eggs well beat, and Siigar to your Tafte, fet them over a gentle Fire, nir it one Way 'till it is thick, then rtake it oflF the Fire, pour it upon your Mack- roons, when it is cold put on your frothed Cream, lay round it different coloured Sweet- meats, and fmall ihot Comfits in^ and Figures or Flowers.

Almond Cuftards.

Put a Quart of Cream into a Toffing Pan, a Stick of Cinnamon, a Blade or two of Mace^ boil it and fet it to cool, blanch two Ounces of Almonds, beat them fine in a Marf>le Mortar with Rofe Water, if you like a Ratafia Tafte, put in a few Apricot Kernels o^ bitter Almonds, mix them with your Cream, fweeteh it to your Tafte, fet it on a flow Fire, keep ftirring it 'till it is pretty thick, if you let it boil it will Cur- dle, pour it into Cups, &c.

G g To

234 The ExPERi lENCEp

To make'lucmoTi Caftards.

Take a Pint of White Wine, half aPouadof' double refined Sugar, the Juice of two Lemonr, the Out-rind of one pared very thin, the In- ner-rind of one boiled tender and rubbed thxd \ a Sieve, let them boil a good vp^hile, then take out the Peel and a little of the Liquor, fet it to cool, pour the reft into the Difli^you intend for it; beat four Yolks and two Whites of Eggs, mix them with your cool Liquor, ftrain them into your Difli, ftir them well up together, fet it on a flow Fire, or boiling Water to bake as a Cuftard, when it's enough, grate the Rind of a Lemon all over the Top; you may Brown it over with a hot Salamander.- It may be eat ' either hot or cold.

To make Orange Cuftards.

Boil the Rind of half a Seville Orange very tender, beat it in a Marble Mortar 'till it is very fine, put to it one Spoonful of the beft Brandy^ the Juice of a Seville Orange, four Ounces of Loaf Sugar, and the Yolks of four Eggs, beat them all together ten Minutes, then pour in by Degrees a Pint of boiling Cream, keep beat- ing them 'till they are cold, put them in Cuf- tard Cups, and Itt them in an Earthen Difli of hot Water, let them Hand 'till they are fet, then take them out, and ftick preferved Orange on the Top, and ferve them up either hot or cold.

It

English HO USE- KEEPER. 235

, It is a pretty Conner Difli for Dinn^, or a Side

Difli for Supper.

To make a common Cuftard.



, Take a Quart of good Cream, fet it over a flo^v Fire, with a litfle Cinamon, four Ounces of Sugar, when it . has boiled, take it off the Fire, beat the Yolks of eight Eggs, put to them a Spoonful of Orange Flower Water, to prevent the Cream from cracking, ftir them in by Degrees as your Creajn cools, put the Pan over a very flow Fire, ftir them carefully one ¦ Way 'till it is almoft boiling, then put it into Cups, and ferve them up,

m

* • - .

To make a Beeft Cuftard.

Take a Pint of Beeft, fet it over the Fire, with a little Cinamon, of three Bay Leaves, let it be boiling hot, then take it off, and have ready mixed one Spoonful of Flour and a Spoonful of thick Cream, pour your hot Beeft upon it by Degrees, mix it exceeding well to- gether,- and fweeteh it to your Tafte; you may either put it in Crufts or Cups, or bake it.

To make Fairy Butter.

Take the Yolks' of four Eggs boiled hard, a quarter of a Pound of Butter, beat two Ounces of ^ugar in a large Spoonful of Orange Flower Water, beat them all together to a fine Pafte, let it ftand two or three Hours, then rub

G g 2 it

23^ The ExrBRlEHCEB

it through a Cullender upon a Hate; it loolcs very pretty.

To make Almond Cheefe-cakes.

Take four Ounces of Jordan All blanch them and put them into cold Water, beat them with Rofe Water in a Marble Nfottar, or Wood Bowl, with a Wood Peftle, put to it four Ounces of Sugar, and the Ycdks of four Eggs beat fine, woml it in the Mortar or Bowl. 'tulit becomes White and Frothy» make a rich PufF Pafte, which muft be made thus: Take half a Pound of Flour, a quarter of a Pound of Butter, rub a little of the Butter into the Flour, mix it ftifF with a little cold Water, then roll your Pafte ftraighf out, ftrew over a little Flour, and lay over in thin Bits, one Third of your Butter, throw a little mote Fknir over the Butter, do fo for three Times, then put your Pafte in your Tins; fill them and grate 3ugar oyer them, and bake them in a gentle Oven,

7q make Biread Cheefe-cakes. •

Slice a Penny Loaf as thin as pofilible, poor on it a Pint of boiling Cream, let it ftand two Hours, then take eight Eggs, half a Pound of Butter, and a Nutmeg grated, beat them well together, put in half a Pound of Cmrants well .waflied, and dried before the Fire, apd a Spoon- ful of Brandy, or White Wine, and bake them, in raife4 Crufts, or Petty Pans.

To

£Nt;xisH HOUSE-KEEPER. 237

7b make Gcron Cheefe-cakes.

Bo 1 1, a Quait of Cream, beat the Yolks of four Es'ffs, mix them iwith your Cream whea ic is CG^, then fet it dn the Fire, let it boil 'till it Curds* blanch fome Almonds, beat them 'w^ith Orange Flower Water, >ut them into the Cream, with a few Naples BifcUits, and green Citron Ihred fine, fweeten it to your Tafte, and >ake them in Tea Cups.

To make Rice Cheefe-cakcs.

Boil four Ounces of Rice 'till tender, put it upoa a Sieve to drain, put in four Eggs well beaten, half a Pound of Butter, half a Pint of Cream» fix Ounces of Sugar, a Nutmeg grated, and a Glafs of Ratafia. Water, or Brandy: Beat them all together, and bake them in raifed Crufts.

To make Curd Checfe-cakes.

Take half a Pint of good Curds, beat them with four Eggs, three Spoonfuls of rich Cream, half a Nutmeg grat;^d, one Spoonful of Ratafia, Rofe, or Orange Water, put to them a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, half a Pound of Currants well wafhed and dried before the Fire, mix them all well together, and bake it i\\ Petty Pans, with a good Crufi; under them.

To

238 The ExPERiENcin

m

To make Orange Crumpets.

Take a Pint of Cream, and a Pint of new Milk, warm it, and put in a little Runnet, whai it is broke, ftir it gently, lay it on a Cloth to drain all Night, then take the Rinds of three Oranges boiled as for Preferving, in three diiferent Waters, pound them very fine, and mix them with the Curd, and eight Eggs, in a Mortar, a little Nutmeg, Juice of Lemon, or Orange, and Sugar to your Tafte, bake them in Tin Pans rubbed with Butter, when they are bakpd turn them out, and put Sack and Sugar over them. - Some put Slices of prefled Oranges among them.

To make Cheefc-cakes.

%

Set a Quart of new Milk near the Fire, with a Spoonful of Runnet, let the Milk be Blood warm, when it is broke, drain the Curd through a coarfe Cloth, now and then break the Curd gently with your Fingers, rub into the Curd a quarter of a Pound of Butter, a quarter oi a Pound of Sugar, a Nutmeg and two Naples Bifcuits grated, the Yolks of four Eggs^ and the White of one Egg, one Ounce of Almonds well beat, with two Spoonfuls of Rofe Water, and two of Sack, clean fix Ounces of Currants very well, put them into your Curd, and mi^^ them all well together.

English HOUSE-KEEt»ER. 239

«

To make Curd PufFs.

Take two Quarts of Milk, put a little Run* net in it, when it is broke, put it in a courfe Cloth to drain, then rub the Curd through a Hair Sieve, with four Ounces of Butter beat, ten Ounces of Bread, half a Nutmeg, and a Lemon Peel grated, a Spoonful of Wine, and Sugar to your Tafte, rub your Cups with But- ter, and bake them a little more than half an Hour.

To make Egg Chcefe. . •

Beat fix Eggs well, put them into three Gills of new Milk, Sugar, Cinamon, and Le- mon Peel to your Tafte, fet it over the Fire, keep ftirring it, and fqueeze a Quarter of a Lemon in it to turn it to Cheefe, let it run into what Shape you would have it, when it is cold, turn it out, pour ovar it a little Almond Cream, made of Sweet Almonds beat fine, with a little Cream, then put them into a Pint of Cream, let it boil, and ftrain it, put to it the Yolks ol: three Eggs well beat, fet it over the Fire, and make it like a Cuftard.

To make a Loaf Royal.

Take a French Roll, rafp it, cut oflFthe Bot- tom Cruft, and lay it in a Pan, with the Bottom upwards, boil a Pint of Cream, put to it the Yolks of two Eggs, a little Cinamon, Orange

, Flower

I

240 The ExpjsiLiERCE©

Flower Water, and Sugar to your Tafte, wliexi it is cold, pour it upon the Roll, let it ftand in all Night to fteep, then make a veiy good Guf- tard of Cream, a little Sack, Orange Fl
To make Vnnccs Loaf.

Tak? fmall Freach RoUs^ about the Size of mn Egg, cut a fmall round Hole in the Top^ take out all the Crumbs, fill them with Al- mond Cuftard, lay over itCurrant Jelly, in thin Slices, beat the White of an Egg, and double refined Sugar to a Froth, and ice them all over with it i five is a pretty Difh.

To make a Druakch Loaf.

¦

Take a French Roll hot out of the Oen, rafp it, and pour a Pint of Red Wine upon it, and cover it clofe up for half an Hour, boil one Ounce of Mackarony in Water, 'till it is foft, and lay it upon a Sieve to drain, then put the Size of a Walnut of Butter into it, and as much thick Cream as it will take, then fcrape in fix Ounces of Pumafant Cheefe, ihake it about in your Toffing Pan, with the Mackarony 'till it be like . a fine Cuftard, then pour it hoc

upon

English H0USE-KE ^PER. 241

Upon your Loaf; brown it with a Salamander, and ferve it up,.

It is a pretty Di(h for Supper,

To make Sn(M^ .Balls.

m

Pare five large baking Apples, take out the Cores with a Scoope, fill the Holes with Orange or Quince Marmalade, then make a little good hot Fade, and roll your Apfiles in it, and make your Cruft of an equal thicknefs, and put them in a Tin Dripping Pan, bake them in a mode- rate Oven, when you take them out, make ice- ing for them the fame Way as for the Plumb Cstke, and ice them all over with it about, • quarter of an Inch thick, fet them a good Dif- tance from the Fire 'till they are hardened, but take Care you don't let them Brown, put one in the Middle of a China Difli, and the other five round it: Garnilh them with green Sprigs and fmall Flowers.

They are proper for m Corner, for either Dinner

^ or Supper,

To make Fryed Toaft.

Cut a Slice of Bread about half an Inch thick, fteep it in rich Cream, with Sugar and Nutmeg to your Tafte, when it is quite foft, put a good Lump of Butter into a Tofling Pan, fty it a fine Brown, lay it on a Difh, and pour Wine Sauce over it, and ferve it up.

H h, CHAP.

Z4Z The ExpssiEncsD

G fl A P« AJ.,

Ohfervatlons upon Cakes.

WHEN you make any Kind of Cakes, be fure ^h»t y<\u get yoiir Things ready before you begin, then beat your B^es ^pell, and don't leave them 'till you have finithed the Cakes, or elfe thoir will p back a^n, and your Cakes will not be light; if your Cakes are to have Butter in, take Care you beat ic to a ^ne Croftpo. before you put in your STugar, for if you beat it twice the Time, it will not anfwer ip well: As to Plumbrcake, Seed-cake, or Rice* cake, it is heft to bake them in Wood Garth^ for. if you bsJce them in eitte: Pot or Tin, they bum the Out-fide q£ the Cakes, and confine them fo that the Heat cannot penetrate intathe Middle of your Cake, and prevents it ihxim. rifr^ ingi bake all Kinds of Cake in a good Oven, according to the Size of your Cake, and follotw the Dire<5tions of your Receipt, for though Care hath been taken to Weigh and Meafure every Article belonging to every Kind of Cake, yet the Management and the Oven muft be left: to the Maker's Care.

7b make ft Bride Cake.

Take four Pounds of fiqe Flour wdl dri^, four Pounds of freflj. Butter, fvo Pounds of LQaf Suffar, pound and lift fine a quarter qf an Ounce of Mace, the fame of Nutmegs, to every

Pound

English HOUSE -KElPER. ^43

Pound of Flour put eiffht Eggs, wafh four Pounds of Currents, pick them -#ell and dry tliein before the Fire, blanch a Pound of Sweet Almonds (and cut them kngth-way teiy thin) a Pound of Citron, one Pound of cindied O- TAnge, the fame of candied Lemon, half a Pint of Brandy; firft vrork the Butter with your Hand to a Cream, then beat in your Sugar a quartet of an Hour, beat the Whites of yotir ^ggs to a very ftrong Frdth, mix them with yofur Sugar and Butter, beat your Yolks half an Hour at leaft, and mix tliem virith your Cake, then put in your Flour, Mace, and Nut*- meg, keep beating it well 'till yout Oven is ready, put in your Brandy, and beat your Cur- rants and Almonds lightly in, tie. three Sheets of Paper round the Bottom' of your Hofp to keep • it ^from running out, rub it well with Butter, put in your Cake, and lay your Sweet- meats in three Lays, with Cake betwixt every Lay, after it- is rifcn aiid coloured, cover it with Paper before ybur Oven is Hopped up; it will take three Hours baking.

To MUke Allmdnd Iceing^r the Bride C?ike.

Beat the Whites of three Eggs to a ftrong Froth, beat a Pound of Jordan Almondis very fine with Rofe Water, mise your Almonds with the Eggs lightly together, a Pound of common Loaf Sugar beat firte, and put in by Degrees, when your Cake is ettough, take it out and lay your Iceing on, and put it in- to Brown.

H h 2 To

I

844 The Experienced .

To make Sugar Iceing for the Bride Cake/

Beat two Pounds of double refined Sug^ar^ with two Ounces of fine Starch, fift it through a Gawze Sieve, then beat the Whites of five Eggs with a Knife upon a Pewter Difh half an Hour, beat in your Sugar a little at a Time, or it will makie the Eggs fall, and will not be fo good a Ccdour, when you have put in all

Jrour Sugar, beat it half an Hour longer, then a^ it on your Almond Iceing, and fpread it even with a Knife; if it be put on as foon as the Cake comes out of the Oven, it will be hard by that Time the Cake is cold.

%

f To. make a good Plumb Cake.



Take a Pound and a half of fine Hour well dried, a Pound and a half of Butter, three quarters of a Pound of Currants wafiied and well picked, florie half « Pound of Raifins, and flice them, eighteen Ounces of Sugar beat and fifted, fourteen Eggs, leave out the Whites of half of them, fhread the Peel of a large Lemon exceeding fine, three Ounces of can- died Orange, the fame iof Lemon, a Tea Spoon- ful of beaten Mace, half a Nutmeg grated, a Tea Cupful of Brandy, or White Wine, four Spoonfuls of Orange Flower Water; firfl work the Butter with your Hand to a Cream, then beat your Sugar well in, Whiik your Eggs for half an Hour, then mix them with your Sugar ftnd Butter, and put in your Flour and Spices,

when

English HOUSE-KEEPER. ^4^

v^lien your Oven is ready, mix your Brandy, Fruit, and Sweetmeats lightly in, then put it in your Hoop, and fend it to the Ovenj it will reqiiire ttro Hours and a half baking. - ^It will take an Hour and a half beating.

To make a rich Seed Cake.

Take a Pound of Flour well dried, a Pound

of Butter, a Pound of Loaf Sugar beat and

fifted, eight Eggs, two Ounces of Carriway

Se6ds, one Nutmeg grated, and its Weight of

Cinnamon; firft beat your Butter to a Cream,

then put in your Sugar, beat the Whites of

your Eggs half an Hour, mix them with your

Sugar and Butter, then beat the Yolks half an

Hour, put it to the Whites, beat in your Flour,

Spices, and Seeds, a little before it goes to the

Oven, put it in the Hoop and bake it two

Hours in a quick Oven, and let it ftand two

Hours, - It wnl take two Hours beating.

To make a White Plumb Cake.

To two Pounds of Flour well dried, take a

tound of Sugar beat and fifted, one Pound of

Butter, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace, the

fame of Nutmegs, fixteen Eggs, two Pounds

and a half of Currants, picked and waflied,

half a Pound of candied Lemon, the fame of

Sweet Almonds, half a Pint of Sack or Brandy,

three Spoonfuls of Orange Flower Water, beat

your Butter to a Cream, put in your Sugar,

beat the Whites of your Eggs half an Hour,

mix

\

24^ The Experienced

mix them with your Sugar and Butter, thcji beat your Yolks half an Hour, mii them with your Whites, it will take two Hours beating put in your Flour a little before your Oven is ready, mix your Currants and all your otha Ingredients lightly in, juft when you put it in your Hoop.- Two Hours will bake it. •

TV male little Plumb Cakes.

Tare a Potmd of Flour, rub into k half a Pdiind of Butler, the fame of Sugar, a Uttl^ beaten Mace, beat four ^^gB vttj well, (ieavt out half the Whites) with three Spoonfuls of Yeafl:,. put to it a quarter of a Pint of warm Gream, ftrain thera into your Flour, and make it up light, fet it before tht Fire to rife, juft before you fend it to die Oven, put inr three quarters of a Pound of Currants.

Tfi make Orange Cafecff.

Take Seville Oranges that have very good Rinds, quarter them, and boil them in two ot three Waters untill they are tender, and the Biccemefs is gone off, fcum them, then lay them on a clean Napkin to dry, take all tfa€ Seeds and Skins out of the Pulp with a Knife, Ihread the Peels fine, put tliem to the Ptilp, weigh t^hem, and put ra-ther more than their Weight of fine Sugar into a Toiling Pan, with juft as much Water as will diifolve it, IxhI it 'till it becomes a perfect Sugar, then by degrees put in your Orange Peels and Pulp, ftir them

well

J

English HOUSE-KEElPER. 1147

vrell before you fet them on the Fire, boil it ?ery gently 'till it looks clear and thick, then put it into Flat-bottomed Glaffes, fet them in a Stove, and keep a conftant moderate Heat to them, when they are candied on the Top, turn them out upon Glafles.

N. B. You may make Lemon Cakes the fame

Way.

To make Rice. Cake.

Take fifteen Eegs, leave out one half of the Whites, beat them exceeding well near an Hour with a Whilk, then beat the Yolks half in Hour, put to your Yolks ten Ounces of Loaf Sugar fifted fine, beat it well in,, then put in half a Pound of . Rice Fk)ur, a little Orange Water or Brandy, the Rinds of two Lemons grated, then put in your Whites, beat them all well together for a quarter of an Hour, then put them in a Hoop, and fet them in a quick Oven for half an Hour.

To make Ratafia Cakes.

Tak£ half a Poimd of Sweet Almonds, the &mc Quantity of Bitter, blanch, and beat them fine in Orange, Rofe, or Clear Water, to keep them £rc»n Ouing, pound and fift a Poimd , of nne Sugar, mix it with your Alitionds, have ready very well beat the Whites of four Eggs, mix them lightly with the Almonds and Sugar, put it in a Preserving Pan, and fet it aver a

moderate

248 The Experience©

moderate Fire, keep ftirring it quick one Way until it is pretty hot, when it is a little cool, roll it in fmall Rolls and cut it in thin Cakesj dip your Hands in Flour and fhake them on it, give them each a light Tap with your Finger, put them on Sugar Papers, and lift a little fine Sugar over them juft as you are putting them into a flow Oven.

To make Ratafia Cakes a ficond fFay.

Take one Pound and a half of Sweet Al- monds, and half a Pound of Bitter Almonds, beat them as fine as poflible with the Whites of two Eggs, then beat the Whites of five Eggs to a llrong Froth, Ihake in lightly two Pounds and a half of fine Loaf Sugar beat and fifrod very fine* drop them in little Drops the Size of a Nutmeg, on Cap Paper, and bake them in a flack Oven.

To make Shrewsbury Cakes.

Take half a Pound of Butter, beat it to a Cream, then put in half a Pound of Flour, one Egg, fix Ounces of Loaf Sugar beat and fifted, hatf an Ounce of Cairaway Seeds mixed into a Pafte, roll them thin, and cut them* round with a fmall Glafs, or little Tins, prick them, and lay them on Sheets of Tin, and bake them in a flow Oven.

19

\

^^^^

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 249 To Make a Shrewsbury Cake a fecond Way.

To a Pound of Butter, beat and fift a Pound of double refined Sugar, a little Mace, and four Egffs, beat them all together with your Hand 'till it is very light and looks curdling, then fhake in a Pound and a half of fine Flour, , roll it thin j and cut it into little Cakes with a , Tin, and bake them.

To make Bath Cakes.

Rub half a Pound of Butter into a Pound 0:f Flour, and one Spoonful of good Barm, warm fome Cream, and make it into a light Palle, fet it to the Fire to rife, when you make them up, take four Ounces of Carraway Comfits, work Part of them in, and flrew the reft on the Top, make them into round Cakes the Size of a French Roll, bake them on Sheet Tins, and fend them in hot for Breg-kfaft.

. Tb fnake Queen Cakes.

Take a Pound of Loaf Sugar, beat and fift . it, a Pound of Flour well dried, a Pound of Butter, eight Eggs, half a Pound of Currants waflied and picked, grate a Nutmeg, the fame Quantity of Mace and Cinnamon, work your Butter . to a Cream, then put in your Sugar, beat • the Whites of your Eggs: near half an Hour, mix them with your Sugar and Butter, then beat your Yolks hear half an Hour, and put

I i ' them

a^o The E X ip k R I "E N c £ d

them to your Butter, beat them exceeding veU togetlier, then put in ycfar'Plour, Spaces, and fiie Currants, when it is ready for the Oven, bake them in Tinfe, arid dull a litfle'&ugar dver them.

To nta^e a comhton ^cd'Cdce.

Take two Pounds '6i FlbilP, 'rub into it 1^ ia Pound of Powder Sugir, ohc Ounce 6f Gar- raway Seeds beaten, have teady -a^Pint of Afilk, with half a Pound of Butter melted in it, and two Spoonfuls of new Barm^ make it up into a Pafte, fet it to the Fire to rife, Flour your Tin, and b^e it in ia qiiick Oven.

To 'make Ocam Calces.

^eat the Whites of niiie Eggs to a ftif froth, thien flir it gently -wiih a Spofen, ^fcrir fear the Froth fhouRi fall, (and grate in -the Rinds of two Lihlons, to eviery White of aA Egg, ihake in foftly a Spoonful ttf'doilMe'ife- fined Sugar fifted fine, lay a wet Sheet of Paper on a Tin, and drop the Froth in little Lumps on it with a Spoon, a fmall Diftance fnom each other, and fift a good Quantity 6f Sugitfover them, fet them in an Oven after brown fe*ea3, tndke the Oven clofe up, and theTit)th -wifi rife, when, they a?e jxift cdlouifeil they ate baked enough, take thehi
ENGnSBt HO.XJSi- KEEPER. ^51

jW^ai/ betwixt th^m h^fysc you cloiie the Sot- Qm& togeth/ei; tcx diy..

7o make a Cake 'without Butiai,

Beat eight ]^eg4 l^f^nl^our, have ready- pounded and £^d a Pound of Loaf Sugar, jwtak^ it i9, and beat it half an Hour qiore, pxit to It a quarter of a Pound of Sweet At- laojidft iie^t fine, with Orange flower Water, gr9,t
Sut to it three quarters of a Pound of warm ry fine FJowi t^ YOW Hopp with Butter, an Hour and a half will bake it.

To male Lighc Wigs.

r

Tq thwe quarters of a Pound of fine Flour, put half a Pint of Milk made warm, mix it in t« o or diree Spoonfuls of light Sarm, cover it up, fet it half an Hour by the Eire to rife, w'ctt'k in ^ Pafts:&>ur punces of Sugar, and foax Ounces of Butter, make it into Wigs with as little Flour ae poflible, and a few Seeds, fet » them ia a quick Qven to bake.

To make Mackroons.

To one Pound of blanched and beaten Sweet Almonds, put one Pound of Sugar, and a little Roiie Wawr, to keep theqa from Oiling, then

I i 2 beat

ft.

a^a The Experienced

beat tlic Whites of feven Eggs to a Froth, put them in, and beat them well together, drop them on Wafer Paper, grate Sugar over them, and bake therii. ' . '- ' '

To make Spaniih Bifcuits.

• • • «

Beat the Yolks of eight Eggs near half aa Hcnir, then beat in eight Spoonfuls of Sugar, .beat the Whites to a ftrong Ffoth, then beat them very well with your Yolks and Sugar near half an Hour, put in four Spoonfuls of Flour, and a little Lemon cut exceeding fine, ^nd bake them on Papers.

To make Spunge Bifcuits.

Beat the Yolks of twelve Eggs half an Hour, put in a Pound and a half of Sugar beat and fifted, Whifk it well up 'till you fee it rife in Bubbles, beat the Whites to a flronff Froth, Whifk them well with your Sugar and Yolks, beat in fourteen Ounces of Flour, with die Rinds of two Lemons grated, bake them id Tin Moulds buttered, or Coffins; they require an hot Oven, the Mouth muft not be ftoppefl, when you put them into the Oven, duft tnem with Sugar; they will .take half an Hour baking.

To make Lemon Bifcuits.

Beat very, well the Yolks of ten Eggs, and the Whites of five, -with four Spoonfuls of

pran^

ENGL'isitf HOUSE -KEEPER, isi

Orange Flower Water, 'till they Froth up, then put in a Pound of Loif Siigar^ lifted, beat it , one Way for half an Hour or more, put in half a Pound of Floiir, with the Raljpings of two Lemons, and the Pulp of a fmall one, Butter your Tin, and bake it in a quick Oven^ 1>ut don't ftop up the Mouth at firft for fear it fliould fcorch, auft it with Sugar before you put it in the Overi j it is foon baked.

To make Drop Bifcuits'.

Beat the Yolks of ten Eggs,, and" the Whites of fix, with one Spoonful ot Rofe Water, half an Hour, then put in ten Ounces of Loaf Sugar beat and fifted, Whifk them well for half an Hour, then add one Ounce of Carra- Viray Seeds crufhed a little, and fix Ounces of fine Flour, Whilk in your Flour gently, drop them on Wafer Papers, and bake them in a

moderate Oven.

»

To make common Bifcuits,

Beat eight Eggs half an Hour, put in a Pound of Sugar beat and fifted, with the Rind of a Lemon grated, Whilk it an Hour -till it looks lightj then put in a Pound of Flour, with a little Rofe Water, and bake them in Tins, or on Papers, with Sugar over them.

To

354 '^^ £.xPE] rqHC99

Tq mah WafcrSk

TA.KS twa Spooijfulg of Cre^o?^ tw«5 of Sugar; the fame oi Flour» aiu} ooc^ %ooi^ 0^ Orange flower Watei;, beat them vc^ kh gether ror half an Hoiur, thc^ ma^ y^m Wafer. Tong$ hot, and potur si Uttie of jm Batter in tp cover your Ifons, b«ke ihfm Qb 9 Stove Fire, as they are baked roll them round a Stick like a Spiggar^, as. foon as they are cold, they will be very crifp j they are proper fqff Tea> or^ IP put upoo « SaI^v xq eat mh JfelUea,

To maki Lemoa Pu£^«

Be AT a Pound of double re&oed ^ugiif, $ft it through a fine Sieve, put it in a Bowl, -viith the Juice of two Lemons, beat them weU tor gethcr, then beat the White of an ^gg » l very high Froth, put it in your Bowl, beat it half an Hour, then put in three Eggs, with two Rinds of Lemons grated, mix it well up, duft your Papers with Sugar, drop o^ th§ Puffi In fmall Drops, ^d bake them in « roo4er^ Oven.

7tf make Chocolace Pu£&.

Beat and fift half a Poimd of double refined Sugar, fcrape into it one Ounce of Chocolate very fine, mix them together, beat the WhiK

of an Egg to a very high Froth, then ftrew in

your

-English HOUSE- RE'S PER. z^s

your Sugar and Chocolate, keep' beating it 'till it is as ftifF as a Pafte, Sugar your Papers, and drop diem on aboiut the Size of a Six^^pence, «tid 'blike them ia a very "jOow Oven>

*Fo make Almond PufFs.

IBTLA'WtfH two Ounces of S^Xiieet Almonds, ^eat thfem^fine with Omnge Tlower W ter, beat the Whites cJf ihrfee^ggsto a very high^Froth, •then -flr^w in a little flf ted Sugar, mk your Al- monds wiih ycJur Sugar and Eggs, then add more Sugar 'till it is as 'ftiff as a P&fte, ky it in Gakes, aiid bake it on Paper, ^in a eocfl Oven*

To tneike French Bread,

tTAKE a quarter of aTeck of Flour, one Ounce of Butter melted in, Milk and Water, mix two or three Spoonfuls df Barm with it, drain it through a Sieve, beat the White of an Egg, put it in your Water with a little Salt, work it up to a light Pafte, put it into a Bowl, theh'pull'it Irtto Pieces, let it«ftand all flight, then work it well Up again, cover it and lay it on aDrelfer for half an Hour, then woik ill the Pkees feparate, and mike them in Rolls, and ftt them ihtfothe^ Oven.

C;H A P.

2^6 The . ExPE Ri iTNGEih r

CHAP. XIL

Little SAVORY D I S H E&

7o rag POO Pigs Feet and Eslts.

BOIL your Feet and Ears, then fplityour Feet down the Middle, and cut the Ean in narrow Slices, dip them in Batter, and fry them a good Brown, put a little Beef Gravy k a Toffing Pan, with a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a large one of Mufliroom Catchup, the fame of Browning, and a little Salt, thicken it with a Lump of Butter rolled in Flour, and put in your Feet and Ears, give them a gentle Doil, then lay your Feet in the Middle of your Difh, and the Ears round them, flrain your 'Gravy and pour it over: Garnifli with curled Parfley.

It is a pretty Corner Difli for Dinner.

To make a Solomon-gundy,

Take the white Part of a roafted Chicken, the Yolks of four boiled Eggs, and the Whites of the fame, two Pickled Herrings, and a Handful of Parfley, chop them feparately ex- cdiSding fmall, take the farne Quantity of lean boiled Ham fcraped fine, turn a China Bafofl Upfide down in the Middle of a Difti, make a quarter of a Pound of Butter in the ShApe of a Pine Apple, and fet it on the Bafon Bottom, lay round your Bafon a Ring of Ihread ^Parfley,

then

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 257

*

then a Ring of Yolks of Eggs, then Whites, then Ham, then Chicken, then Herring, 'till you have covered your Bafon and ufed all the Ingredients, lay the Bones of the pickled Her- rings upon it with the Tails up to the Butter, and the Heads lie on the Edge of the Difli i lay a few Capers, and three or four pickled Oyfters round your Dilh, and fend it up.

Solomon-gundy a fecond Way.

C#op all the Ingredients as for the firft, mix them well together, and put in the Middle of your Difli a large Seville Orange, and your In- gredients round it, rub a little cold Butter through a Sieve, and it will curl, lay it in Lumps on the Meat; flick a Sprig of ciurled Parfley on your Butter, and ferve it up.

To roaft a Calf's -Heart.

Mak£ a Force-meat with the Crumbs of half a Penny Loaf, a quarter of a Pound of Beef Suet Inread fmali, or Butter, chop a little Parfley, Sweet Marjoram, and Lemon Peel, mix it up with a little-Nutmeg, Pepper, Salt, and the Yolk of an Egg, fill your Heart, and lay over the Stuffing a Caul of Veal, or Writing Paper, to keep it in the Heart, lay it in a Dutch Oven, ke6p turning it and roaft it tho- roughly; when you diih it up, pour over it good melted Butter, and lay jSlices of Lemon round it, and fend it to Table.

K k To

158 The Experienced

To drefi a Dijh ^ Lambs Bits.

Skin the StOiies and fplit them, lay thexxr oh a dry Cloth with the Sweet Breads and Liver, and dredge them well with Flour, and fry them in boiling Lard, or Butter, a light Brown, then lay them on a Skvse to drain, fry a good Quantity of Parfley, lay your Bits on the Difli, and the Parfley in Lumps over it, pour melted Butter roimd them.

To fricafey CalfVFcec.

« •

BotL your Feet, take out the Bones, and tMt the Meat in thin Slices, and put it in to a Tofling Pan, with half a Pint of good Gravy, boil them a little, and then put in a few Mo- rels, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a little Mufliroom Powder, or pickled Mufhrooms, the Yolks of four Eggs boiled hard, arid a little Salt, thicken with a little Butter rolled in Flour, mix the Yolk of an Egg with a Tea Cupful of good Cream, and half a Nutmeg grated, put it in, and fliake it over the Fire, but don't let it boil, it will curdle the Milk: Gamifli with Lemon, and curled Parfley.

Chickens in Savory Jelly.

Roast two Chickens, then boil a Gang of Calf 's-Feet to a ftrong Jelly, take out the Feet, fkim off the Fat, beat the Whites of three Eggs very well, then mix them with half a

Pint

« ~

Engli SH HOUSE-KEEPER. 259

int of White Wine Vinegar, the Juice of [three Lemons> a Blade or two of Mace, a few ^epper Corns, and a little Salt, put them to ^your Jelly, when it has boiled five or fix Mi- LUtes, run it through a Jelly Bag feveral Times /till it is very clear, then put a little in the ^^Bottom of a Bowl that will hold your Chickens, when they are cold, and the Jelly quite fet, lay them in with their Breafts down, then fill up your Bowl quite full with the reft of your Jelly, which you muft take Care to keep from fettin^, (fo that when you pour it into your Bowl, it will not break,) let it ftand all Night, the next Day put your Bafon into warm Water, pretty near the Top; as foon as you find it loofe in the Bafon, ^y your Difh over it, and turn it out upon it.

Pigeons in Savory Jelly.

Roast your Pigeons with the Head and Feet on, put a Sprig of Myrtle in their Bills, make a Jelly for them the fame Way as for the Chickens, pour a little into a Bafon, when it is fet lay in your Pigeons with their Breafts. down, nil up your Bowl' with your Jelly, and turn it out as before.

Small Birds in Savory Jelly,

Take eight fmall Birds with their Heads and Feet on, put a good Lump of Butter in them, and few up their Vents^ put them in a Jug, cover it clofe with a Cloth, fet them in a • ¦

K k 2 Kettle

26o The Experienced

Kettle of boiling Water 'till they are enough, drain them, make your Jelly as before, xniti little into a Bafon, when it is fet lay in three Birds with their Breafts down, cover them with the Jelly^ when it is fet put in the other £ve with the Heads in the Middle, fill up your Bowl with Jelly as before, and turn it out the iame Way.

Smelts /« Savpry Jelly*

Gut and wafli your Smelts, feafon them with Mace and §alt, lay them in a Pot, with Butter over them, tie them down with a Paper, and bake them half an Hour, take them out, and when they are a little cool, lay them fe- perately on a Board to drain, when they are quite cold, lay them oa a deep Plate in what Form you pleafe, pour cold Jelly over them, and they will look like live Fifli. - ^Make your Jelly as before.



Craw Fifti h Savory Jelly.

Boil your Craw Fifli, then put a little Jelly in a Bowl, made as for the Chickens, when it is fet, put in a few Craw Fifh, then cover them with Jelly, when it is cold, piu in more in Lays 'till your Bowl is full, let it ftand all Night, and furn them out the fame as Chickens.

«

rn

English HOUSE-KEEPER. a6i

7d dre/s Macaroni with Permafent Chcefe.

Bo I L four Ounces of M^icaroni 'till it be quite tender, and lay it on a Sieve to drain, then put it in a Ibffing Pap, with about a Gill of good Cream, a Lump of Butter rolled ia Flour, boil it five Minutes, pour it on a Plate, lay all over it Perrtiafent Cheefe toafted j fend it to the Table on a Water Plate, for it foon goes cold.

Tojiew Chpefe wfib Light Wigs.

Cut a Plate full of Cheefe, pour on it a Glafs of Red Winfc, flew it before the Fire, toaft a Light Wig, pour over it two or three Spoonfuls of hot Red Wine, put it in the Mid- die of your Diih, lay the Cheefe over it, and ferve it up.

To flew Cheefe.

Cut your Cheefe very thin, lay it in aToafter, fet it before the Fire, pour a Glafs of Ale over it, let it Hand 'till it is all like a light Cuftard, then pour it on Toafts or Wigs, and fend it in hot.

To flew Chardoons.

Take the Infide of your Chardoons, wafli them well, boil them in Salt and Water, put them into a Toi$ng Pan with a little Veal Gra- vy,

\

«,

I

26z The Experienced

vy, a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a laigc one of Mumroom Catchup, Pepper and Salt to your Tafte, thicken it with Flour and Butter, boil it a little and ferve it up in a Soup Plate.

To fry Chardoons*

Boi L your Chardoons as you did for ftewiag.

then dip them in Batter made of a Spoonfm

' of Flour and Ale, fry them in a Pan of boiling

Lard, pour melted Butter over them, and fenc

them up,

¦ _

To raggoo Celery.

# ¦

Take off all the Outfides.of your Heads of Celery, cut them in Pieces, put them in a Tof- fing Pan, with a little Veal Gravy or Water, boil them 'till they are tender, put to it a Tea Spoonful of Lemon Pickle, a Meat Spoonful of White Wine, and ia little Salt; thicken it with Flour and Butter, and ferve the^l up with Sippets.

To fry Celery.

Bo I L your Celery as for a kaggoo, then cut it and dip it in Batrqr, fry it a light Brown ia Hog's-lard; put it on a Plate, and pour melted Butter upon it.

To ftew Celery.

Take, off the Outiide and the green Ends of your Heads of Celery, boil them in Water 'till

English HOUSE-KEtPER. 263



they are very tender, put in a Slice of Lemon, a little beaten Maca^ thicken it with a good Lump of Butter and Flour, boil it a little, beat the Yolks of two Eggs, grate in half a Nutmegs mix them with a Tea Cupful of good Cream, put it to your Gravy, (hake it over the Fire 'till It be of a fine thicknefs, but do not let it boil; ferve it up hot.

To fcollop Potatoes.

Boil your Potatoes, then beat them fine in a Bowl with good Cream, a Lump of Butter and Salt, put them into fcollop'd Shells, make them fmooth on the Top, fcore them with a Knife, lay thin Slices of Butter on the Top of them, put them in a Dutch Oven to brown be- fore the Fire. - ^Three Shells is enough for a Difh.

To Jiew Mufhrooms*

Take large Buttons, wipe them with a wet Flannel, put them in a Stew Pan with a little Water, let them ftew a qiiarter of an Hour, then put in a little Salt, work a little Flour and Butter to make it as thick as Cream, let it boil five Minutes, when you Difh it up, put two large Spoonfuls of Cream mixt with the Yolk of an Egg, fliake it over the Fire about a Minute or two, but don't let it boil for fear of Curdling; put Sippet round the Infide of the Rim of the Difh, but not toafted, and ferve itup.

264 The Experienced

It is proper for a Side Difli for Supper, or a

Corner for Dinacn

To make Muftiroom Loaves.

Tak£ fmall Buttons, walk them as for Pick- ling, put them in a Tolling Pan, with a Httle white Bread Crumbs that have been boiled half an Hour in Water, then boil your Mufhrooms in the Bread and Water five Minutes, thicken it with Flour and Butter, and two Spoonfuls of Cream, but no Yolks of Eggs, put in a little Salt, then take five fmall French Rolls, make Holes in the Tops of them about the fize of a Shilling, and fcrape out all the Crumb, and put in your Mufhrooms; ftick a Bay Leaf on rhe Top of every Roll.

Five is a handfome Dilh for Dinner, and three

for Supper,

To raggoo Mufhrooms,

Take large Muflirooms, peel and takeout the Infide, broil them on a Gridiron, when the Oucfide is brown, put them into a Toffing Pan, with as much Water as will cover them, let them ftatid ten Minutes, then put to them a Spoonful of White Wine, the fame of BrowD- ing, a very little Allegar, thicken it with Flour and Butter, boil it a little j lay Sippets round your Diih, and ferve it up.

To

Engi^isji H0!USE.-K:EE'PER. .265

To ftev) Peas v)tth Letticcs.

SnkLL .your, Peas, boil them in hard Water wi^h Salt in it, drain them in a Sieve, then cut your Lettices in Slices, and. fry them in freflx Butter, pijt y
To 'poach 'Eggs . vo'tth Toafls.

iPu*r lyour^iWater on ip a fls^t Bottom Pan, witii a little: Salt, when it boils .break your Eggs.careffilly in, and let them boil two Mi- nutes, then take them up with an Egg Spoon, and lay, them on buttered To^ifts.

« To djrefs i'E^&i and Spinagc.

^Pi'CK and -iwjafh yoior .Spinage in feveral

-Watqrs, fet a Pan over. the^ Fire with a large

Quantity of Water, > throw aHiandful of Salt in,

Timen it' boils put ^your^S^pinage in, jand Jet it

boil two Minutes, take it up wi^h a Fifh Slice,

and lay it on the Bjgk pf, a H^ir Sieve, fqueeze

'the Wafier out, and put it in a Tolling Pan,

iWith.a quarter of a Pound of z3utter> keep

turning and cbopping.it with,a&nife, /till it

•is quite dry, then prefs it a. lit de> betwixt two

•Pewter Plates, cut it the Shape of Sippets, and

' ibme * in: Diamonds, . poach, your Eggs as be-

. LI fore,

^^66 The Experienced

fore, and lay them on your Spinagc, and fare them up hot.

«

N. B. Y6\i may boil Brocoli iiiftead of Spinage, and lay it in Btinches betwixt every Egg.

JTo drefs Eggs mtb Artichoke Bottoms.

Boil your Artichoke Bottoms in hard Wal- ter, if dry ones in fof t Water, put in a good Lump or Butter in the Water, it will make them boil in half the Time, and thev will be white and plump, when you take them up, put the Yolk of a hard Egg in the Middle of every Bottom, and pour good melted Butter upon them, and ferve them up; you may hy Afparagus, or Brocoli betwixt eveig^ Hottova.

To make a fricafey of Eggs.

Boil your Eggs pretty hard, cut them in round Slices, make a White Sauce the fame Way as for boiled Chickens, pour it over your Eggs, lay Sippets round them, and put a whole Yolk in the Middle of your Plate. It is proper for a Comer Diih at Supper,

To fry Saufagcs*

Cut them in fingle Links, and fry them in frefh Butter, then take a Slice of Bread and fry it a good Brown in the Butter you fried the Saufages in, and lav it in the Bottom of your Difli, put the Saulages on the Toaft, in

four

English HOUSE-KEEPER. %6i

four Parts, and lay poached Eggs betwixt them; pour a little good melted Butter round them, and ferve them up.

To ftev) Cucumbers.

Peel o£F the Out-rind, flice the Cucumbers pretty thick, fry them in frelh Butter, and lay UiexiL on a Sieve to drain, put them into a Tof^ fci^ Pah with a large Glals of Red Wine, the £une of ftrong Gravy, a Blade or two of Mace, ibake it pretty thick with Flour and Butter; and when it boils up put in your Cucumbers, keep fhaking them, and let them boil five Minutes, be careful you don't break themj pour them into a Difh, and ierve them up.



To make an Amulet.

Put a quarter of a Pound of Butter into a Frying Pan, break fix Eggs and beat them ^ little^ ftrain them through a Hair Sieve, put theni in when your Butter is hot, and ftreifr in a little fliread Parfley and boiled Ham fcraped fine, with Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, fry it brown on, the Under-fide, lay it on your Di£h but don't . turn it, hold a hot Salamander half a Minute over it to take off the raw look of the Egg^; ftick curled Parfley in it, and ferve it up.

N. B. You may put in Clary and Chives or

Onions if you like.

L 1 2 To

t6S The Experienced

To Make Pana'da.

Grate the Cnimb of a Penny Loaf and boil it in a Pinijrttf Water, with one Ooiod and a few Pepper-corns, 'till quite thick and foft, then ptit in two' Ounces of Bntter, i Tit- tle Salt, and hatf a Pint of thick Cremi, kee itirring it 'till it ii like a fine Guftardi pmr it into a Soup Plate, and fcrve it up.

N. B. You niiy ufe Sugar and! Cufrasts isSod of Onions and Pepper-corns if you pleaft.

To make a Rarneqain of Cheefe;

Take fome old Chefhire Cheefe, a Lump of Butter, and the Yolk of a hard boiled Egg, and beat it very well together in a Marble Mortar, fpread it on forae Slices of Bread toafted and buttered; hold a Salamander over theili, and fend them up.

PART

p A R T nr.

CHAP. xni.

OhJer*Mthns an Potting and Collaring.

GOVE^ yotlr Meat well with Butter, and tie over it flrong Paper, and bake it well, wiien it comes oat of the Oven pick out all the Skins quite clean, and draia the Meat from the Gravy, or the Skins will hinder it from looking well, and the Gravy will foon turn it four, beat your Seafoning Vrell before you put in your Meat, and put it in by Etegrecs, as you are beating; when you put it into vour Pots, prefs it well, and let it be quite cold before you pour the clarified

Butter over it. In Collaring be careful you

toll it up, and bind it clofe, boil it 'till it is thoroughly enough, when quite cold, put it into Pickle with the Binding on, next Day take off the Binding^ when it will leave the Skin clear; make f refli Pickle often^ and your Meat will keep good a long Time.

To pot Beef*

Rub twelve Pounds of Beef with half a Pound of brown Sugar, and one Ounce of Salt Petre, let it lie twenty-four Hours, then wafh

it

270 The • Experienced

it clean, and dry it well with a Cloth, feaibn it with a little beaten Mace, Pepper and Salt k> your Tafte, cut it in five or fix Pieces, ind put it in an 'Earthen Pot, with a Pound of Butter in Liimps upon it, fet it in a hot Oven, a;nd let it ftand three Hours, then take it out, cut off the hard Outfides, and beat it in a Mor- tar, add to it a little more Mace, Pepper, and 5alt; oil a Pouijd of Butter in the Gravy and Fat that came from your Beef, and put it in as you fee it requires it, and beat it exceeding fine, then put it in your Pots, anji prefs it clofe ^qy/n; pour clarified Butter over it, and keep it in a dry Place^

To pot Beef to eat like V^nifoij.

Put ten Pounds of Beef into a deep Difli, pour oyer it a Pint of Red Wine, and let it lie in it for two Days, then feafon it with Mace, Pepper, and Salt, aijd put it into a Pot with the Wine it was lleeped in, s^dd to it a large Gl^Ss more of Wine, tie if down with Paper, and bake it three Hours in a quick Oven; when you take it out, beat it in a Mortar or Wooden Bowl, clarify a Pound of Butter, and put it in as you fee it requires it, keep beating it 'till it is a fine Pafte, then put it into your Pots, lay a Paper over it, and fet on a Weight to prefs ii down J the next Day poiir clarified Butter over it, and keep it in a dry Place for Ufe.

To

L

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 27X

? • •

To pot Ox Cheek.

When you ftew an Ox Cheek, take fome of the flefliy Part and feafon it well with Salt . and Pepper, and beat it very fine in a Mortar with a little clear Fat ikimed oS the Gravy, then •put it clofe into your Potting Pots, and pour over it clarified Butter and keep it for Ufe.

To pot Venifon.

If your Venifon be ftale, rub it with Vine* gar, and let it lie one Hour, then dry it clean witli a Cloth, and rub ii all over with Red Wine, feafon it with beaten Mace, Tepper, and Salt, put it on an Earthen Difli, and pour over it half a Pint of Red Wine, and a Pound of Butter, and fet it in the Oven; if it be a Shoul- der, put a coarfc Pafte over it, and bake it all Night in a brown Bread Oven; when it comes out, pick it clean from the Bones, and beat it in a Marble ^ Mortar, with the Fat from your Gravy; if you find it not feafoned enough, add more Seafoning and clarified Butter, and keep beating it 'till it is a fine Pafte, then prefs it hard down into your Pots, and pour clarified Butter over it, and keep it in a • dry Place.



To pot Veal.

Cut a Fillet of Veal in three or four Pieces, feafon it with Pepper, Salt, and a little Mace, put it into Pots with half a Pound of Butter,

tie

27a 1^€ EXPEHIENCEP

tie a Paper over it, and fet it in a hot Oven, and bake it. three Hoiira, when you take it out, cut off all the Outlides, then put the Veal in a j^?Iarble Mdrtar, and rbeart lit with -the 1?at £roxn your
To pot Marble Vesil.

flaiL a dried Tongue, fldn it,:and. entity thin as poflible, and beat it iCiceedin^ well, withfnear a Pound trf-Butter, andalitde^beaten Mace, 'till it is like a Pafibe, ihave ready Veal ftewed and beat the fame Way as^beforc, then put fome Veal;into -your Potting Pots, tijen fome Tongue in:Lumps 'Over ithe .Veal j 'fill your Pot clbfe up with Veil, and prefs- it Ycry hard dawuj and pour . clarified Butter over it, and keep it in aury ]^Iace«

N.:B. Don*tlay on yourTongueanonyPonn, but in Lumps,: and it'Will.cut •like'>MarUe, when you fend it to the Table, cut it out in Slices, and gamifli with, curled Parlley*

To

English HOUSE^KEfiPER. 273

Tq pot TongueJ.



Tak£ 1 Neat's Tongue^ and rub it with an Ounce of Salt Pctre, and four Ounces of brown Sugar^ and let it lie two Davs, then boil it 'till it is quite tend^r^ and take off the Skin and Side-bits, then cut the Tongtie in very thin .Slices, aiid beat it in a Marble Mortar, v^ith one Pound of clarified Butter, Mace, Pep- per, and Salt to your TaAe, beat it exceeding fine, Chen put it clofe down into fmall Potting Pots, and pour clarified Butter otner tfaem.

7a fvt a Hare.

Hang njk your Hasc four or fire Days with the Skin on, then cafe it, and cut it up as for ^^ting, put it in a Pot, and feafon it witn Mace, Pepper^ and Salt,, put a Pound of Buttei!' upon it, tie it down, and bake it in a Bread Oven, when it comes out, pkk it clean from the' Bonesy and poand it very fine in a Mortal^, with the Fat from your Qravy, then put it clofe down into your Pots, and pour clarified Butter over it, and keep it in a dry Place.

To pot Ham v)ttb Chicken.

Take as much Leamof a boiled Ham as y
Mm beat

274 "^^ £XPER1'&NG£D

beat the white Part of a Fowl with a very Ik- tie fcafoning, it is to qualify the Ham; put a lay of Chicken, then one of Ham, then Chicken at the Top, brefs hard dowh,^ and when it is cold, pour clarified Butter over it; when you fend it to the Table cut out a thin Slice in the form of half a DianK>nd^ and lay it round the Edge of your Pot.

, • .

To ^pot Woodcocks.

• Pluck fix Woodcocks, draw out the Train, ikewej their Bills through their Thighs, and put the Legs through each other, and their Feet upon their Breails^: f eafon them with tluree or four Blades of Mace, and a little Pepper and Sattj then put them into a deep* Pot, with a Pound of Butter over them, t ^ a, ftrong Paper over them, and bake them in ^ moderate Oven; when they are enough, lay them on a;; Difli to drain the Gravy from them, then put them into Potting Pots, and take all the dear Batter from your Gravy, and put it upon them, and fill up your Pjots with clarified Butter, aod keep them in a dry Place.

. ^. . • ?

To pot Moor Game.

Pi CK and draw your Moor Game, wipe them dean with a Cloth, and feafoh them pretty well with Mace, Pepper, and Salt, put oat Leg through the other, roaft them 'till they are quite enough, and a good brown; -when they are cold put them into P(Xting Pots, and poor over overthaxL clarified Butter, and keep them in a dry Place.-

N. B. Obfcrve to leave their Heads uncovered ¦with Butter.


To pot Pigeons.

Pi ck your Pigeons, cut off the Pinions, wafh them clean, and put diem into»a Sieve to drain, then dry them with a Cloth, and feafoo them with Pepper and Salt, roll a Lump of Butter in chopped PanQey, and put it into- the Pigeons, few up the Vent, then uut theni into a Pot with Butter over them, tie tnem down, and fet them in a^ moderate^ Oven; when they come out, puLC them into Potting Pots, and cover theni well with clarified Butter,

To pot all Kinds of fmall Birds.

Pick and * gut your Bitds, dry them well with a Cloth, feafon them with JMace, Pepper, and S^lt, then put them into a Pot widi Butter, tie your Pot down with Papcr^ and bake them in a moderate Oven: when they come out, drain the Gravy from them, and put them into Potting Pots, and cover them with clarified Butter..

To make a cold Porcupine of Beef,

Salt a Flank of Beef the fame Way as you did the .Ro\ind of Beef, and turn it every Day for a Fbrtpight; u les^ then lay it flat upoBt Table, beat it an Hour, or 'till it ia (km dl over, then rub it over with the Yolks of three l^ggs, fir^w over it a quarter of aa Ounce of beaten Mace, th^ fame of, Nutmeg, Peppet, and "Salt to your Tafte, the Crumb of two Penny Loafs, £^o4 ti^o large Ha idfuls pf Parlley ihread fmall, then cover it with diia Slices of fat 99CQI1, and roll your Beef up Jtrj tighu ^4 bmd it v«U with PadL-thnad, boil t f ouf ^ouF4, Yfhfin it i» «cdd, Lard it all over, one ^ow wi^ the Lean of .^ Ham» a feco4d ¥^ h Ciici^obers, a third wtdi i^tBA^ fQP^ f;ut them in Pieties aJbout.the thkfcaefs of 9. Pipe, ihs^rik and Lard it 6) that it may appear Red, Green, »nd White; &nd it to the Table with PickleiB and fcraped Horfe-caddiih roaad it, keep it in Salt and Water, and a litde Viner gar.< - ^You may keep it fo\u: op ^ve Days with* out Pickle;.

To eoUar a Bicaf^ of Veal;

9^)iE your Veal, und beat it a Httle, tbe« yub it oyer with tlje Yolk of im Egg,, ftiew all over it ^. little beaten Mace, Nutmeg, Peppei^ and SftU, a large Handful of Parfley chopped fmfiU, with a lewSpfigs of Sweet Maijonim, a little Lemon Peel cut exceeding fine, one Anchovy waihed, boned, and chopped very fmall, and mi:
English HOUSl-KEEPER. %n

it is enoiigii, han ; it up by one End^ and make a Pickle for it \ to one Pint of Salt and MTater, put half a Pint of Vinegar, when yoit Eend ic to the Table, cut a Slice oS one Eod: ^arniOi with Pickles and Pariley.

To coffdr^a CalfVHcad,*

Take aCalfVHead with the Skin on, and

irefs oiF tka Hair, then rip it down the Faoe,

and take out all. the Bones carefully from the

Meat, and fieep it in warm blue Milk» 'till it

is White, then lay it flat, and rub it with the

White of an £^, and ftrew over it a Tea

Spoonful of White Pepper, two or three Blades

of beaten Mace, and one Nutmeg, a Spoonful

ef Salt, vjfo Scdre of Oyfters choppM fmall^

half a Pound of Beef Marrow, and a large

Handful of ParAey, lay them all over the In«

fide of the Head, cut off the Ears, and lay

diem in the thin Part of the Head, then roll ic

ftp tight, bind it up wi(h a Fillet, and wrap H

Up in a clean Clotn, boil it two Hours, and

when it is almoft cold, bind it up with a frdh

Fillet, and put it in a Pickle made as abovCi

9nd keep it for Ufe,

To c$ltar a Brcaft ^Mutcon*

BoKE your Mutton, and rub it over with Ihe Volk of an E^g, then grate over it a little Le« taxsa. ^ed, and a Nutmeg, with a little Pepper ftud Salt, then chop fmall one Tea Cuj^l Xif Capen, ^wo AnchovieB, ilu^ad fine a Handful

of

t

^8 . The:EXTPERI ENCED

I

(Elf Parlley, a few Sweet Herbs, mil them witM the Crumb of a Peiany. Loaf, and flxew it over your Mutton, and roll it up tight, boil it rati Hours, then; take it up, and put it in a Pickk made as for the Calf 's Head,

To collar m- Pig.

Ki LL your Pig, dr^s off the Hair, and draw out the Entrails, and wajQti* it clfaa, take a £barp JCnife, rip it open, and take- out all die Bones, then rub it all ov^r with Pepper ail Salt beaten fine, a few Sag^ Leaves; and Sweet Herbe chopped finall, then roll u.p yoiir Pig tight, and bind it with a FiUet, ijhien fill yoitt Boiler with fott Wat^r, one Pint of Vinegar* and a Handful of Salt, eight or ten Cloves, % Hade or two of Mace, a few Pepper-corns, aoA a Bunch of Siwreet Herbs \ when it boils put.ift your Pig, and boil it 'till it is tender, than taJce it lip, and when it is almoft cold, bin4 it oyer again, and put it into an Earthen Pot, and poor the Liquor your Pig was boiled in i^xm i^t keep it covered, and it is fit for Ufe.

To collar a Swine s Face.

Chop the Face in tnany Places, andwafliit in feveral Waters, then boU it 'till the Meat will rleave the Bones, take out the Bones, oit open die Ears, and take out the Ear Ro(Ks, cut the Meat in Pieces^ and feaibn it ^yith Pepp^ and Salt, while it is hot put it into an Eaitha

Pot, but put the Ears round the Outfide of thf

Meat,

English HOUSE-KEEPER, 279

Meat, put a Board on that will go in the Infide of the Pot, and fet a heavy Weight upon it, and let it fland all Night, the nest Day turn it out, cut it round-ways and it wili look clofe and bright.

To mah Mock Brawn.

• * 1 '

Take a Piece of the Belly Part, . and the Head of a young Porket, rub it with Salt Petrey and kt it lie three Days, then wafh it clean, fplit the Head and boil ir, then take out the bones, and cut it in Pieces, then take four Ox Feet boiled tender and cut in thin Pieces, lay it in your Belly Piece with the Head cut fmall, then jpoU it up tight with Sheet Tin, that a Trencher wili go in' at each End, boil it four or five Hours, when it comes out, fet it upon one End and prefs the Trencher down with a lar^e L^d Weight, let it Hand all Night, and in the Morning take it out of your Tin, and bind I it with a white Fillet, put it into cold Salt and Water, arid it will be fit for Ufe*

N. B. You muft make frefli Salt and Water every four Days, and it will keep a long

Time*

«

To coUqr Hat Ribs of Beef.

Bone your Beef, lay it flat upon a Table, and beat it half an Hour with a wooden Mal- let 'till it is quite foft, then rub it with fix Ounces of brown Sugar, four Ounces of com- mon

d8Q The fixpEAitiKctD

ittcm Salt» and one Ounce of Sale Petre beat $ne, let it lie then for ten Days, suad turn it cmce every Day, cake it OUt^ theii pui it ia warm Water for ei&;ht or ten Hours^ then laj it flat upon a Table, with the oucwardSkia down, and cut it in Rows, tod a-crofs about the Breadth of your Finger^ but take Care you don't cut the outfide Skin, then fill one Nick ^ith chopped Pariley, th^ fecoad with fat Pork, the third with Crumbs of Bread, Mace^ Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt then Parfley, and fo on 'till you have filled all ydur Nicks, then toll it up tight, and bind it round with coarfe broad Tape, wrap it in a Cloth and boil it four or fire Hours^ then take it up, and hang it vif by one end of the String to keep it rounds faTc the Liquor it was boiled in^ the next Day fkini ic» and add to it half the Quantity of Allegar a» you have liquor, and a little Mace, Loitf Pepper, and Salt, then put in your Beef aod keep it for Ulfe. » N. B. When you fend it to the Table cut a little off both Ends, and it vdll be in Diamonds of diffezcnt Colours, and look very- pretty^ ^t it upon a Diih as you do Brawn, if you nuke,   a frefli Pickle every Week it will keep a toQg ' Time.

To collar Beef.

Salt your Beef and beat it as before^ Uttat rub it over with the Yolks of Eggs» ftrew over it two large Handfiils of Parfley uread (ioaall,

half

- Engi^ish HQUSR-KEiEPER. aSi

half * an OuncjS^ pf JVlace, Bladj:. Pepper md Salt jto your Taile, roll it uptight, and bind.it ^about, ^th a coarfe. Inroad Tape, and boil it 'till i*it is tender; make a Pickle. for it' the fame iWay as before::

»>

To forct a Round ^f Beef.

Take a good round of Beef, and rub it oyer

a quarter of an Hour with two Ounces of Salt

Petre, the fame of Bay Salt, half a Pound of

brown Sugar, and a Pound of common Salt,

C*let'it He in it for ten or twelve Days, turu it

once every Day in the Brine, then wafli it well

ahd make holes in it with/ a Penknife -about an

Inch' one fronj another, and fill one hole with

•ihread Parfley, a^fecond with fat Pork^c^t in

iiaaalL Pieces, and a third with Bread Grunibs,

Beef Marrow, a little Mace, Nutmeg, P^pcr,

and Salt, mixed together, then Parfley, ancl fo


yoifr Beef in a Oofh, and biqd it with a^FjlJe;,

and boil it four Hours ^ when it is cold, bijjd

it over again, and cut a thin Slice off before

you fend it to the Table;Gamifli with Parfley

and Red Cabbage.

To fiufe fl Tyikey.

Kill yoUi? .Turkey and let it harig four or five Days in the Feathery, then pick it and flit it: up the Back, and take out the Enirails, bone it, and bind with a Piece of Matting like Stur- geon, or Newcaftle Salmon, fet over the Fire a < N n clean

282 Hie ExPERtEMCKD

trlean Sauce Pan, with a Pint of ftrong Allcgar; a Score of Cloves, three or four Blades of M«e, a Nutmeg fliced, a few Pepper Corns, and a Handful of Salt, when it boils put in the Tiir- . key, and boil it one Hour, then take it u^ and when cold, put it into an Earthen Po^ and pour the Liquor over it, and keep it foi Ufe; when you fend it to Table, lay Sprigs ol Fennel gver it,

X

To foufe Pigs Feet arid Ears*

Clean your Pigs Feet and Ears, ^nd boil them 'till they are tender, then fplit the Fed; and put them into Salt and Water witli the Ears J when you ufe them, dry them well with a Cloth, and dip them in Batter made of Flour and Eggs, fry them a good Brown, and fend them up with good melted Butter.

N.B* You may eat them coldj makefreii Pickle every two Days, and they will keep fome Time»

To foufi Tripe.

When your Tripe is boiled, put it into Sale and Water, change the Salt and Water cvtxj Day 'till jou ufe it, dip it in Batter, and fry it as the Pigs Feet and Ears, or boll it in frak Salt and Water, with an Onion fliced, and a few Sprigs of Parfley, and fend melted Butter for Sauce.

To

i

English HOUSE-KEEPER, a&j

To hang a Surloin of Beef to roaft.

Take the Suet out of a Surloin, and rub it Iialf an Hour with one Ounce of Salt Petre, fa%xv Ounces of common Salt, and half a Pound of brown Sugar, hang it iip ten or twelve Days, then waih it, and roaft it 5 you may eat it either hot or cold.

To fait Hams.

As foon as your Hams are cut out, rub them very well with one Ounce of Salt Petre, half an Ounce of Salt Prunella pounded, and one Pound of common Salt to every Ham, lay them in Lead or Earthen Salt Pans for ten Days, tarn them once in the Time, then rub them well with more common Salt, let them lie ten Days longer, arid turn them every Day, then take them out, and fcrape them exceeding clean, and dry them well with a clean Cloth, and rub it flightly over with a little Salt, and hang them up to dry«

To fmoke Hams.

When you take your Hams out of the Pickle, and have rubbed them dry with a coarfe Cloth, hang them in a Chimney, and make a Fire: of Oak Shavings, and lay over it Horfe Litterj and one Pound of Juniper Ber- ries, keiep the Fire fmothered down for two or three Days, then hang them up to dry.

N n 2 To

284 The Experienced-

I

f To fait Chops.

Throw over your Chops a Handfol of Salt, and lay them Skin-fide down a-ilant on a Board, to let all the Blood ran from them, the next Day poiind to every Pan: of Chops one Ounce of Bay Salt, the famie of Salt Petre, two Ounces of brown Sugar, and half a Pound of commonSalt, niix them together, and rub them exceeding well, let them lie ten Days in your Salting Ciftern, then rub them with common Salt, and let them lie a Week longer, and mb them clean, and hang them to dry in a dry Place,

To fait Bacon.

When your Pig is cut down, cut off the Hams and Head, if it be a large one, cut out a Chine, but leave in the Sparc Ribs, it keeps the Bacon from Tufting, and the Gravy in, fait it with common Salt, and a little Salt Petre, (but neither Bay Salt nor Sugar,) let it Uq teo Days on a Table, that will let all the Brine run from it, then fait it again ten cb: twelve Days, turning it every Day after the fecond Saltio?, then fcrape it very clean, rub ^ little dry Salt on it, and hang it up.

N. B, Take Care to fcrape the white Froth off very clean that is on it, which is caufed by the Salt to work out 'of your Pork, and rub on a Uttle dry Salt, itkceps the Bacon from rufting;

the

English HOUSE -KEEPER. 281

»

tlie dry Salt will candy and fhine like Diamonds 4on your Bacon. . ' .

To fa/t TojiQues.

SoKAFt your Tongues^ and dry thefn cleaft with a Cloth, and fait them well withjcom- mon Salt, and half an Ounce of Salt Petre to every Tongue, lay them in a deep Pot, and mm them every Day for a Week or ten Days# fait them again, and let them lie a Week long^er, take them up, dry them with a Cloth^ ¥lour them and hang them up.

«

Tofalua Leg o/" Mutton.

Pound one Ounce of Bay Salt, and half an Ounce of Salt Petre> and rub it all over your Leg of Mutton, and let it lie all Night; the next Day fait it weir with common Salt, and let it lie, a Week or ten Days, then hang it up todry^

Tq pickle Pork.

Cut your Pork in fuch Pieces as will be moft convenient, to lie in your powdering Tub,, rub every Piece all over with Salt Petre, then take one Part Bay Salt, an4two Parts common Salt, and rub every Piece well, lay the Pieces as clofe as poilible'in your Tub, and throw a little Salt over.

CHAP.

^ . The EXFERIEMCED

CHAP. XIV-

Ohfervaiions on Poffcts, Gruel, &ۥ

rr making Poflets, always mix a little of the hot Cream or Milk with your Wine, it will keep the Wine from curdling the reft, and take the Cream off the Fire before you mix altoge- ther.- Obferve in making Gruels, that you boil them in well-tined Sauce Pans, for nothing will fetch the Verdigreafe out of Copper focraer than Acids or Wines, which are the chief In-. gredients in Gruels, Sagos, and Wheys, don't let your Gruel or Sago Ikim'over, for it bcHls into them, and makes them a muddy Colour.

To make a Sack Poflec

9

Grate two Naples Bifkets into a Pint of thin Cream, put in a Stick of Cinnamon, and fet it over a flow Fire, boil it 'till it is of a pro- per thicknefs, then add half a Pint of Sack, a Slice of the end of a Lemon, with Sugar to your Tafte, ftir it gently over the Fire, but flon't let it boil left it Curdle, ferve it up with dryToaft.



To make a Brandy Poilec.

Bo I L a Quart of Cream over a flow Fire, wi& a Slick of Cinnamon in it, take it off to cod, beat the Yolks of fix Eggs very well, and mix them with the Cream, add Nutmeg and Sugar

to

English •ROUSE-KEEPER. 287

to your Tafte, fet it over a flow Fire and ftir it one vray, when it is like a fine thin Cuftard^ take it off, and pour it into your Tureen or Bovrl^ with a Glafs of Brandy, ftir it gently together, and ferve it up with Tea Wafers round it.

To Make a Lemon Poflct#

Grate the Crumb of a Penny Loaf very jfine, and put them into rather more than a Pint of Water, with half a Lemon Peel grated, or Su- gar rubbed upon it to take out the Eilencef Doil them* together 'till it look thick and cleart then beat it very well; - to the Juice of half a Lemon, put a pint of Mountain Wine, three Ounces of Jordan Almonds, and one Ounce of bitter, beat fine with a little Orange Flower, or French Brandy, and Sugar to your Tafte, mix it vrell and put it in your Poffet, ferve it up ia a Tureen or Bowl.

N, B. An Orange Poilct is made the fame Way.

• » » ¦

To make an Almond Poflec

Grate the Crumbs of a Penny Loaf very fine, potu: a Pint of boiling Milk upon themi let them ftand two or three Hours, then beat it exceeding well, add to it a Quart of good Cream, four Ounces of Almonds blanched, and beat as fine as poflible, with Rofe-Water, mix them all well together, and fet tl;iem over a

very

^k88 . ' The EXPE Rl i'NCTED ."^

-Very flow Fire an3 boil them a Quarter of an Hour, -then fet it to cool, and beat the Yolks of ibur EggSj and mix them with your Cnam i?rhett it is cold, fweiten it to your Tafte; then ftir it/ over a -flow Fire, 'till iiti grows pretty thick, but don't let it boil, it will curdle, then pour it into a China Bowl; when you fend it to Table^piit in three Maorooiia to fwim on die Top. /jr.:, : Jt is >rpper for Top at Supper^

^ / ., < • I, ./-¦.,. ¦ • • V

To-mak^ a Wmt Pofleic.

^ ' ¦ '' •

, T^KK a Quart of new Milk, and the Crximb of^a flPermy Loaf^ and boil them 'till tbey are foft,"i when you take it off the Fire, grace in half' a Nutmeg, and Sugar to your Tafte, then pmut into a, China Bowi,: and put in a Pint of Xiifbon Wine carefully a little. at a Time,-ark «iill^/i]tiak€ ih^ Curd hard and tough; fjsrvt k up with Toaft and Butter upon a Plate:

«• •

To make nn Ale Pdflec.

. Put a little white Bread in a Pint of good Milk, fet it over; the Fire, tJjcai warm a litde more than a Pint of good flrong Ale, with tTutmeg and Sugar to your Tailc, tnen put it in a Bowl, when your Milk boils pour it ujxm- your Ale, let it' Aand a few Minutes to clear, ^nd. the Curd will rife to the Top and ferve

itUp^ r, . .

, TV

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 289

To mull Wine.

Grater half a Nutmeg into a Pint of Wine and fweeten it to your Tafle with Loaf Sugar, fet it over the Fire, and when it boils take it off to cool, beat the Yolks of four Eggs ex- ceeding well, add to them a little cold Wine, then mix them carefully with your hot Wine a little at a Time, then pour it backwards and forwards feveral Times till it looks fine and bright; then fet it on the Fire and heat it a little at a Time for feveral Times till it is quite hot and pretty thick, and pour it backwards and forwards feveral Times; then fend it in Chocolate Cups and ferve it up with dry Toaft, cut in long narrow Pieces.

To muU Ale.

Take a Pint of good ftrone Ale, put it into a Sauce Pan, with three or rour Cloves, Nut- meg and Sugar to your Tafte, fet it over the Fife, when it boils take it off to cool, beat the Yolks of four Eggs very well, and mix them with a little cold Ale, then put it to your warm Ale, and pour it in and oiit of your Pan for feveral Times, then fet it over a flow Fire and heat it a little, then take it off again and heat it two or three Times 'till it is quite hot, then ferve it up with dry Toaft.

O o Tt

290 The EXPERI ENCED

To make mutled Wine.

• •

Bo^ L a Quart of new Milk five Minutes, with a Stick of Cirinainon, Nutmeg, ahci Sugar to .your Tafte, then take it off the Fire and let it fland to cool, Beat the Yolks of fix Eegs very well, and mix them with a little cold Cream, then mix them with your Milk, and pour it backwards- and, forwards the fame as you do mulled Ale, and fend it to the Table with a JPlatepf Bifkets.

To make Beef Tea.

Take a Pound of lean Beef, cut it in Very thin Slices, put it into a Jar, and pour a Quart of boiling Water upon it, cover it very clofe to keep in the Steam, let it fland by the Fire, it is very good for a weak Conftitution, it muff be drank when it is new Milk warm.

To make Chicken Broth.

Ski N a fmall Chicken, and fplit it in two, and toil one Half in three half Pints of Water, with a Blade or two of Mace, a fmall Cruft of white Bread, t>oil it over a flow Fire 'till it is reduced to half the Quantity, pour it into a Bafon, and take off the Fat, and fend it up with a dry Toaft.

To

English H0USE-I^EB;PER. 291

To make Cliicken Water.

Skin half a Fowl, break the Bones, and cut tlie JFlefli as thin as poflible, then put it into a Jar, and pour a Pint of boiling Water upon it, cover it clofe up, and f<^t it by the Fire for three Hours, and it will be ready to drink;.

To make Mutton Broth.

Take the Scrag-end of a Neck of Mutton, chop it into fmall Pieces, put it into a Sauce Fan, and fill it with Water, fet it pver the Fire, arid when the Scum begins to rife,' take it clean off, and put in a Blade or two of M^ce, a little French Barley, or a Cruft of white Bread to thicken it; *when you have boiled your Mutton that it will fhake to Pieces, ftrain your Broth through a Hair Sieve, f(puin off the Fat, and fend it up with a diy Toaft!

Tq ^ake Wine Whey.

Put a Pint of fkimed Milk, and half a Pint of White ''yVine into a 6'aiorf, let it ftand a few Minutes, then pour over it a Pint of boiling Water, l^t it ftand a little, and the Curd wiu gather of a Liimp, and fettle to the Bottom, then pour your Whey into a China Bowl, and put in a Lump of Sugar, a Sprig of Balin, or a Slice of Lemon, '

O o 2 To

\



292 The Experienced

To make Scurvy Grafs Whey.

Boi L a Pint of blue Milk, take 1% off to cqo!, then put in two Spoonfuls of the Juice of Scurvy Grafs, and two Spoonfuls of good old Verjuice, fet it over the Fire and it will tunj to a fine Whey; it is very good to drink in the Spring for the Scurvy*

To make Cream of Tartar Whey.

Put a Pint of blue Milk over the Fire, when it begins to boil, put in two Tea Spoonfuls of Cream of Tartar, then take it off the Fire, and let it ftand 'till the Curd fettles to the Bottom of the Pan, then pour it into a Bafon to pool, and drink it Milk warm.

To make Barley Water.

Take two Ounces of Barley, boilitintwa Quarts of Water till'it looks white and the Bar- ley grows foft, then ftrain the Water from the Barley, add to it a little Ciiirant Jellf oi Lemon.

N, B. You may put a Pint of more Water w your Barley, and boil it over again,

To make Groat Gruel.

Bo I L half a Pint of Groats in three Pints of Water or more, as you wpuid have yoxu: GrucI

English HOUSE- KEEPER. 293

for Thicknefs, with a Blade or two of Mace iri it, when your Groats are foft^i put in it White Wine and Sugar, to your Tafte, then take it off the Fire, put to it a Quarter of a Pound of Cur- rants walhed and picked, put it in a China Boxsrly with a Toaft of jBread round it, cut in iQng narrow Pieces.

To make Sagoe GrueL

Take four Ounces of Sagoe, give it a.fcald in hot Water, then drain it through a Hair-Sieve, and put it over the Fire with two Quarts of Water and a Stick of Cinnamon, keep fcum- xning it till it grows thick and clear, when your Sagoe is enough, take out the Cinnamon and put in a Pint of Red Wine, if you would have it very ftrong put in more than a Pint, and fwecten it to your Tafte, then fet it over the Fire to warm, but don't let it boil after the Wine is

{mt in, it weakens the Tafte and njakes the Co- ournot fo deep a red, pour it into a Tureen, and put in a Slice of J-emoq, when you are fending it to Table.

It is proper for a top Dilh for Supper.

make Sagoe witb Milk.

¦»

Wash your Sagoe in warm Water, and fet it over the Fire with a Stick of Cinnamon, and as much Water as will boil it thick and foft, then put in as much thin C^ream or new Milk as will make it a proper Thicknefs, grate in half a

Nutmeg,

294 The Experienced

Nutnjeg, fweeten it to your Tafte, and fearvg it up in a China-Bowl or a Tureen.

tisi proper for a top Difli for Suppei:.

To make Barley Gruel.

Take Your Ounces of Pearl Badey, boil it ia two Quarts of Water w;ith a Stick of Cinnamon in it, till it is reduced to one Quart, add to it a little more than a Pint of Red Wme, and Sugar to your Tafte, wafh and pick two or three Ounces. of Currants very cleaa.

71? make Water GrueL

> • w

Take one Spoonful of Oatmeal, boil it in three Pints of Water for an Hour and Hal^ or till it is fiine and fmooth, then take it off thj? Tire an4 k^. it ftand tp fettle, theii^ pour it in a China Bowl, and add Whitp Wine, Sugar apd Nutmeg to your Tafte, ferve it'up tot with a Toaft buttered upon ^ Plate*

To make a fweet Panada.



Cut all the Cruft of a Penny Loaf, flice the reft very thip and put it ipto a SajiQe Pan with a Pint of Water, boil it 'till it is very fof t and looks clear, then pu;: in ^. Glafs of Sack or ^^d6ira Wine, grate in a little Nutmeg ajnid put In a Lump of Butter the Size of a Walnut, and jSugar to ypi^^ Tafte, beat it exceeding fine^ tbcn put it in a deep Soup Pifh and £erve it .up.

N. B. You

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 29s

N. B. You may leave oiit the "Wine and Sugar, and put in a little good Cream and a little Salt, if you like it better.

To make Chocolate.

Scrape four Ouhces of Chocolate and pour a Quart of boiling Witer upon it, mill it well with a Chocolate Mill, and fweeten it to your Tafte, give it a boil and let it ftand all Night, then liiill it again very well, boil it two Mi- nutes, then mill it 'till it will leave a Froth upon the Top of your Cups.

CHAP. XV. ' Ohfervations o« Wines, Catchup, tf/?i Vinegar.

WINE is a very neccflary Thing in moft Families, and is often fpoiled through Mifmanagement of putting together, for if you let it ftand too long before you get it cold, and don't take great Care to put your Barm • upon it in Time, it Summer-beams and blinks in ilie Tub, fo that it makes your Wine fret in the Calk, and will not let it fine j itise^jually as great a Fault to let it work too long m the Tub, for that takes oflf all the Sweetnefs arid Flavotu: of the Fruit or Flowers your Wine is made from, fo the only Caution I can give, is to be careful in following the Receipts, and to have your Veflels dry, rinfe them with

Brandy,

^ •

2g6 The Experienced

Brandy, and clofe them up as foon as your Wine has done fomenting.

To make Lemon Wine to drink like Citron

Water.

Pare five Dozen of Lemons very thin, put the Peels into five Quarts of French Brandy, and let them (land fourteen Days, then make the Juice into a Syrup, with three Pounds of fingle refined Sugar, when the Peels are ready; boil fifteen Gallons of Water with forty Pounds of fingle refined Sugar for half an Hour, then put it into a Tub when cool, add to it one Spoonful of Barm, let it work two Days, then tun it and put it in theBrandy, Peels and Syrup, ftir them all together and clofe up your CalK, let it Hand three Months, then bottle it, and it will be pale and as fine as any Citron Water, it's more like a Cordial than Wine,

To make Lemon Wine a fecond JVay.

To one Gallon of Water put three Pounds of Powder Sugar, boil it a Quarter of an Hour, fcum it well, then pour it on the Rinds of four Lemons pared very thin, make the Juice into a^ thick Syrup with half a Pound of the aboveAi- ^ar, take a Slice of Bread toafted and fpread on it a Spoonful of new Barm, put it in the Liquor when hike- warm, and let it work two Days, then tun it into your Calk, and let it fland three Months, and then Bottle it.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 297

m

Ta make Orange Wine.

To ten Gallons of Water, add twenty-four

Pounds of Lump Sugar, beat the Whites of fix

Eggs veiT well, and mix them when the Water

is cold, then boil it an Hour, fcum it very well,

take four Dozen of the rougheft and largeft

Seville Oranges you can get, pair them very thiii,

put them into a Tub, and put the Liquor on

thenj boiling hot, and when yoti think it is

cold enough add to it three or four Spoonful

of new Yeaft, with the Jaice of the Oranges,

and half an Ounce of Cochineal beat fine, and

boiled in a Pint of Water, ftir it all together

and let it work four Days, then put it in

the Calk, and in fix Weeks Time bottle it for

Ufe.

To make Orange Wine a fecond TVay.

To ten Gallons^ of Water, add twenty-fevea Pounds of Lump Siijgar, boil them one Hour, ikim it all the Time, then take the Peels off five Dozen of Oranges pared very thin, put them into a Tub, when you take the Liquor oflf the Fire, pour it upon them, and when it is al- moft cold add to it three Spoonful of good Yeaft and free from being bitter, with the Juice of all your Oranges, let it work two or three Days, ftir it twice a Day, then put it into a Barrel with orte Quart of Mountain Wine, and four Ounces of tlie Syrup of Citron, ftirred it well in the Liquor; leave the Barrel open 'till it

P p has

fit

1

v-^

298 The Experienced

has done working, then clofe it well up, let it fland fix Weeks and then bottle it.

To make Orange Wine a tbiM JVay.

Take fix Gallons of Water, and fifteen Pounds of Powder Sugar, the Whites of fix Eggs well beat, boil them all three Quarters of an Hour, and fcum it well; when it is cold for working, then take fix Spoonfuls of good Yeaft, and m Ounces of the Syrup of Lemons, mix them well, and add it to the Liquor, with the Juice and Peel of fiteen Oranges, let it work two Days and one Night, then tun it, and in three Monties bottle it.

To make Smyrna Raifin Wine.

To one hundred of Raifins, put twenty Gal- lons of Water, let it (land fourteen Days, then put it in your Calk, when it. has been in fix Months, add to it one Gallon of Ftench Brandy, and when it is fine, then bottle it.

To make Elder Raifin Wine*

To every Gallon of Water, put fix Pounds of Malaga Raifins ihread fmall, put them into a Vefifel, pour the Water on them boiling hot, and let it fi:and nine Days, fliirring it twice every Day, get the Elderberries when full ripe, pick them off the Sfalks, put them into an Earthen Pot, and fet them in a moderate Oven all Night, then ftrain them through a coarfe Cloth, and

to

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 299

to every Gallon of Liquor, add one Quart of this Juice, ftir it well together, then toaft a Slice of 3read, and fpread three Spoonfuls of Yeaft on 5oth Sides, and put it in your Wine, and let it work a Day or two, then tun it into •your Cafk, fill it up as it works over, when it has done working, clofe it up, and let it ftand one Year.

To make Raifin Wine another Way.

' Boil ten Gallons of Spring Water one Hour, when it is Milk warm, to every Gallon add fix Pounds of Malaga Raifins, clean picked and half chopped, ftir it up together twice a Day for nine or ten Days, then run it through a Hair Sieve, and fqueeze the Raifins well with yt>ur 'Hands, and put the Liquor in your Bar- rel, bung it clofe up, and let it ftand three Months, and then bottle it.

To make Ginger Wne-

T A K E four Gallons of Spring Water, and fe- ven Pounds of Lifbon Sugar, boil them a Quar- ter of an Hour, and keep fcurxiing it well, when the Liquor is cold, fqueeze in the Juice of two Lemons, then boil the Peels, with two Ounces of Ginger in three Pints of Water one Hour, when it is cold put it all together into the Barrel, with two Spoonful ot Yeaft, a Quarter of an Ounce of Ifinglafs beat very thm, and two Pounds of Jar Raifins, then clofe

Pp 2 it

300 The Experienced

it up, and let it ftand feven Weeks, then bottle it, the bell Seafon to make it is the Spring.

To make Pearl Goofcbcrry Wine.

Take as many of the beft Pearl Goofebenics when ripe as you pleafe, bruife them ^th a wooden Peftle in a Tub, and let them iland all Night, then prefs and fqueeze them through a Hair-Sieve, let the Liquor iland feven or eight Hours, then pour it clear from the Sedi- ments; and to every three Pints of Liquor add a Pound of double refined Sugar, and ftir it about 'till it is melted, then put to it five Pints, of Water, and two Pounds of more Sugar, then diflblve half an Ounce of Ifinglafs in Part of the Liquor, that has been boiled, put all in your Caik,. Hop it well up for three Months, then bottle it, and put in every Bottle a Lump of double refined Sugar.-^This is excellent Wine.

Tq make Goofcberry Wine afecorii Way.

«

To a Gallon of Water put three Pounds of Lump Sugar, boil it a Quarter of an Hour and fcum it very well, then let it ftatid 'till it is glnijoft cold, and take four Quarts of Goofe- berfies whea full ripe, and bruife them in a Marbje Mortar, and put them in your Vellel, then pour in the Liquor and let it iland two Days, and ftir it every four Hours, fteep half »n Ounce ©f Ifinglafs in a Pint of Brandy, two

Days

English HOUSE^KEEPER. 301

Days ftrain the Wine through a Flannel Bag into a Calk, then beat the Ifinglafs in a Marble ^^ortar with five Whites of Eggs, then wifk them together half an Hour and put it in the 'Wine and beat them altogether, clofe up your Calk and put Clay over it, let it Hand fix Months, then Bottle it off for Ufe, put in each Bottle a Lump of Sugar, and two Raifins of the Sun, this is a very rich Wine, and when it has been kept in the Bottles two or three Years, it will drink like Champaign.

To make Blackberry Wine.

Gather your Berries when they are fall ripe, take twelve Quarts and crulh them with your Hand, boil fix Gallons of Water with, twelve Pounds of brown Sugar, ^ Quarter of an Hour, fcum it well, then pour it on the ^blackberries, and let it Hand all Night, then ftrain it through a Hair-Sieve, put into yout Calk fix Pounds of Malaga Raifins a little cut^ then put the Wine into the Calk with one Ounce of Ifinglafs, which muft be diflblved in a little Cyder, llir it all up together, clofe it up and let it Hand fix Months, and then bottle it.

To make Rafpberry Wine.

Gather your Rafpberries when full ripe ^nd quite dry, crufli them diredtly and mix them with Sugar, it will preferve the Flavour lyljich they would loofe in pwo Hours, to every

Quart

302 The Experienced

Quart of Rafpberries, put a Pound of fine Powder Sugar, when you have got the Quan- tity you intend to make, to every Quart of Rafpberries add two Pounds of more Sugar, and one Gallon of cold Water, ftir it well together, and let it foment three Days, ftirring it five or fix times a Day, then put it in your Caflc, and for every Gallon put in two whole Eggs, take care they are not broke in putting them in, clofe it well up, and let it ftand three Months* then bottle it.

N. B. If you gather* the Berries when ' the Sun is hot upon them, and be quick in making your Wine, it will keep the Virtue in the Rafp- berries, and make the Wine more pleafaat.

To make Red Currant Wine.

Gather the Currants when full ripe, ftrip them from the Stems, and fqueeze out the

J[uice, to one Gallon of tlie Juice put two Gal- ons of cold Water, and two Spoonful of Yeaft, and let it work two Days, then ftrain it through a Hair-Sieve, at the fame Time put one Ounce of Ifinglafs to fteep in Cyder, and to every Gallon of Liquor add three Pounds of Loaf Sugar, ftir it well together, put it in a good Cafk, to every ten Gallons of Wine put two Quarts of Brandy, mix them all exceeding well in yoiir Cafk, clofe it well up, let it ftand four Months, then bottle it.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 303

To make Currant Wine another Way.

Take an equal Quantity of red and white Currants, bake th«ni an Hour in a moderate Oven, theii fqueeze them through a colrfe Cloth, what Water you intend. to ufe have it ready boiling, and to every Gallon of Water put in one Quart of Juice and three Pounds of Loaf Sugar, boil it a Quarter of an Hour, fcum it well, then put it in a Tub, when cool toaft a Slice of Bread and fpread on both Sides two Spoonfuls of Yeaft, and let it work three Days, ftir it three or four Times a Day, then put it into a Cafk, and to every ten Gallons ot Wine add a Quart of French Brandy, and the Whites of ten Eggs well beat, make the Caik clofe up, and let it Hand three Months, then bottle it.

N. B. This is a pale Wine, but is a very good one for keeping and drinks pleafajit*

To make Sycamore Wine*

Take two Gallons of tlie fap and boil it half an Hour, then add to it four Pounds of fine Powder Sugar, beat the Whites of three Eggs to a Froth, and mix them with the Liquor, but if it be too hot, it will porch the Eggs, fcum it very well,, and boil it half an Hour, then ftrain it through a Hair-Sieve, and let itftilnd till next Day, then pour it clear from the Sediments, put hajf a Pint of good Yeaft to every twelve

Gallons

304 The Experienced

Gallons, cover it clofe up with Blankets 'till it is white over, then put it into the Barrel, ?and leave the Bung-Hole open 'till it has done working, then clofe it well up, let it ftand three Months, then bottle it, the fifth Part of the Sugar niuft be Loaf, and if you like Raifins they are a great Addition to the Wine.

R B^ You may make Birch Wine the faiine Way-

To rnake Birch Wine a Jecond Way.

Boil twenty Gallons of Birch Water half an Hour, then put in thirty Pounds of Baftard Sugar, boil your Liquor and Sugar three Quarters of an Hour and keep fcumraing it all the while, then put it into a Tub and let it ftand till it is quite cold, add to it three Pints of Yeaft, ftir it three or four Times a Day for four or five Days, then" put it into a Calk with two Pounds of Malaga Raifins, and one Pound of Loaf Sugar, "and half an Ounce of Ifin^lafs which muft be diflblved in Part of the Liquor, then put to it one Gallon of new Ale that is ready for tunning, work it very well in the Caik five or fix Days, then clofe it up and let it Hand a Year, then bottle it off.

To make Walnut Wine.

To every Gallon of Water put two Pounds of brown Sugar, and one Pound of Honey, boil them half an Hour, and take off the Scum, put into the Tub a handful of Walnut Leaves

to

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 305

to every Gallon, and pour the Liquor upon them, let it ftand all Nighr, then take out the Leaves, and put in half a Pint of Yeaft, and let it >^ork fourteen Days, beat it four or five Times a Day, which will take off the Swect- nefs, then tlop up the Calk, and let it iland fix Months.

This is a good Wine againft Confumptions, or

any inward Complaints.

To make Cowflip Wine.

To two Gallons of Water add two Pounds and a half of Powder Sugar, boil them half an Hour, and take ofi^ the Scum as it rifes, then pour it into a Tub to cool, with the Rinds of two Lemons, when it is cold, add four Quarts of Cowflip Flowers to the Liquor^ with the Juice of two Lemons, let it Hand in the Tub two Day is, ftirring it every two or three Hours, and then put it in the Barrel, and let it Hand three Weeks, or a Month, then Bottle it, and put a Lump of Sugar into every Bottle.

N. B. It makes the beft and ftrongeft Wine to have only the Tops of the Peeps.

j4 fecond Way to make Cowflip Wine.

Boil twelve Gallons of Water a quarter of an Hour, then add two Pounds and a half of Loaf Sugar to every Galloq of Water, then boil it as long as the Scum rifes 'till it clears

CLq itfelf,

3o6

Tlie EXPEKI ENCED

itfelf, ^vhen almoft cold, pour it into a Tub, with one Spoonful* of Yeaft, let it work one Day, then put in Thirty- two Quarts of Cow- flip Flowers, and let it work two or three Days, then put it all into a BaiTel, with the Parings of twelve Lemons, the fame of Oranges, make the Juice of them into a thick' Syrup, with two or three Pounds of Loaf Sugar; when the Wine has done working, add the Syrup to it, then flop up your Barrel very well, and let it fland two or three Months, then Bottle it.

To make Elder Flower Wine.

Take the Flowers of Elde;r, and be careful that you don't let any Stalks in, to every Quart of Flowers put one Gallon of Water, and three Pounds of Loaf Sugar, boil the Water and Sugar a quarter of an Hour^ then pour it on the Flowers, and let it work three Days, then ftrain the Wine through a Hair Sieve, and put it into a Calk," to every ten Gallons of Wine, add one Ounce of Ifmglafs diflblved in Cyder, and fix whole Eggs, clofe. it up, and let it ftand fix Months, and then Bottle it.

To make Balm Wine,

Take nine Gallons of Water to forty Pounds of Sugar, boil them gently for two Hours, fcum it well, then put it into a Tub to cool, then take t^o Pounds and a Half of the Tops of Balm, bruife it, and put it into a Barrel with a little new Y>eaft, and when the Liquor is cold,

pour

¦¦¦¦^

English HOUSE -KEEPER. 307

pour it on the Balm, and ftir it well together, an;d let it ftand twenty-four Hours, and keep ftirring it often, then clofe it up, and let it ftand fix Weeks, then rack it off, and put a Lump of Sugar into every Bottle, cork it well, and it AviU be better the fecond Year than, the fir ft.

N. B Clary Wine is made the fame Way.

To make li^perial Water.

Put two Ounces of Cream of Tartar into a large Jar, with the Juice and Peels of two Le- mons, pour on them feven C^uarts of boiling Water, when it is cold, clear it through a Gawz Sieve, fweeten it to your Tafte, and bottle it. - It will be fit to ufe the next Day.

To cure acid Raifin Wine.

The following Ingredients muft be propor- tioned to th^ Degrees of 'Acidity or Sournefs, if but fmall, yoii muft ufe lefs, if a ftronger acid, a larger Quantity, it muft be proportion- ed to the Quantity of Wine, as welt as the De- grees of Acidity or Sournefs, be fure that the Caflc be near full befpre that you apply the In- gredients, which will have this good EfTcift, the ^cid Part of the Wine will rife to the Top . immediately, and iflue out at the Bung-hole,,   but if the Calk be not full, the Part that ihould fly off will continue in the Caik, and weaken the Body of the Wine, but if your Calk be full, it will be ready tcf have a Body laid on it iiji

Q^q 2, three

3o8 The Experienced

three or four Days Time* - I fliall heric Proper* tion the Ingredients for a Pipe; fuppofing it to be quite acid that is ju ft recoverable: Take two Gallons of Ikimmed Milk, and two Ounces 'of Ifmglafs, boil them a quarter of an Hour, ftrain the Liquor and let it ftand until it is cold, then brccxk it well with your Whifk, add to it four Pounds of Alabafter, and three Pounds of Whit- ing, ftir them well up together, then put in one Ounce of Salt of Tartar, mix by Degrees a little of the Wine with it fo as to diflblve it to a thin Liquor, put thefe in your Caik, and ftir it well with a Paddle^ and it will immediately difcharge the acid Part from it as before-men-^ tioned, when, it has done fomenting, bung it up for three Days, then rack it off, and you will find Part of its Body gone off* by the ftrong Fomentation i to remecly this, you muft lay a frefti Body on in Proportion to the Degree to which it hath been lowered by the above Me^^ thod, always having a fpecial Care not to alter its Flavour, and this muft be done with clari- fied Sugar, for no Fluid will agree with it but what will make it thinner, or confer its own Tafte, therefore the following is the beft Me- thod for performing it: To jay a frefhBodyon Wine, take three Quarters of a Hundred of Brown Sugar, and put it into your Copper, then put in a Gallon of Lime Water to keej) it from burning, ftir it all the while 'till it boils, then mafh three Eggs and Shells altogether, add them to the Sugar, and keep ftimng ic a- bout, and as Scum cm: Filth rifes take it off very f lean, then put it in your Can, and let it ftana

'till

English HOUSE- KEEPER. 309

*till it is cold before you nfe it, then break it with your Whilk by Degrees, with about ten Gal- lons of the Wine, and apply it to the Pipe, work it with the Paddle an Hour, then put a Quart of Stum-forcing to it, which will unite their Bodies, and make it fine and bright.

To make Stum.

Take a five Gallon Caflc that has been well

foaked in Water, fet it to a drain, then take a

Pound of Roll Brimltone and melt it in a Ladle,

put as many Rags to it as will fuck up the

melted Brimftone, burn all thofe Rags in the

Cafk, cover the Bung-hole but let it have a

little, fo that it will keep burning when it is

burned out, put to it three Gallons of the

ftrong^eft Cyder, and one Ounce of common

Allum pounded, mix it with the Cyder in the

Cafk, alid roll it about five or fix Times a Day,

for ten pays, then take out the Bung and hang

the Remainder of the Rags on a Wire in the

Cafk, as near the Cyder as pofIible,and fet them

oii Fire as before, when it is burnt out bung

the Cafk clofe, and roll it well about three or

four Times a Day, for two Days, then let it Hand

fcven or eight Days, and this Liquor will be

fo ftrong as to afFedt your Eyes by looking at

it. When you force a Pipe of Wine take a

Quart of thi$ Liquor, beat half an Ounce of

Ifinglafs, and pull it in fmall Pieces, whifk it

together, and it will diflblvc in four or five

Hours, break the Jelly with your Whifk, add a

pound of Al^bailcr to it and diflblye it in a

little

310 'Th^ Experienced

little'of the Wine, then put it in the Pipe and bung it clofe up, and in a Day's Time, it will be iine and bright.

To refine Male Liquor.

To. cure a Hogfliead of four Ale: Take rwo Ounces of Ifinglafs, diflblve it in two Quarts of new Ale, and fet; it all Night by the Fire, then take two Pounds of coarfe Brown Sugar, and boil it in a Quart of new Wort, a Quarter of an Hour, then put it into a Pail, with two Gallons of new Ale out of the Kear, whiik the above Ingredients very well for an Hour or more 'till it be all of a white Froth, beat very fine one Poland of Plaifter of Paris, and put it into your Cafk, with the Fermentation, and whiik it very well for half an Hour in your Caik with a flfong Hand, until you have brought all the Filth and Sediments from the Bottom of your Cafk, and it will look White; if your Cafk be not full, fill it up with new Ale, and the Fer- mentation will have this good Effedt; the acid Part of the Ale will rile to the Top imme- diately, and ilTue out at the Bung-hole, but if the Calk be not full the Part that fhould fly out, will continue in and weaken the Body of the Ale, be fure you don't fail fiUmg up your Cafk four or five Times a Day, until it has dojie working, and all the Sournefs or white muddy Part is gone, and when it begins to look like new tunned Ale, put in a large Handful of fpcnt Hops, clofe ic up, and let it ftand fix Weeks, if it be not fine, and Cream like bottled Ale, let

it

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 311

it Hand a Month longer, and it will drink brifk

like bottled Ale; this is an* excellent Method,

and I have nfed it to Ale that has been 'both

vrhitc and four, and never found it to fail. If

you have any Malt that you fufpeft is not good^

fave out two Gallons of Wort, arid a few Hours

before you want it, add to it half a Pint of

Barm, and when you have tunned your Drink

into the Barrel, and it hath quite done working,

make the above Fermentation, and when you

have put it in the Barrel, whilk it very well for

half an Hour, and it will fet your Ale on

working a-frelh, and when the two Gallons is

worked white over, keep filling up your Barrel *

with it four or five Times a Day, and let it

work four or five Days, when it has done

working clofe it up; if the Malt has got any

bad Smack or Taftc, or be of a fluid Nature this

will take it off.

To make Sack Mead.

To every Gallon of Water put four Pounds, of Honey, boil it three Quarters of an Hour, and fcum it as before, to each Gallon add half anOunceof Hops,then boil it half an Hour, and let it ftand 'till the next Day, then put it in your Cafk, and to thirteen Gallons of the above Liquor, add a Quart of Brandy or Sack, let it be lightly cfofed 'till the Fermentation is quite done, then make it up veiy clofe; if it be a lirge Caflc let it ftand a Year before you Bpt-* tie it. •

w

¦T^^

31a The Experienced

To make Cowflip Mead.

To fifteen Gallons of Water put thirty Pounds of Honey, boil it 'till one Gallon is wafted, feiim it, then take it oS the Fire, have ready fixteen Lemons cut in Halves, take a Gallon of the Liquor, and pUt it to the Lemons, put the reft of the Liquor into aTub, with fcven Pecks of Cowflips, and let them ftand all Night, then put in the Liquor with the Lemons, and eight Spoonfuls of new Yeaft, - a Handftil of $weet Brier, ftir them all well together, and let it work three or four Pays, .then ftrain it, and put jt in your Cafk, and in fix Months Time you may Bottle it.

> • *



To make Walnut Mead.

To every Gallon of Water put three Pounds and a Half of Honey, boil them together three Quarters of an Hour, to every Gallon of Li- quor, put about two Dozen of Walnut Leaves, pour your Liquor boiling hot upon tliem, let them ftand all Night, then take the Leavfts out and put in a Spoonful of Yeaft, and let it woric two or three Days, then make it up, and let it ftand three Months, then Bottle it. •

To make Ozyat.

Blanch al^oundof Sweet Almonds, and die fame of Bitter, beat them very fine, -with fix Spoonfuls of Orange Flower Water, take three

Ounces

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 313

*

Ounces of the four cold Seeds, if you beat the Almonds, but if you don't beat them, you muft take fix Ounces of the four cold Seeds, then with two Quarts of Spring Water, rub your pounded Seeds aild Almonds fix Times through a Napkin, then add four Pounds of treble refined Sugar, boil it to a thin Syrup, ikim it well, and when it is cold, then Bottle it.

Lemonade for the fame Ufe.

To one Quart of boiled Water, add the Juice of fix Lemons, rub the Hinds of the Lemons w^ith. Loaf Sugar to your own Tafte; when -the Water is near cold, mix the Juice and Sugar with it, then Bottle it for Ufe.

To make a rich Acid for Punch.

Bake Red Currants arid 'ftrain them as you do for Jellies, take a Gallon of the Juice, put to it two Quarts of new Milk, crulh Pearl Goofeberries when full ripe, and drain them through a coarfe Cloth, aad two Quarts of the Juice and three Pounds of double reBned Sugar, three Quarts of Rum and two of Brandy, one Ounce of Ifinglafs diffblved in Part of the Liquor, mix it all up together, and put it in a little Cafk, and let it ftand fix Weeks, and then Bottle it for Ufe. It will keep many Years and fave much Fruit.

R r Tq

314 The Experienced

• * ¦

To make Shrtftj*

Take a Gallon of new MUk, pilt to it nro QJarts of Red Wine, pare fix Lemons and four Seville Oranges very thin, put ia the Rinds, and the Juice of Twelve of each Sort, twoGallons of Rum and one of Brandy, let it ftand twenty- four Hours, add to it two Pounds of double refined Sugar, and fl:ir it wcH together, then put . it in ^ Jug, cover it clofe up and let it itand a Fortnight, then run it through a Jelly Bag, and Bottle it for Ufe.

To make Sherbet,

Take nine Seville Oranges and three Iicmons, grate off the yellow ilinds and put the Rafpings into a Gallon of Water, and three Pounds of double-refined Sugar, and boil it to a Geindy Height, then take it off the Fire, and put in the Juice and Pulp ctf the above, and keep ftiniqg it until it is almoft cold, then put it in a Pot for Ufe,

To Make . RsSph^ry Brandy.

Gather the Rafpberries when the Sun is hot upon them, ana as foon as ever you have got them, to every five Quarts of lljifpberries put one Quart of the belt Brandy, boil a Quart of Water five Minutes with a Pound of douBle- refined Sugar in it, and pour it boiling hot on

the Berries, let them Aand all Night, tnen add

nine

Engush HOUSE-KEEPER. 31J

«

nine Quarts more Brandy, ftir it j^bout very •well, put it in a Stone Bottle, and let it Hand » Month or fix Weeks; when fine Bottle it.

To make black Cherry Brandy.

Take out the Stones of eight Pounds of black Cherries, and put on them a Gallon of the beft terand5r,bruife the Stones in a Mortar, then put. them m your Brandy, covpr them up clofe and let them ftand a Month or fix Weeks, then pour it clear from the Sediments and Bottle it.

To make Orange Brandy.

Parx eiglit Oranges very thin, and Aeepthe Peels in a Quart of Brandy forty-eight Hours in a clofe Pitcher, then take ^hree Pints of Water and three Quarters of a Pound of Loaf Sugar, boil it until it is reduced to half the Quantity, then let it fiand 'till it is cold, then mix it with the Brandy, let it ftand fourteen Days, and then Bottle it,

To make Almond Shrub,

Take three Gallons Rum or Brandy, three .Quarts of Orange Juice, the Peels of three Lemons, three Pounds of Loaf Sugar, then take four Ounces of Bitter Almonds, blanch and beat them fine, mix them in a Pint of Milk, then mh^ them all well together, let it fland an Hour to curdle, run it through a Flannel Bag

R r 2 feveral

31^ The Experienced

feveral Times 'till it is clear, then Bottle it fat Ufe.

To make Currant Shrub.

* • ¦

Pick your Currants clean, from the Stalks when they are full Hpe, and put Twenty-fbur Pounds into a Pitcher, with two Pounds of iingle refined Sugar, clofe the Jug well up, and put it into a Pan of boiling Water 'till they are foft, then ftrain them through a Jelly Bag, and to every Quart of Juice put one Quart of Brandy, a pint of Red Wiae, one Quart of new Milk, a Pound of double refined Sugar, and the Whites of two Eggs w^ beat, mix them all together, and cover them clofe- up two Days, then run it fhrough a Jelly Bag, and Bottle it for Ufe.

To make Walnut Catchup,

Take green' Walnuts before the Shell is formed, and grind them in a Grab Mill, or pound then^ ii> a Marble Mqrtar, fqueeze out the Juice through a coarfe Cloth, put to every Gallon of Juice one Pound of Anchovies, one Pound of Bay Salt, four Ounces of Jamaioi Pepper, two of Long, and two of Black Pep- per, of Mace, Cloves, and Ginger, each one Ounce, and a Stick of Horfe-radifli, boil all together 'till reduced to half the Quantity, nut it in a Por, and when colH Bottle it j it viM pe ready in three Month§,

EngiTish house-keeper. '317

To make Walnut Gatchiip another Way.

Put your Walnuts in Jars, cover thcih with cold ftrong Ale Allegar, tie ' them clofe • for twelve Months, then take the Walnuts out from the Allegar, and put to every Gallon of the Liquor two Heads of Garlick, half a Pound of Anchovies, one Quart of Red Wine,^ or.^ Ounce of Mace, one of Cloves, one of Long, ii^ii^ of Black, and one of Jamaica Pepper, with one of Ginger; boil them all in the Li- quor 'till it is reduced to half the Quantity, the next Day Bottle it for Ufe; it is good in Filh Saute,' or ftewed Beef. In my Opinion it is an excellent Catchup, for the longer it is kept the better it is, I have kept it five Years, and it was much better than when firft made,

\

N. B. You may find how to pickle the Wal- nuts you have taken out, amorigft the other Pickles^

To make Mum Catchup.

To a Quart of old Mum put four Ounces of

Anchovips, of Mace, and Nutmegs flic^d, one

< Ounce, of Cloves, an^ Black Pepper, half an

Ounce^ boil it 'till it is reduced oi)e Third;

when cold Bottle it for Ufe,

r*

3l8 The £XP£II££NGEP

t

TV ifiake^ a Catchup to keepfiv^ T«ars.

Take twp Quarts of the oHeft ftrongBcer you can get, pijt to it one Quart of Red Wine, thfec quarters ctf a Pound of Anchovies^ three Ounces of Shalots peeled^ half an Ounce oi Mace, the fame of Nutmegs, a quarter of an Ounce of Cloves, three large Races of Ginger cut ih SHces, boil all toother over a moderate j^ire, 'till one Thkd is wafted, the next Day bottle it for Ufef it will carry to the £ai^ liidiee^

To make Moihtoom Catchiap.

Take die full grown Flaps of MufhrponiSi txxsSk thetn* with your Hands, throw a Hand- ful of Salt intQ every Peck of Mufhrooms, and let them ftand all Night, then put them into Stew Pans^ and fet theni in a q^ck Oven for twelve Hours, and ilrain them through a Hair Sieve, to every Gallon of Liquor, put of Cloves, Jamaica, Black Pepper, and Ginger one Ounce each, and half a Pound of common Salt, fet t on a ik>w Fire^ and let it boil 'till half the Liquor is wafted away, then put it in a clean Pot, when cold Bottle it for Ufc.

r. * • make MuOiroom Powder.

Take the thickeft large Buttons you can get, peel them, cut oflf the Root-end, but don't wilh them, fpread them feparately on Pewter

Diflies,

English HOtJSE-KEEPER. gtjr

;, *and fet them in a flow Oven to dry, let the -Liqifor dry up into the Muflirooms, it makes the Powder ftronger^ and let them con- tinue in the Oven 'till you find they, will Pow- der^ then heat thetn in a Marble Mortar, and 'fift therrv through a fine Sieve, with a little C!hyan Pepper, and pounded Mace j Bottle tt, and keep it in a dty Clofet.

To make 'Tarragc^ Vinegar.

Take Tarragon juft as it is ^jMag into Bloom, itrip oflF the Leaves, and to every Pound of t.eaves, put a Gallon of ^rong White Wine 'T'inegar in a Stone Jug to foment for a Fort- night, then run it through a Flannel Bag, tcf every four Gallons of Vinegar, put half an Ounce of Ifinglafs diflblved in Gyder, mix it well with the Vinegar, tlien put it into large Bottles, and letitftandoneMon^hto'firje, thqn rack it off, and put it into Pint Bottles for Ufc.

To rf^ake Elder 'Flowet Vinegar.

To every Peck of the .Peeps of Elder Flower, nut tw6 Gallons of ftrong Ale AUcgar, anjl fet 4t in the Sufl in a Stone Jug for a Fortnight, "then filter lit tlyrough a Hann^l B?g, when yoji Bottle it, put it in fmall Bottles, it ieeps^ the Flavour much better than large ones,^ - ^Be care- ful you don't drop any Stalks among the JPe^ps. •It makes a pretty Mixture on a Side Table,

with Tarragon Vinegar, Lemon Pickle, &c.

To

320 The £XP£RI£NG£D

To make Goosberry ViiKpgar.

Take the ripeft Goofberrics you can get, crufh them with your Hands in a Tub, to every Peck of Goosberrjes, put two Gallons of Wa- ter, mix them well together^ and let them work ' ifor three Weeks, fUr them up three or four Times a Day, then ilrain the Liquor through a H iir Sieve, and put to every Gallon a Pound of Brown Sugar, a Pound of Treacle, a Spoon- ful of frelh Barm, and let it work three or four Days in the fame Tub well waflied, tun it inio Iron-hooped Barrels, and let it iiand tvrelvc Months, then draw it into Bottles for 13 fe.- This far exceeds any White Wine Vinegar.

To make Suga,r Vinegar.

Put nine Pounds of Brown Sugar to tverj fix Gallons of Water, boil it for a quarter of an Hour, then put it into a Tub when luke- warm, put to it a Pint of nqw Barm, let it work four or five Days, ftir it up three or four Times a Day, then tun it into a clean Barrel Iron-hooped, and fet it full in the Sun; if you make it in February, it will be fit fcH- Ufe in ^ Auguft; you may ufe It for moll Sorts of Pick- les, except Mulhrooms and Walnuts.

CHAP.

English HOUSE-KEEPER. .321

, CHAP. XVL Obfervations on JPiclding..

PICKLING is a very iifeful Thing in a Family, and is as often ill managed, or at leaft made to pleafe the Eye by pernicious Things, which is the only Thing that ought to "be avoided, for nothing is niore common*
To pickJe Cucumbers .

Take the fmalleft Cucumbers you can get, and as free from Spots as poflible, put them into a ftrong Salt and Water for nine or ten Days, or 'till they are quite Yellow, and ftir

S f them

322 The txPERIENCED

them twice a Day at^ leaft, or they will fcmri over, and grow fof t; when they are thoroughly f Yellow, pour the Water from them, and cover them with Plenty of Vine Leaves, fet your Water over the Fire, when it boils pour it upon them, and fet them on the Hearth to keep warm, when the Water grows cool, make it boiling hot again, and pour it upon them., keep doing fo 'till you fee they are a fine Gf een^ which will be in four or five Titnes, be fure you keep them well covered with Vine Leaves, a Cloth, and Difh over the Top to keep in the Steam, it helps to green them fooner, when they are greened, put them into a Hair Sieve to drain, then make a Pickle for them; to €ver>' two Quarts of White Wine Vinegar, put half an Ounce of Mace, and ten or twelve Cloves, one Ounce of Ginger cut in Slices, the fame of Black Pepper, and a Handful of Salt, boil them all together five Minutes, then pour it hot upon your Pickles, and tie theiii down with a Bladder for Ufe.

N. B. You may pickle them with Ale Alle- gar, or diftilled Vinegar; if you ufe Vinegar, it muft not be boiled; you may add three or four Cloves of Garlick, or Shalots, they are very good for keeping the Pickle from caneing. ' .

To pickle Cucumbers a fecond Way .

Gather your Cucumbers on a dry Day, and put them into a narrow-topped Pitcher,

put-

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 323

put to them a Head of Garlick, a few white muft^d Seeds, and a few Blades qf Mace, Ix^lf an Ounce of Black Pepper, the fame of Long Pepper, and Ginger, and a good Hand- ful of Salt into your Vinegar, pour it upoi^ your Cucumbers boiling hot, fet them by the Fire, 3.nd keep them warm for three Days, and boil your Allegar once every Day, ^ijd keep th^m clofje covered 'till they be a good Green, ajxd then tie them down with a Leather, and )ceep them for Ufe.

To fickle Cucumhers in Slices,

Get your Cucumbers large before the Seeds are ripe, flice them a quarter of an loch thick, then lay them on a Hair Sieve, and betwixt every Lay put a Shalot or two, throw on a litxle Salt, let them ftand four or five Hour? to drain, then put them in a Stone Jar, take as much ftrong Ale Allegar as will cover them, boil it five Minutes, with a Blade or two of Ma^e, a few White Pepper Corns, a little Gin- ger fliced, and fome Horfe-radifh fcraped, then pour it boiling hot upon yoi^r Cucumbers, let them fland 'tUl they are cold, do fo for three Times more; let it go cold betwixt every Time, then tie them down with a Bladder for Ufe.

To pichJe Mangoe.

Take the largeft Cucumbers you can g^t^ before they are too ripe, or Yellow at the Ends, then cut a Piece out of the Side, and take out

S f 2 all

t

324 The Experienced

all the Seeds with an Apple Scraper, or Tea Spoon, and put them into a very ftrong Salt and Water, for eight or nine Days, or 'till they are very Yellow, ftir them very well two or three Times each Day, then put them into a Brafs Pan, v\rith a large Quantity of Vine Leaves both under and over them, beat a little Roach AUum very fine, and put it in the Salt and Water that they came out of, pour it upon your Cucumbers, and fet it upon a very flow Fire, for four or five Hours, 'till they are a pretty Green, then take them out and drain them on a Hair Sieve, when they are cold^ put to them a little Horfe-radifli, then Muftard Seed, two or three Heads of Garlick, a few Pepper Corns, flice a few green Cucumbers in fmall Pieces, then Horfe-radifh, and the fame as before-mentioned, 'till you have filled them, then take the Piece you cut out, and few it on with a large Needle and Thread, and do all the reft the fame Way, have ready your Pickle, to every Gallon of AUegar, put otie Ounce of Mace, the fame of Cloves, two Ounces of Gin- ger iliced, the fame of Long Pepper, Black Pepper, Jamaica Pepper, three Ounces of Muf- tard Seed tied up in a Bag, four Ounces of .Garlick, and a Stick of Horfe-radiih cut in Slices, boil them five Minutes in the AUegar, then pour it upon yoiu* Pickles^ tie them down, ^nd l^eep them for Ufe.

\



English HOUSE -KEEPER. 325

To pickle Codlins.

Get your Codlins when they are the Size of a large French Walnut, put a good deal of Vine Leaves in the Bottom or a Brafs Pan, then put in your Ck)dlins, cover them very well with Vine Leaves, and fet them over a very flow Fire *till you can peel the Skins off, then take them carefully up into a Hair Sieve, and peel them with a Penknife, and put them into the fame Pan again with the Vine Leaves and Wa- ter as before, cover them clofe, and fet them over a flow Fire 'till they are a fine green, then drain them through a Hair Siev?, and when they are cold, put them into diftilled Vinegar, pour a little Meat-Oil on the Top, and tie them down with a Bladder*

To pickle Kjdney Beans.

«

Get your Beans when they are young and

fmall, then put them into a ilrong Salt and

Water for three Days, ftir them up two or three

Times each Day, then put them into a Brafs

Pan, with Vine Leaves ooth imder and over

them, pour on the fame Water as they came

out ofl^ cover them clofe, and fet them over a

very flow Fire 'till they are a fine Green, then

put them into a Hair Sieve to drain, and make

a Pickle for them of White Wine Vinegar, or

fine Ale Allegar, boil it five or fix Minutes,

with a little Mace, Jamaica^ Pepper, Long Pep-

J>ep, and a Race or two of Ginger fliced, then

pour

3a($ The Experienced

j>our it hot upon the Kidney Beans^ and tie them down with a BUdder.

ft

To picile Samphire.

¦

Wash your Samphire very well in four fioall Beer, then put it into a large Brafs Pan, diflblve a little Bay Salt, and twice the Quantity of com^ mon Salt in four Beer, then nil up your Pan with it, cover it clofe, and fet it oyer a flow Fire 'till it is a fine Green, then drain it through a Sieve, and put it into Jars, boil as much Su-;ar Vinegar, or White Wine Vinegar, witli a .ace or two of Ginger, and a tew Pepper Corns, a5 will cover it; then pour it hot upon your Samphire, and tie it well down.

To pickle Walnuts Bhck^

Gather your Walnut* when the Sun is hot upon them, and before the Shell is hard, which you may know by running a Pin injto them, then put them in a ilrong Salt and Water £or nine Days, and ftir them twice a Day, and change the Salt and Water every three Days, then put them into a Hair Sieve, and let thena &and in the Air 'till they turn Black, then put them into firong Stone Jars, and pour boiling; AUegar over tb^m, cover tiiem up, and let them iland 'till tjUey are cdd, then boijL th^ AUegax three Tii»e« more, and let it Hand 'till it i% cold bettwiict ^very I^e; tie them down with Paper and a jBladder over them, and let them ftand two Months, then take them out

of

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 327

of the AUegar, and make a Pickle for them, to every two Quarts of AUegar put half an Ounce of Mace,^e fame of Cloves, one Ounce of Black Pepper, the fame of Jamaica Pepper, Ginger, and Long Pepper, and two Ounces of Comtnon Salt, boil i^ ten Minutes, and pour it hot upon your Walnuts, and tie them down with a Bladder and Paper over iti

AjcQond JVay toptckie Walnuts Blatk.

When you have got your Walnuts as be- fore, put them into cold ftrong AUegar, with a good deal of Salt in it, let them ftand three Months, then pour oflF the Allegar, and boil it with a little more Salt in it, then pour it upon your Walnuts, and let them ftand till they are cold, make it hot again, and pour it upoh your Walnuts, and do fo 'till they are Black, then put them into a Hair Sieve, and make a Pickle for them the fame Way as above^ keep them in ftrong Stone Jars, and they will be fit for Ufe in a Month oi* fix Weeks Time,

To pichJe Walnuts
Gather your Walnuts, and put them in a ftrong Ale Allegar, and tie them down "with a Bladd^, and a Paper over it, to keep out the Air, and let them ftand twelve Months,- then take them out of that* Allegar, a,nd make a Pickle for them of ftrong Allegar, and to every Quart put half an Ount^e erf Jamaica Pepper^ the fame of Long Pepper, a quartet of- aa

• . Ounce

328 The Experienced

»

Ounce of Mace, the fame of Cloves, one Head of Garlick, and a little Salt, boil them all to- gether five or fix Minutes, then pour it upon your Walnuts, when it is cold, neat it again three Times, then tie them down with a Blad- der, and Paper over it j they will keep feveral Years without either turning Ck)lour, or grow- ing foft, if your AUegar be good.

N, B. You may make exceeding good Catchup of the AUegar that comes from your Walnuts, by adding a Pound of Anchovies, one Ounce of Cloves, the fame of Long and Black Pepper, one Head of Garlick, and half a Pound of com- mon Salt to every Gallon of your AUegar, boil it 'till it is half reduced away, and Ikim it very well, then Bottle it for Ufe, and it will keep a long Time.

, To plckk Walnuts White.

Take the largeft French Walnuts, pare them 'till you can fee the White appear, but take great Care you don't cut it too deep, it will make them full of Holes, put them into Sale and Watqr as you pare them, or they will com Black, when you have pared them all, have ready a Sauce Pan well tinned, full of boiling Water with a little Salt, then put in your Wal- nuts, and let them boil five Minutes very quick, then take them out, and fpread them betwixt two clean Cloths, when they are cold, put them into wide mouthed Bottles, and fill them up with diftilled Vinegar, and put a

Blade

English H O US Et- KEEPER. 329

Blade or two of Mace, snd a large Tea Spoon* ful of eating Oil ux every Bottle; the next Day Cork, them well, and keep them in a dry Place*

To piikle Wilniits Green.

• Tf'AKE tlie large double, or French Walnuts, before the Shells are hard, wrap them fingly in Vine Leaves, put a few Vine Leave9 in the Bottom of your Jar, fill it near full with your Walnuts, take Care that they don't touch one another, put a good many Leaves over them, then fill your Jar with good Alegar, cover them clofe that the Air cannot get in, let them ftand for three Weeks, then pour the Alegar from them, put f refh Leaves m the Bottom 6f ano- ther Jar, take out your Walnuts, and wrap them feparately in frefh Leaves as quick as pol- fibly you can, put them into yoiu: Tar y^ith a good many Leaves over'them, then nil it with White Wine Vinegar, let them fiand three Weeks, pour off your Vinegar, and wrap them as before with frefli Leaves at the Bottom and Top of your Jar, take frefli White Wine Vine- gar, put Salt in it 'till it will bear an Ege, add to it Mace, Cloves, Nutmeg, and Gartlck if you chufe it, boil it about eight Minutes, then pour it on your Walnuts, tie them clofe with Paper and a gladder, and fet them by for Ufe,- ^ Be fure to keep them always covered, when you take any out for Ufe, what is left muft not be put in again, but have ready a iPrefli

T t Jar

^ •

330. The EXPRRIENCED

Jax with boikd Vinegar and Salt to put them in.

To pickle Barberries*

Get your Batbetries before they are too ripe, pick out the Leaves, and dead Stalks, then put them into Jars, with a large Quantity of ftrong^ Salt and Water, and tie them down wit^ % Bladder*

N. B. When you fee your Barberries to ftum over, put them into frefli Salt and Water, they" need no Vinegar, their own fharpnefs is fuffi- cient enough to keep them.

7o p'tQkle Parfley Green.

Take a large Quantity of cutled Parfley, make a ftrong Salt knd Water to bear an Egg, put in your Parfley, let* it ftand a Week, then take, it out to drain, make a frefli Salt and Water as before, let it ftand another Week, then drain it very well, put it in Spring Water, and change it evefy Day for three Days, then fcald it in hard Water *till it becomes Green, take it out and drain it quite dry, boil a Quart of diftilkd Vinegar a few Minutes, witH two or three Blades of Mace, a Nutmeg fliced, and a Shalot or two; when it is quite irold, pour it on your Pariley, with two or three Slices of Horfe-radifli, and keep it for Ufe.

To

English. HOUSE-KEEPER. 331

To piM Nafturtians.

* OaThbr the Nailurtiail Berries foon afterthe 3lc>f!bms are goife off, put them in cold Salt and "WafttfT, change thef Water once a Day for three -Days, make your Pickle of White -Wine Vine- gdr^ Mace, Nutioaeg fliced, Pepper Corns, Salt, iShalots, and Horfe-radUh; it requires to be made pretty iixong, as your Pickle is hbt to be boiled; wnen you have drained them, put thexQ into a Jar, and pour the Pickle over theni;

To pickle Radifh Pods.

Gather youf Radifh Pods when they are quite toxmg^ and put them in Salt and Water all Night, then boil the Sah and Water they were laid in^ and pour it upon yoiur Pdds, and cover your Jars clofe to keep in the Steam,^ when it grows cold, make it boiling hot, and pour, it on again, keep doing fo 'till your Pods are quite Green, then put them on a Sieve to drain, and make a Pickk for them of White Wine Vinegar, ^ith a little Mace, Ginger, ^ong Peppeivand Horfe-radifli, pour it boil- ing hot upcwlyour Pods, when it is almoft cold, make your Vine^r twice hot as before, and pour it upon 'them, and tie them down with a Bladder,

T t 2 To

332 The Exi^ERiENCBft

To pickle Elder Shoots.

Gather your Elder Shoots when they are the thicknefs of a Pipe-fhank, pat thenr into Salt and Water all Nighty then put them into Stone Jars in Layers, and hetwixt every Layer ftrew a little Mnftard Seed/ and fcraped Horfe?- Radifh, a few Shalots, a little White Beet Root, and CSoUy-Flower pulled in fmall Pieces, chea

¥3ur boiling Alegar upon it, and fcald it three imes, and it will be like Piccalillo, or Indian Pickle; tie a Leather over it, and keep it in a dry Place.

To ptckh Elder Buds.

Get you Elder Buds when they aie the Size of Hope Buds, and put them into a ibong Salt and Water for nine Days, and ftir them two €x three Times a Day, then put them into a Brafs Pan, cover them with Vine Leaves, and pour the Water on them that they came out of, and fet them over a .flow Fire 'till they are quite Green, then make ^ Pickle for them of Ale-? ^ar, a little Mace, a few Shalots; and fome dinger fliced, boil them two or three Minutes, and pour it upon your Buds; tie them down, and keep them in a dry Place for Ufe*

To pickle Beet Roots.

Take Red Beet Roots an4 boil them 'till they are fender, fhen tal^e the Skins off, and cut

them

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 333

ti^bem in Slices, and gimp them in the Shape of Wheels, Flowers, or what Form you pleale, stnd put them into a Jar, then take as much Vinegar* as you think will cover them, and l>oil it with a little Mace, z Race of Ginger iliced, and a few Slices of Hore-radifh, pour it hot upon your Roots, and tie them down.- They are a very pretty G^rnilh for made Diihes.

! •

To pickJe Colly-Flowers.

Take the clofe& and w;hiteft Ctolly-Flowers you can gt% and pull them in Bunches, and ipread them on an Earthen Difli, and lay Salt all over them, let them ftand for three Days to bring out all the Water, then put them in Earthen Jars, and pour boiling Salt and Water upon them, and let them ftand all Night, then drain them on a Hair Sieve, and put mem into Qlafs Jajrs, and fill up your Jars with diftille4 Vinegar, and tie them clofe down with Leather.

^ fscond fFefy to pickle Colly-Flowers*



Pull your CoUyf^Flowers in Bunches as be- fore, and give them juft a fcajd in Salt and Water, fpread them on a Cloth and fprinkle a iitde Salt over them^ and throw another Cloth upon them 'till they are drained, then lay them on Sieves, and dry them in the Sun 'till they are quite dry like Scraps of Leather, put them into Jars about half full, and pour hot Vinegar (with Spice boiled in it to your Tafte) upon

them 9

theni; tie th^m down with a Bladder, and a Leather quite dofe.

N. ^ White Cabbage is done the fame VTay.

To pickle Red Cabbage.

G^T the fineft and clofeft Red Cabbage yao can, and cut it as thin as poffible, then lake fome cold Ale Alegar, and put to it two or three Blades of Mace, a few VThite Pepper Corns, and make it pretty- ibopg with Salt, put your Cabbage into the Alegar as you cut It; tie it clofe down with a Bladder, and a Paper over in, and it will b
70 pUkU Hed Cabbage a foconi W§y,

Cut the C^tbbage as before, and throw fome Sale upon it, and let it lie two or three Day* 'till it grows a fine Purple, then drain it from the Salt, and put it into a Pan with Beer Alegar, and Spice to your liking, and give it a fcald; when it is cold, put it into your Jar s, and tie it clofe up,.

T» pM Giapea*

*

Get your Grapes when they are pretty large^ but not too ripe, then put a Layer iilto a Stone Jar, then a Layer of Vine Leaves, then Grapes and Vine Leaves as before, 'till your Tar is full; then take two Quarts of Water, half a Pound

of

¦Ml

English HOUSE-TCEEPER^ 33^

Dff Bay Sakj^ the feiEe of common Salt, boil it

hialf an Hour,- ikiiti it well, and take it off to

fettle, when it ii Milk-tearm, pour the deir

Liquor upon the Grapes ap4 1^7 ^ good deal

of Vine Leaves upoftthe Top, and cover it clofe

up with a Cloth, and fet it upon the Hearth

ft>r two Days, then take your Grape§ out of

your Jar, and lay them upott A Cloth to drain,^

and clover them With a Flannel 'till they are

q[Tiite dry; then lay them in fiat-bottomed*

Seone- Jdrs in Lay eta, and put frelh Vine Leives

betwixt every Layer, and a lai^ge Handful
the TpJ> of the Grapes, then fel a Quart of

hard Water,, and one Pound of LOaf Sugar, a

Quarter of an Houf, .ik>m it well, qihd! put to k'

three Bkdes of Mace, a large Nutmeg fliced,

aiid two Quarts of White Wine Vinegar, give

them ail^a boil together, then take it oif and-

wf^enft is quite rold^ pour it Upon your Grapes,

ai^ cover them very well with it; put a Bladder

upon the Top, and tie a Leather over it, and

keep them in a dry Place for Ufe;

Nl B.' You may ^pickle thena m cold diftilled

Vinegar. .

To jfickJe young Artichgkes.

Gfif your Ardchokes as fbon as they are ^ formed, and boil them in a ftrdng Salt and Water for two or ttiree Minutes^ then lay them' upon a Hair Sieve to drain, when they are cold, put them into narrow-topped Jars, then take as mtich White Wine Vinegar as will cover your

Artichokes,

3j3<5 The Exp-eriemced



Artichokes, boil it with a Blade or two dE Mace, a few Slices of Ginger, and a Nutiaeg cut thio, poi;ir it oa hot, ai^d tie them dowzL

Tq pickle MoiObrooms* -

Gather the fmalleft-Mufhrooms you can get, and put them into Spring Water, then rub them witn a Piece of new Flannel, dipped inSalti and throw them into cold Spring Water as you do theni to keep their Colour^ then put them into a well tinned Sauce Pan, and throw a Handful of Salt over them, cover them clck and fet them over the Fire four or £ve Minutes^ or *till you fee they are thoroughly hot, and the Liquor is drawn out of them, then lay them between two clean' Cloths 'till they are cold, then put them into Glafs Bottles, and fill them up with dillilled Vinegar, and put a Blade or two of Mace, a Tea Spoonful of eating Oil m every Bottle, Cork them clofe up, and fet them in a cool Plate.

• N. B. If you have not any diftilled^ Vinegar, you may ufe White Wine Vinegar, or Ale Alegar will do, but it mull be boiled with a little Mace, Salt, and a few Slices of Ginger, it muft go cold before you pour it on your Mum- roomiS; if your Vinegar or Alegar be too Iharp, it will fpften your Muflirooms, neither w21 they keep fo long, nor be io White.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 337

To pickJe Onions.

Peel, the fmalleft Onions you can get, and put them into Salt and Water for nine Days, and. change the Water every Day, then put them into Jars, and pour frefli boiling Salt and Water over them, let them Hand clofe covered until they are cold; then make fome more Salt and Water, and pour it boiling hot upon them, and when it is cold, put your Onions into a Hair-Sieve to drain; then put them into wide .mouthed Bottles, and fill them up with diftilled Vinegar, and put into every Bottle a Slice or two of Gin ;er, one Blade of Mace, and a large Tea-Spoontul of Eating Oil. - It will keep the Onions white, then cork them weH up.

N. B. If you like the Tafte of a Bay L^af, put one or two into 6very Bottle, and as much Bay Salt as will lie on a Six-pence.

To make Indian Pickle, or Piccalillo.

Get a White, Cabbage, one GoUy-Flower, a few fmall Cucumbers, Radifli Pods, Kidney Beans, and a little . Beet Root, or any other Thing you commonly pickle j then put them on a Hair SJieve, and throw a large Handful of Salt over them, and fet them in the Sun- .iObine, or before the Fire for three Days to dry, when all the Water is inin out of tqem, put them into a large Earthen Pot in Layers, and betwixt every Layer, put a Handful of brown

U u ' Muftard

'n .

338 T^ie Experienced

Muftard Seed, then take as much Ale Alegar as you think will cover it, and to every four Quarts of Alegar, put an Ounce of Tunncricfc, boil them together, and pour it hot upon your Pickle, and let it ftand twelve Days upon the Hearth, or 'till the Pickles are all of a brrgiir yellow Ctolour, and moft 0/ the Alegar fucked up; then take two Quarts of ftrong Ale Alegar, one Ounce of Mace, the fame olF White Pepper, a Quarter of an Ounce of Cloves, the fame of Long Pepper and Nutmeg; heat theui all together, and boil them ten Minutes in ^our Alegar, and poiu- it hot upon your Pickle, with ^our Oimces of Garlick peeled j tie it clofc down, and keep it for Ufe.

r

N. B. You may put in frefti Pickles, as the. Thing comes in Seafon,and keep them covered with Vinegar, &c,

A Tickle in Imitation of Indian Bamboe«

Take the young Shoots of Elder, about the Beginning or Middle of May; take the Middle of the Stalk, the Top is not worth doing, peel off the out Kind, and lay them in a ftrong Brine of Salt and Beer, one Night, dry them in a Cloth fingle, in the mean Time, make a Pickle of half .G6ofberry Vinegar, and half Ale Alegar, to every Quart of Pickle put one Ounce of Long Pepper, one Ounce of fliced Ginger, a few Corns of Jamaica Pepper, a litdc Mace, boil it, and pour it hot upon the Shoots, and ftop the Jar clofe, and fet it clofe bv the Fire Twenty-four Hours, ftirring it very often.

CHAP.

I

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 339

m

CHAP. XVII.

Ohfirvations on beeping Garden -Stuff, and

. Fruit.

THE Art of keeping Garden-SniflF, is to keep it in dry Pkces, for damp will not only make them mould, and give again, but take oflF the Flavour, fo it will likewife fpoil any Kind of bottled Fruit, and fet them on ivorking; the beft Caution I can give, is to keep them as dry as poflible, but not warm, and when you boil any dried Stuflf, have Plenty of Water, and follow ftriftly the Direftions of your Receipts.

To keep Green Peas.

Shell any Quantity of Green Peas, and juft give them a boU in as much Spring Water as will cover them, then put them ia a Sieve to drain, pound the Pods with a little of the Water that the Peas were boiled in, and ftrain what Juice you can from them, and boil it a quarter of an Hour, with a little Salt, and as much of the Water as you think will cover the Peas in the Bottles, fill your Bottles with Peas, and pour in your Water, when cold put rendered Suet over, and tie them down clofe with a Bladder, and a Leather over it, and keep your Bottles in a dry Place.

U u 2 To

340 The Experienced-^

To keep Green Peas another l^ay^

Gather your Peas in the Afternoon on i dry Day, fhell them, and put them into dry clean Bottles, Cork them clofe, and tie them over with a Bladder; keep them in a cool dry Place as before.

To keep French Beans.

Let your Beans be gathered ^uite dry, and not too old, lay a Layer of Salt m the Bottom of an Earthen Jar, then a Layer of Beans, then Salt, then Beans, 'till you have filled your Jar; let the Salt be at the Top, tie a Piece of Leather over thera^ and lay a Flag on the Top, and fet them in a dry Cellar for Ufe.

To keep French Beans dfecond Way,

1

Make a ftrong Salt and Water that will bear an Egg, and when it boils put in your French Beans for five or fix Minuets, then lay them on a Sieve, and put to your Salt and Water a little Bay Salt, and boil it ten Minutes, fkim \t well, and pour it into an Earthen Jar to cool and fettle, put your French Beans into narrow- topped Jars, and pour your clear Liquor over them; tie them clofe down that no Air can get in, and keep theni in a dry Place.

N. B. Steep them in Plenty of Spring Water the Night before you^ ufe them, and boil them iji hard Water.

English HOUSE-KEEt»ER. 341:

To keep Muilirooms to eat likefrejh ones.

Wash large Buttons as you would for ftew- ing, Jay them on Sieves, with the Stalk up- iw^ards, throw over them fome Salt to fetch out the Water, when they are drained, put them in a Pot, and fet them in a cool Oven for an Hour, then take them carefully out, and lay them to cool and drain, boil the Liquor that comes out of them with a Blade or two of Mace, and boil it half away, put your Muflirooms into a clean Jar well dried, and ^when the Liquor is cold, cover your Mulh- rooms in the Jar with it^ and pour over it ren- dered Suet, tie a Bladder over it, fet them in a dry Clofet, and they will keep very well moft of the Winter, - When you ufe them, take them out of the Liquor, pour over them boil*- ing Milk, and let them ftand an Hour, then ftew them in the Milk a quarter of an Hour, thicken them with Flour, ajid a large Quantity of Butter, and be careful you don't Oil it, then beat the if oiks of two Eggs with a little Cream, and put it in, but don't let it boil after the Eggs are in J lay untoafted Sippets round the Inude of the Dim, and ferve them up; they will eat near as good as fteih gathered Muihrooms, l€ they don't tafte ftrong enough, put in a little of the Liquor: This is a valuable Liquor, and it will give all made Diflies a Flavour like frelh Mufhrooms,

To

34* ' . The Experienced

To keep Muftirooms another Way,

Scrape large Flaps, peel them, take out Ac Infide, and boil them in their own Liquor and a little Salt, then lay them on Tins, and fct them in a cool Oven, and repeat it 'till they are dry; put them in clean Jars, tie them. cloie down, and they will eat very good.

To dry Artichoke Bottoms.

Plukik the Artichokes from the Stalks, (juft before they conje to their full Growth) it will draw out all the Strings from the Bottoms, and boil them fo that you can juft pull off the Leaves, lay them on Tins, and fet them in a cool Oven, and repeat it 'till they are dry, which you may know by holding them vl^ againft the Light, and if you can fee througn them, they are dry enough; put them in Paper Bags, and hang them in a dry Place.

To Bottle Damfons to tat as good as frejh ones.

Get your Damfons carefully when they are juft turned Colour, and put them into wide-* mouthed Bottles, Cork them up loofely, and let them ftand a Fortnight, then look them over, and if you fee any of them mould or fpot, take them out and Cork the beft clofe down; fet the Bottles in Sand, and they will keep *till Spring, and be as ^ood as frefli ones.

To

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 343

^^^^^ •

To Bottle Goosbcrries.

Pi GK Green Walnut Goofberries, bottle th^m, knd fill the Bottles with Spring Water up to the Neck, cork them loofely, and fet them in a Copper of hot Water, 'till they are hot quite through, then take them out, and when they are cold, Gork them clofe and tie a Bladder over, and fet them in a dry cool Place*

To Bottle • Goosbcrries a ficond ffuy^

Put one Ounce of Koach Allum^ beat fine,

into a large Pan of boiling hard Water, pick

your GoolDerries, and put a few in the Bottom

of. a Hair Sieve, and hold them in the boiling

Water, 'till they turn white; then take out the

Sieve, and fpread the Goofberries betwixt tw©

clean Cloths, put more Goofberries in your

Sieve, and repeat it 'till you have done all your

Berries, put the Water into a glazed Pot 'till

next Day, then pirt your Gooiberries into wide

mouthed Bottles, and pick out all the cracked

and broken ones, pour your Water clear out of

the Pot, and fill up yoiu: Bottles with it j then

put in the Corks loofely, and let them Hand for

a Fortnight, and if they rife to the Corks, draw

them out, and. let them ftand for two or three

Days uncbrked-, then cork them clpft, and they

will keep two Years.

** • • ! r

To

344 The Experienced »

To Bottk Cranberries.

I

. Get your Cranberries when they are qmte dry, put them into dry clear Bottles, Cork them up Ciofey and fet them in a dry cool Place.

To Dottle Green Curraacs.

«

Gather your Currants when the Sun is hot upon them, ftrip them from the Stalks, and put them into Glafs Bottles, and Cork them clofe^ fet them over Head in dry Sand, and they will keep 'till Spring.



To keep Grapes.

Cut your Bunches of Grapes, with a Joint of the Vine to them, hang them up in a dry Bxx>m, that the Bunches do not touch one another, and the Air pafs freely betwixt them, or they will grow mouldy, and rot j they will keep 'till the latter End of January, or longer.

N. B. The Frontiniac Grape is the bell.

CHAP. xvra.

Obfervations on Diftilling.

IF your Still be a Limbeck, when you fet it on fill the Top with cold Water, and make a jyittle Pafte of Flour and Water, and clofe the

bottom

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 345

Bottom of your Still well with it, and take ^reat Care that your Fire is not too hot to make It boil over, for that will weaken the Strength
To diftill Caudle Water.

Take Wormwood, Hore-Hound, Feather- few, and Lavender- Cotton, of each three Handfuls, Rue, Pepper-Mint, and Seville O- range Peel, of each a Handful, fteep them in , Rcd Wine, or the Bottoms of llrong Beer all Night, then diftill them in a hot Still pretty quick, and. it will be a fi^e Caudle to take as Bittew..


^^6 The Experienced

To diftiU Mlk Water:

Take two Handfuls of Spear or Pepper- Mint, the fame of Balm, one Handful of Card\is> the fame of Worpiwood and one erf Angelico, cut them into Lengths a Quaiter long, and ileep them in: three Quarts of ikimmed Milk twelve Hours, then duUU it in a cold Still, \yith a flow JFire under it, keep a Cloth always, wet oyer the Top of your Still, to keep the Liquor from boiling over, the next Day bottle ic, cork it. well, and keep it for \J£c

To make Hcphoatick Water ^or the Gravels

Gather your Thorn Flowers in May, when they are in full Bloom, and pick them from the Stems and Leaves, and to every half Peck of Flowers, take three Quarts of Lifbon Wine, and put into it a Quarter of a Pound of Nut- megs fliced, and let them fteep in it all Night, then put it into your Still with the Peeps, and keep a moderate even Fire under it, for if you let it boil over, it will lofe its Strength*

To difiill Pepper-Mint Water.

Get your Pepper-Mint when it is full grown, and berore it Seed«, cut it in Ihort Lengths, fill your Still with it, and put it half fuU of Water, then make a good Fire under ii^ and when it is nigh boUing, and the Still begins to drop, if your Fire be too hot, draw

English HOUSE-KEEPER. 347

a little out from under it, as you fee it requires, to keep it from boiling over, or your Water •will be muddy, the flower your Still drops, the Water will be clearer and ftronger, but don't fpend it too far, the next Day bottle it, and let itftand three or four Days, to take the Bire off the Still, then cork it well, and ii will keep a long Time.

To diftitt Elder-Flower Water.

Get your Elder-Flowers, when they are in fall Bloom, fhake the Bloifoms off, and to every Peck of Flowers, put one Quart of Water, and let them fteep in it all Night; then put them in a cold Still, and take Care that your Water comes cold off the Still, and it will be very clear, and draw it no longer than your Liquor is good, then put it into Bottles, and Cork it in two or three Days, and it will keep a Year.


To difliU Rofc Water.

Gather your Red Rofes when they are dry and full blown, pick off the Leaves, and to every Peck put^one Quart of Water, then put them into a cold StilT, and make a flow Fire under it, the flower you diftill it the better it is, then Bottle it, and Cork it in two or three Days Time, and keep it for Ufe,

N. B. ^ You may dillill Bean-Flowers ^he fame

348 The Experienced

To diftill Penay-Royal Water.

Get your Penny -?Royal when it is fiill grown, and before it is in Bloflbm, then fill your cold Still with it> and J[)Ut it half full of Water, make a moderate Fire under it, and diftill it otf cold, then put it into Bottles, and Cork it in two or three Days Time, and keep it for Ufe.

To dijlill Lavender Water.

To every twelve Pounds of Lavender^Neps, pyx one Qijart of Water, put them into a cold Still, and make a ilow Fire under it, and didill it off very flow, and put it into a Pot 'till you have diftilled all yovjr Water, then clean your Still well out, and put your Lavender Water into it, and diftill it off as flow as before, then put it into Bottles, and Ck>rk it welL

To difiill Spirits of Wine.

Take the Bottoms of ftrong Beer, and any Kind of Wines, put then) into a hot Still about three Parts full, then make a very flow Fire tinder it, and if you don't take great Care to k<*ep it moderate, it will boil over, for the Body is fo ftrong, that it will rife to the Top of the Still; the flower you diftill it the ftroriger your Spirit will be, put it into an Earthen Pot 'till you have done diftilling, then clean your Still well out, and put the Spirit into it, and diftill it flow as before, and make it as ftrong ^s to burn in your Lamp, then Bottle it, and

Cork it well, and keep it for Ufe,

INDEX and SEASONAL LIST Omitted





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